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Dr. Saba Banu

BDS

Dentist, Bangalore

9 Years Experience  ·  150 at clinic
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Dr. Saba Banu BDS Dentist, Bangalore
9 Years Experience  ·  150 at clinic
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Personal Statement

Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
More about Dr. Saba Banu
Dr. Saba Banu is an experienced Dentist in RT Nagar, Bangalore. She has been a practicing Dentist for 9 years. She studied and completed BDS . She is currently practising at Smilez Dental Care in RT Nagar, Bangalore. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Saba Banu on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Dentists in India. You will find Dentists with more than 31 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Dentists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
BDS - - 2009
Languages spoken
English
Professional Memberships
Indian Dental Association
Karnataka State Dental Council

Location

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Smilez Dental Care

#3, Ground Floor, Shampura 1st Main Road, Appajappa Layout, R.T.Nagar PostBangalore Get Directions
150 at clinic
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Smoking and Tooth Decay

BDS, Certificate course in Oral Implantology
Dentist, Aligarh
Smoking and Tooth Decay
Smoking or consuming smokeless tobacco is very harmful for your teeth. It can lead to various oral diseases like oral cancer, gingivitis, periodontitis and tooth decay. 
1 person found this helpful

At what age tonsillectomy is required and what are the precautions to be taken after it?

MDS - Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
Dentist, Chennai
At what age tonsillectomy is required and what are the precautions to be taken after it?
A tonsillectomy is a surgical procedure to remove the tonsils. Tonsils are two small glands located in the back of your throat. Tonsils house white blood cells to help you fight infection, but sometimes the tonsils themselves become infected. Precautions: don't take aspirin or other medications containing aspirin for at least two weeks prior to surgery. Don't eat anything after midnight before the scheduled surgery. Your surgeon should provide you with instructions about eating food and drinking liquids prior to reporting to the hospital. Make arrangements for a ride home. Plan for 10 days to two weeks or more of recovery time. Adults may need more time than children do.
1 person found this helpful
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Hello, I have Pain near RCT- tooth since 5 pm today. I had never any sensation in this tooth after the RCT (3 years ago. I had not got crown implanted on it. Kindly, advise me asap.

MDS - Periodontics
Dentist, Surat
Hello,
I have Pain near RCT- tooth since 5 pm today. I had never any sensation in this tooth after the RCT (3 years a...
Crowns are always required after rct because it gets weaker. Forces while eating can do fracture of rct treated tooth. That's why dentist suggest a cap but patients don't get it done. Consult your dentist.
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I have dental problem when I eat something it striking in teeth and sometimes when I take cool water getting heavy pain please advice.

BDS
Dentist, Raipur
I have dental problem when I eat something it striking in teeth and sometimes when I take cool water getting heavy pa...
Kindly get scaling done and brush your teeth twice daily using senquel f toothpaste and senquel ad mouthwash twice daily for 15 days.
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Gud morning sir, I'm facing a problem i. E. Bad smell come from mouth, I don't know why it happens but I tried many tooth pastes n in a day 2 times etc but there is no charge and my teeth looking good n white.

MDS - Periodontics, BDS
Dentist, Ranchi
Gud morning sir,
I'm facing a problem i. E. Bad smell come from mouth, I don't know why it happens but I tried many t...
Many times white teeth have hidden gum infections or carious teeth. Get your thorough oral check up done. Meanwhile: maintain good oral hygiene. Beside routine brushing do water rinsing after every snacks or meal avoid such food causing mal odor like onion, garlic, etc get scaling done 6 monthly can use mouthwash.
3 people found this helpful
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Hi I am suffering from teeth problem day by day its getting shorter He can I get over?

BDS
Dentist, Bangalore
Hi I am suffering from teeth problem day by day its getting shorter He can I get over?
Dental attrition is a type of tooth wear caused by tooth-to-tooth contact,[1] resulting in loss of tooth tissue, usually starting at the incisal or occlusal surfaces. Tooth wear is a physiological process and is commonly seen as a normal part of aging. Advanced and excessive wear and tooth surface loss can be defined as pathological in nature, requiring intervention by a dental practitioner. The pathological wear of the tooth surface can be caused by bruxism, which is clenching and grinding of the teeth. If the attrition is severe, the enamel can be completely worn away leaving underlying dentin exposed, resulting in an increased risk of dental caries and dentin hypersensitivity. It is best to identify pathological attrition at an early stage to prevent unnecessary loss of tooth structure as enamel does not regenerate Prevention[edit] Patient Wearing Occlusal Splint When a diagnosis of bruxism has been confirmed, it is recommended that the patient buy a full-coverage acrylic occlusal splint, such as a Michigan Splint or Tanner appliance, to prevent further bruxism. Patients must be monitored closely, with clinical photographs 6–12 monthly to evaluate if the tooth surface loss is being prevented. Treatment[edit] Cosmetic or functional intervention may be required if tooth surface loss is pathological or if there has been advanced loss of tooth structure.[18] The first stage of treatment involves managing any associated conditions, such as fractured teeth or sharp cusps or incisal edges. These can be resolved by restoring and polishing sharp cusps. Then, desensitizing agents such as topical fluoride varnishes can be applied, and at home desensitising toothpastes recommended. Many restorative options have been proposed, such as direct composite restorations, bonded cast metal restorations, removable partial dentures, orthodontic treatment, crown lengthening procedures and protective splints.[18] The decision to restore the dentition depends on the wants and needs of the patient, the severity of tooth surface loss and whether tooth surface loss is active.[16] The use of adhesive materials to replace lost tooth structure can be performed as a conservative and cost-effective approach before a more permanent solution of crowns or veneers is considered.
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I have bad breath since couple of weeks my mouth becomes dry. Especially when I wake up it stinks. First I thought its because I am not drinking enough water but thats not the problem. I brush my teeth two times a day. Not on any other prescription. Please help. Thanks.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
I have bad breath since couple of weeks my mouth becomes dry. Especially when I wake up it stinks. First I thought it...
Dear user. The most common cause of bad breath is poor oral hygiene. Bacteria that build up on your teeth – particularly between them – as well as your tongue and gums, can produce unpleasant-smelling gases. These bacteria are also responsible for gum disease and tooth decay. If you are sure about your mouth and teeth, do consult a doctor for acidity and indigestion treatment. Take care.
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BDS, PGDFO
Dentist, Gadchiroli
If you are constantly engaged in sports related activities, always wear a mouthguard to protect your mouth and orthodontic appliances while the treatment is going on.

Post graduate certificate course of implantogy, BDS
Dentist,
Diabetes and Oral Health

During the past 10 years, much research has been undertaken on the link between diabetes and periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is the sixth leading complication of diabetes. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease, with a higher rate of more severe levels of bone loss and gum infection.1

What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a serious disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches, and other foods into energy. Normally, insulin helps get sugar from the blood to the body's cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, your body has trouble making and/or using insulin, so your body does not get the fuel it needs and your blood sugar stays too high. High blood sugar sets off processes that can lead to complications, such as heart, kidney, and eye disease, or other serious problems.2,3

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you are 3 to 4 times more likely to develop periodontal disease.

Are There Different Types of Diabetes? It is estimated that more than 20 million adults and children in the United States have some form of diabetes?14 million having been diagnosed with the disease and 6 million being unaware they have it. There are different types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Most Americans (around 90%) who are diagnosed with diabetes have type 2 diabetes.2,3

What Is Periodontal Disease? Periodontal disease, or gum disease, is a bacterial infection of the gums, ligaments, and bone that support your teeth and hold them in the jaw. If left untreated, you may experience tooth loss. The main cause of periodontal disease is bacterial plaque, a sticky, colorless microbial film that constantly forms on your teeth. Toxins (or poisons) produced by the bacteria in plaque irritate the gums, causing infection.4

Diabetes Control and Periodontal Treatment

Periodontal disease may make it more difficult for you to control your blood sugar. Your body's reaction to periodontal disease can increase your blood sugar level. Consequently, it is important for patients with diabetes to treat and eliminate periodontal infection for optimal diabetes control. Periodontal treatment combined with antibiotics has been shown to improve blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes, suggesting that treating periodontal disease could decrease insulin requirements.1

What Are the Warning Signs?

DIABETES

Constant hunger or thirstFrequent urinationBlurred visionConstant fatigueWeight loss without tryingPoor wound healing (cuts or bruises that are slow to heal)Dry mouthItchy, dry skinTingling or numbness in the hands or feetMost people with diabetes do not notice any warning signs
PERIODONTAL DISEASE 
Red and swollen gums that bleed often during brushing or flossing and are tender to the touchGums that have pulled away from the teeth, exposing the rootsMilky white or yellowish plaque deposits, which are usually heaviest between the teethPus between the teeth and gums accompanied by tenderness or swelling in the gum areaA consistent foul, offensive odor from the mouth

IMPORTANT: Physicians and Dentists Need to Work Together

It is important that your dentist be kept up-to-date on your diabetic condition and treatment and that your physician be kept up-to-date on your oral condition and treatment, so that they can work together to help you control your diabetes and prevent or control periodontal disease.1

Keep your dentist up-to-date on your diabetic condition and your physician up-to-date on your oral condition.

If your diabetic condition is well controlled, periodontal treatment would be the same for you as for a patient without diabetes. In early stages, treatment usually involves removing the plaque and calculus from the pockets around your teeth. If the periodontal disease is more severe or if your diabetes is not well controlled, treatment will be more specialized and tailored toward your specific condition. Your dentist may recommend more frequent oral prophylaxes (dental cleanings) involving scaling and root planing or may recommend periodontal surgery.1

Diabetes and Your Mouth

Periodontal disease is not the only problem that can occur if you have diabetes. Although you might not be able to prevent these problems, you can minimize the trouble they cause you5:

Dry mouth: Xerostomia occurs when your salivary glands don't produce sufficient saliva to keep your mouth moist, causing tissues in your mouth to become inflamed and sore. It can make chewing, tasting, and swallowing more difficult, as well as cause difficulty in eating, making it more difficult to control blood sugar.Fungal infection: Candida albicans is a fungus that normally lives inside the mouth without causing any problems. But when you have diabetes, deficient saliva in your mouth and extra sugar in your saliva allow the fungus to cause an infection called candidiasis (thrush), which appears as sore white or red areas in your mouth.Burning mouth syndrome: If you feel severe burning and pain in your mouth even though you don't see any problems causing it, you may have this syndrome.Oral surgery complications:If you need oral surgery, diabetes? particularly if poorly controlled?can complicate oral surgery. Diabetes retards healing and increases risk of infection. Your blood sugar levels also may be harder to control after oral surgery. Your dentist should work closely with your physician to minimize possible complications. If you need oral surgery, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you: 
Remind your dentist that you have diabetes and discuss any specific diabetes-related issues.Eat before your dental visit so your blood sugar is within normal range.Take your usual medications. Your dentist should consult with your physician about whether you can adjust your diabetes medications or take an antibiotic to prevent infection before surgery.Plan for your eating needs after surgery. If you're having dental work that may leave your mouth sore, plan to eat soft or liquid foods that will allow you to eat without pain.Wait until your blood sugar is under control. It's best to have surgery when your blood sugar levels are within your goal range. If your dental needs are urgent and your blood sugar is poorly controlled, talk to your dentist and physician about receiving dental treatments in a hospital.


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