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Dr. Remya Rebecca Mathew

MASLP

Speech Therapist, bangalore

9 Years Experience  ·  600 at clinic
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Dr. Remya Rebecca Mathew MASLP Speech Therapist, bangalore
9 Years Experience  ·  600 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Remya Rebecca Mathew
Dr. Remya Rebecca Mathew is an experienced Speech Therapist in Whitefield, Bangalore. She has been a practicing Speech Therapist for 9 years. She has completed MASLP . You can consult Dr. Remya Rebecca Mathew at Whitefield in Whitefield, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Remya Rebecca Mathew on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Speech Therapists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Speech Therapists with more than 28 years of experience on Lybrate.com. Find the best Speech Therapists online in Bangalore. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
MASLP - Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Manipal - 2009
Languages spoken
English

Location

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Whitefield

Maithri layout, whitefieldbangalore Get Directions
600 at clinic
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I am aged 39Y. I'm unable to speak since 12/01/2016. I have contacted ENT specialist and undergone STOBORNOSCOPY on 19/01/2016 as suggested by the doctor. The doctor has written stobornoscopy report that PHONOTARY gap is positive. Please suggest, can I able to speak or Not?

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
A positive phonatory gap means the vocal folds fail to close during phonation. A phonatory gap may be seen in patients who have muscle tension dysphonia, vocal fold paresis or paralysis, loss of tissue, or vocal fold flaccidity. Treatment aims to rectify the cause.
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When I speak in front of audience I stammer, but when I personally converse with people I speak fluently. Is it due to fear of audience that exists inside me? I even read the newspaper loudly everyday. Will that help me solve my problem?

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
Reading the newspaper loudly does help with the stammering but not with regard public speaking and its fears. This is the number one fear of all people. Even the most successful speakers admit to this problem. In fact the first 90 seconds are most frightening. The heart beat races to doubles the normal: 144 times a minute. So you are advised to prepare a good opening sentence to launch you off to a good start. The fear is generally centered around rejection: am I good enough? Will people like me? Will people know more than me? Etc. A host of self-conscious comparisons that only make you feel inferior. When the whole world is in the same boat, take heart and learn some basic techniques to overcome this stage fright. Join a Toastmasters club in your town and develop your public speaking skills and experience. Also remember some little rules: look for some pleasant face in the audience, look over the audience, prepare yourself well, talk simply, understand that you can only talk on what you know not on some grand made-up design of yours, there are always others who are better than you, pray before you speak, and so on. Focus on the three areas of public speaking according to their importance: Presentation and appearance (20%), audience (30%), and content (50%). You probably have fear from childhood that has not been resolved and is tending to find an outlet in your mouth to make it stammer. You could meet with a counselor to settle this matter. There are a lot more points but space constraints do not permit me to be more elaborate.
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I have stammering problem like repeating words. Also called NATTHI. SO is there any solution for that problem.

MBBS, cc USG
General Physician, Gurgaon
Hello, This problem can be solved by Collection of Exercises, Speech therapy, treatment and home cure 1.Exercises are effective in treatment of physiological causes of stammering. In general, exercises are meant to provide strength to the organs associated with speech including tongue, lips, jaw, trachea and lungs. Kindly consult to good speech therapy clinic 2.Deep breathing exercise are very effective 3.chewing Indian gooseberry, Almonds, Black pepper, Cinnamon and dried dates are known to clear speech congestion 4.This problem can be solved by Meditation i can give you address of rajyoga meditation center near your house (this is free of cost)
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Sir I have problem of stammering. So I face lots of problem while talking with someone. So suggest me some medicine or exercise (if any) To reduce this. Plzzz sir.

MASLP, Bachelor of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology (B.A.S.L.P)
Speech Therapist, Nashik
Hello, as reported try breathing exercises n reduce the anxiety you feel before speaking. For further contact a speech therapist nearby or online for exercises. Regards.
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I unmarried and I not drink and not use alcohol. But monthly 1-2 time Nightfalls. U speak a shahar. What is it? U mean shahid?

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
I unmarried and I not drink and not use alcohol. But monthly 1-2 time Nightfalls. U speak a shahar. What is it? U mea...
Dear lybrate-user. Welcome to lybrate. Night falls are normal and is body's normal procedure. You cannot control it and it is not unhealthy. Don't worry. Take care.
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I have speaking problem. I speak with halt. I mean stammering. Can I get rid from it?

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hello, I think speech therapy will help you and try to to repeat those words on which you stammer , means those are not clearly spoken. Take care.
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Delayed Speech And Language

D.H.L.S, B.A.S.L.P, M.A, B.Ed .SE . ( H.I )
Speech Therapist, Delhi
Delayed Speech And Language

As with other skills and milestones, the age at which kids learn language and start talking can very. Many babies happily babble" mama" and" dada" well before their first birthday, and most toddlers can say about 20 words by the time they're 18 months old. But what if a 2-year-old isn't really talking yet or only puts two words together? 

Knowing what's" normal" and what's not in speech and language development can help parents figure out if there's cause for concern or if their child is right on schedule.

How are speech and language different?

Speech is the verbal expression of language and includes articulation (the way sounds and words are formed).

Language is the entire system of giving and getting information in a meaningful way. It's understanding and being understood through communication — verbal, nonverbal, and written.

What are speech or language delays?

Speech and language problems differ, but often overlap. For example:

A child with a language delay might pronounce words well but only be able to put two words together.

A child with a speech delay might use words and phrases to express ideas but be difficult to understand.

When do kids develop speech and language skills?

The stages of speech and language development are the same for all kids, but the age at which kids develop them can vary a lot.

During routine speech therapist/ doctors look to see if kids have reached developmental milestones at these ages:

Before 12 months

By the first birthday, babies should be using their voices to relate to their environment. Cooing and babbling are early stages of speech development. At around 9 months, babies begin to string sounds together, use different tones of speech, and say words like" mama" and" dada" (without really understanding what those words mean).

Before 12 months of age, babies also should be paying attention to sound and starting to recognize names of common objects (bottle, binky, etc.). Babies who watch intently but don't react to sound could be showing signs of hearing loss

By 12 to 15 months

Kids this age should have a wide range of speech sounds in their babbling (like p, b, m, d, or n), begin to imitate sounds and words they hear, and often say one or more words (not including" mama" and" dada"). Nouns usually come first, like" baby" and" ball" they also should be able to understand and follow simple one-step directions (" please give me the toy" etc.).

From 18 to 24 months

Most (but not all) toddlers can say about 20 words by 18 months and 50 or more words by the time they turn 2. By age 2, kids are starting to combine two words to make simple sentences, such as" baby crying" or" daddy big" a 2-year-old should be able to identify common objects (in person and in pictures); point to eyes, ears, or nose when asked; and follow two-step commands (" please pick up the toy and give it to me" for example).

From 2 to 3 years

Parents often see huge gains in their child's speech. A toddler's vocabulary should increase (to too many words to count) and he or she should routinely combine three or more words into sentences.

Comprehension also should increase — by age 3, a child should begin to understand what it means to" put it on the table" or" put it under the bed" kids also should begin to identify colors and understand descriptive concepts (big versus little, for example).

What are the signs of a speech or language delay?

A baby who doesn't respond to sound or who isn't vocalizing should be seen by a doctor right away. But often, it's hard for parents to know if their child is just taking a little longer to reach a speech or language milestone, or if there's a problem that needs medical attention.

Here are some things to watch for. Call your doctor if your child:

By 12 months: isn't using gestures, such as pointing or waving bye-bye

By 18 months: prefers gestures over vocalizations to communicate

By 18 months: has trouble imitating sounds

Has trouble understanding simple verbal requests

By 2 years: can only imitate speech or actions and doesn't produce words or phrases spontaneously

By 2 years: says only certain sounds or words repeatedly and can't use oral language to communicate more than his or her immediate needs

By 2 years: can't follow simple directions

By 2 years: has an unusual tone of voice (such as raspy or nasal sounding)

Is more difficult to understand than expected for his or her age:

Parents and regular caregivers should understand about half of a child's speech at 2 years and about three quarters at 3 years.

By 4 years old, a child should be mostly understood, even by people who don't know the child.

What causes speech or language delays?

A speech delay in an otherwise normally developing child might be due to an oral impairment, like problems with the tongue or palate (the roof of the mouth). And a short frenulum (the fold beneath the tongue) can limit tongue movement for speech production.

Many kids with speech delays have oral-motor problems. These happen when there's a problem in the areas of the brain responsible for speech, making it hard to coordinate the lips, tongue, and jaw to produce speech sounds. These kids also might have other oral-motor problems, such as feeding difficulties.

Hearing problems are also commonly related to delayed speech. That's why an audiologistshould test a child's hearing whenever there's a speech concern. Kids who have trouble hearing may have trouble articulating as well as understanding, imitating, and using language.
Ear infection especially, chronic infection, can affect hearing. Simple ear infections that have been treated, though, should not affect speech. And, as long as there is normal hearing in at least one ear, speech and language will develop normally.

How are speech or language delays diagnosed?

If you or your doctor think that your child might have a problem, it's important to get an early evaluation by a speech_ language therapistyou can find a speech-language pathologist on your own, or ask your health care provider to refer you to one.

The speech-language pathologist will evaluate your child's speech and language skills within the context of total development. The pathologist will do standardized tests and look for milestones in speech and language development.

The speech-language pathologist will also assess:

What your child understands (called receptive language)

What your child can say (called expressive language)

If your child is attempting to communicate in other ways, such as pointing, head shaking, gesturing, etc.

Sound development and clarity of speech

Your child's oral-motor status (how the mouth, tongue, palate, etc, work together for speech as well as eating and swallowing)

Based on the test results, the speech-language pathologist might recommend speech therapy for your child.

How does speech therapy help?

The speech therapist will work with your child to improve speech and language skills, and show you what to do at home to help your child.

What can parents do?

Parental involvement is an important part of helping kids who have a speech or language problem.

Here are a few ways to encourage speech development at home:

Spend a lot of time communicating with your child. Even during infancy — talk, sing, and encourage imitation of sounds and gestures.

Read to your child. Start reading when your child is a baby. Look for age-appropriate soft or board books or picture books that encourage kids to look while you name the pictures. Try starting with a classic book (such as pat the bunny, in which your child imitates the patting motion) or books with textures that kids can touch. Later, let your child point to recognizable pictures and try to name them. Then move on to nursery rhymes, which have rhythmic appeal. Progress to predictable books (such as brown bear, brown bear, what do you see?) that let kids anticipate what happens. Your little one may even start to memorize favorite stories.

Use everyday situations. To reinforce your child's speech and language, talk your way through the day. For example, name foods at the grocery store, explain what you're doing as you cook a meal or clean a room, point out objects around the house, and as you drive, point out sounds you hear. Ask questions and acknowledge your child's responses (even when they're hard to understand). Keep things simple, but avoid" baby talk"

Recognizing and treating speech and language delays early on is the best approach. With proper therapy and time, your child will be better able to communicate with you and the rest of the world.

My throat is not well as I have passion of singing light n semi classical vocal. I am in age of 62 years. I wish to have advise for a medicine to get cure of laryng.

DNB (ENT), MBBS
ENT Specialist, Bangalore
Hi The vocal cords get injured with singing and prolonged speaking. Especially since aging makes them dry and weak. You need to follow something known as voice hygiene which includes drinking sips of warm water every 30 minutes along with giving voice rest for 10-15 minutes every hour. Voice must not be excessively raised or lowered and whispering must be avoided. Medicines help only when there is laryngitis. See an ent specialist for a detailed assessment and advice.
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My age is 38 years. I have stammering problem. Is there is any treatment for the same.

PDDM, MHA, MBBS
General Physician, Nashik
Stammering can be made lesser only and only by Speech therapy. So you should take the help of a speech therapist. Also, I'd suggest you to visit a Psychologist as confidence plays a great role in dealing with this problem. I'd suggest you to speak very slowly, word by word. People may make fun of this but believe me, slowly you'll get better at it. Hope your query is answered. Feel free to ask if you have any doubts. Wishing you good health.
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I feel pain in my throat and at the time of cold environment I feel more pain and my voice become very heavy please suggest me what to do because its unbearable.

BHMS
Homeopath, Raebareli
I feel pain in my throat and at the time of cold environment I feel more pain and my voice become very heavy please s...
Gargling with warm salt water is an effective way to treat a sore throat. Salt can even help kill the bacteria or virus causing pharyngitis. 1. Mix three teaspoons of salt (preferably sea salt) in two cups of warm water. 2. Gargle with this solution. Do not swallow it. Spit the water out after gargling. 3. Do this several times daily for one to two days.
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