Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Ranganath

BVSc, MVSc (Ph.D), Ph. D - Veternity

Veterinarian, Bangalore

33 Years Experience
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Ranganath BVSc, MVSc (Ph.D), Ph. D - Veternity Veterinarian, Bangalore
33 Years Experience
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

I’m dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I’m dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Ranganath
Dr. Ranganath is one of the best Veterinarians in Vijayanagar, Bangalore. He has over 33 years of experience as a Veterinarian. He is a BVSc, MVSc (Ph.D), Ph. D - Veternity . You can visit him at Vijay Veterinary Clinic in Vijayanagar, Bangalore. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Ranganath on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 41 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
BVSc - Banglore Veternary College,Banglore - 1985
MVSc (Ph.D) - Banglore Veternary College,Banglore - 1991
Ph. D - Veternity - Madras Veternary College - 1998
Languages spoken
English

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Ranganath

Vijay Veterinary Clinic

No.3461, Near Bunt Sangha, 1St F Cross, Rpc Layout West, VijayanagarBangalore Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Ranganath

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

What to do when my petbird is injured on head? What should I do? It also can't fly properly.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi lybrate-user, what type of injury on head. Is it deep or superficial. You have to take to nearest vet. First flush the injury with normal fresh water and apply betadine lotion and take to vet.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am having indian star tortoise. She is not responding properly, not opening her eyes. She is having swollen eyes, loss of appetite, sleeping all the time. please provide me solution bcoz she didn't eat anything from last 10 days.

MD - Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Vadodara
Hello Miss Khan.. we may not be able to help you here as it requires proper check up... You may need to go to a veternary doctor nearby.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Why do Puppies Need Deworming?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Intestinal parasites such as roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and whip-worms are common among young puppies and kittens. All puppies should be given a dewormer for easily-prevented illness caused by these parasites. Read more about how to prevent parasites in your dog or cat

Common intestinal parasites in dogs and cats

You've probably heard the names before

1. Roundworms, 2. Hookworms, 3. Whip-worms and 4. Tapeworms. These are the intestinal parasites most often seen in pets, and each of them can harm your dog or cat in unique ways.

Symptoms of intestinal parasites in pets
While worms are usually found in puppies and kittens, infection can occur in dogs and cats of all ages. Signs of an intestinal parasite infection can include:
Diarrhoea
Vomiting
Weight loss
Swollen stomach
Anemia
Death (in severe infestations)

Note that these signs can also be associated with other diseases so if you observe any of them, you should take your pet in to see your veterinarian for an examination. Diagnosing an intestinal parasite infection is usually done through a laboratory analysis of your pet’s faeces.
De-worming has become a controversial subject.
Developing de-worming strategies requires consideration of a several different things, including:
• What parasites are in the area?
• Are the risks the same all year round or are they seasonal?
• What parasites pose a risk to an individual pet or what are the pet’s chances of exposure? (e.g. Does the pet go outside? Is it exposed to many other animals? Are there multiple pets in the household?)
• Are there any people in the household at particular risk for parasitic infections? (e.g. young children, people with developmental disorders that might be more likely to be exposed to pet faeces?)
Everyone agrees puppies and kittens need more aggressive de-worming, but there are a few different approaches to managing de-worming in adult animals.
So as far as myself consider regular de-worming in these schedules:
STAGE ONE
Puppy de-worming: (age 40 days – 120 days) preferably suspension
(I don’t recommend de-worming puppies before 30 days as it may affect their nutritional absorption mechanism and reduce the immunity level, while they are feeding with the dam I think they are well protected. )
1. Puppy at the age of 40-60 days while doing the primary vaccine
2. Next second dose at the booster stage around 15 days from the first dose i.e. around 55 days – 75 days.
3. Third dose is at 90-120 days
STAGE TWO
Puppies at 120-180 Days of age: preferably tablet
De-worming around 180 days is preferable and do consult with your vets for specific drug of choice depending up on breed and their nature of infection they have
STAGE THREE:
Semi adult dogs 180 – 360 days: preferably tablets
In this period you can de-worm the puppy either once in 2 months if you have a group or pack of dogs or you can once in three months if you have just one dog with you
STAGE FOUR:
Adult dogs anything above 360 days
Once in every 3 months i.e.. yearly four times is the recommended Schedule for Asia
BITCH IN HEAT: special condition
Should be de-wormed at 4- 5 th day of heat and repeat dosage at 9-10th day second dose and third and final dose is after whelping and after the milking period stops i.e. after whelping 60 days apart best way to maintain the breeding bitch as per standards
Choosing the right dewormer for your dog
There are many different types and brands of de-wormers on the MARKET: and determining which dewormer to use, whether to administer it by pill or liquid, and at what dose can depend on a lot of factors.
Knowing which dewormer to use and at what dose can depend on a variety of things such as the type of intestinal parasite present, and the age, size and current health of your pet. Aside from reading the labels on de-worming products, it’s important to discuss the options and your dog’s unique needs with your veterinarian first.
Your veterinarian can recommend a product that’s appropriate for your pet after a diagnosis has been made of the type and species of the parasite. In addition, some medications can also be used to help control intestinal parasites. Considering that some parasites can infect people as well as pets, certain de-wormers may be used as a preventive measure to decrease the risk to humans.
4 people found this helpful

My dog is vomiting continuously? He vomited yesterday morning and was OK entire day. He ate haven samagri, today he is vomiting continuously.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Plz do not gv any medicine or any solid food for another 24 hrs. Give only fresh water. Fluffy will b fine.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a 13 years old pomeranian bitch. She had stopped eating since a few weeks. On getting her blood tested and sonography, reports say that her kidney is weak and urea level is high. What should I do?

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc.-Pathology
Veterinarian, Bangalore
With the age the dogs kidney starts losing its functional ability. So now all you have to do is managemental and supportive therapy. Changes in the feed like giving renal diet and phosphate binders has to be followed. If the dog is still not taking food, better to go for fluid therapy.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a pug and he's just 28 days old. I got him on 29th November Since then I am feeding him with cerelac thrice a day. But from yesterday onwards he's suffering from loose motions. What should I do?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
I have a pug and he's just 28 days old. I got him on 29th November Since then I am feeding him with cerelac thrice a ...
Hi lybrate-user, stop feeding your pug with cerelac. Give cold milk or butter milk what ever it likes, provide more water. Give rest for 2-3 days. Do not force him to eat for 2-3 days. Problem will solve.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

1 person found this helpful

My 3 year old labrador retreiver is suffering with itches all over his body. What could be the reason for this?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Reason may an infection please send from mange to mite and fungal to viral please sent close up shots to identify the cause
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed