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Dr. Ramesh

MBBS

Pediatrician, Bangalore

150 - 250 at clinic
Dr. Ramesh MBBS Pediatrician, Bangalore
150 - 250 at clinic
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To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Ramesh
Dr. Ramesh is a renowned Pediatrician in Laggere, Bangalore. He is a MBBS . You can consult Dr. Ramesh at Jaya Clinic in Laggere, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Ramesh and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Pediatricians in India. You will find Pediatricians with more than 35 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Pediatricians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Jaya Clinic

#400/9, 2nd Cross, 17th Main, 4th Block, Nandini Layout. Landmark: Near Achary Sri Mahapragya High School, and Near Ganapathi TempleBangalore Get Directions
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Arunodaya Hospital

#18-23, 4th&5th Cross, Mallasandra Main Road, Hessaraghatta Road, T Dasarahalli. Landmark: Near Bagalgunte Bus Stop.Bangalore Get Directions
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Hello sir, my son is of 2.5 years old. He often get stuffy nose and cough immediately which lasts for 3 days of severity in cough with wheezing. He will be hospitalized to reduce that, this happens sometimes more frequently in about 10-15 days. No doctor has said the exact reason, I am much worried about that cough as that will be continuously dry cough and he can't even speak.please help

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), F.I.A.M.S. (Pediatrics)
Pediatrician, Muzaffarnagar
Hello sir, my son is of 2.5 years old. He often get stuffy nose and cough immediately which lasts for 3 days of sever...
It appears if your son is suffering from asthma. For acute illness, hospitalization becomes necessary. You may add vit. A 60.000 units daily for a week which may reduce severity of illness.
1 person found this helpful
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Dyslexia - 9 Signs That Your Kid is Suffering from it!

Consultant Dyslexia, Autism & Child Psychologist. Consultant Clinical & Mental Health Psychologist., Post Masters Doc in Behavioural Medicine , Post Masters Doc Psychology
Psychologist, Noida
Dyslexia - 9 Signs That Your Kid is Suffering from it!

Raising a child with dyslexia can stir up a lot of emotions. You may look ahead and wonder if this learning issue will affect your child's future. But dyslexia is not a prediction of failure. Dyslexia is quite common, and many successful individuals have dyslexia.

Research has proven that there are different ways of teaching that can help people with dyslexia succeed. There's a lot you can do as a parent too.

What are the symptoms of dyslexia?

Because dyslexia affects some people more severely than others, your child's symptoms may look different from those in another child. Some kids with dyslexia have trouble with reading and spelling. Others may struggle to write or to tell left from right.

Dyslexia can also make it difficult for people to express themselves clearly. It can be hard for them to structure their thoughts during conversation. They may have trouble finding the right words to say.

Others struggle to understand what they're hearing. This is especially true when someone uses nonliteral language such as jokes and sarcasm.

The signs you see may also look different at various ages. Some of the warning signs for dyslexia, such as a speech delay, appear before a child reaches kindergarten. More often, though, dyslexia is identified in grade school. As schoolwork gets more demanding, trouble processing language becomes more apparent.

Here are some signs to look out for:

  1. Warning Signs in Preschool or Kindergarten
  2. Has trouble recognizing the letters of the alphabet
  3. Struggles to match letters to sounds, such as not knowing what sounds b or h make
  4. Has difficulty blending sounds into words, such as connecting C-H-A-T to the word chat
  5. Struggles to pronounce words correctly, such as saying 'mawn lower' instead of 'lawn mower'
  6. Has difficulty learning new words
  7. Has a smaller vocabulary than other kids the same age
  8. Has trouble learning to count or say the days of the week and other common word sequences
  9. Has trouble rhyming

Warning Signs in Grade School or Middle School

  1. Struggles with reading and spelling
  2. Confuses the order of letters, such as writing 'left' instead of 'felt'
  3. Has trouble remembering facts and numbers
  4. Has difficulty gripping a pencil
  5. Has difficulty using proper grammar
  6. Has trouble learning new skills and relies heavily on memorization
  7. Gets tripped up by word problems in math
  8. Has a tough time sounding out unfamiliar words
  9. Has trouble following a sequence of directions

Warning Signs in High School

  1. Struggles with reading out loud
  2. Doesn't read at the expected grade level
  3. Has trouble understanding jokes or idioms
  4. Has difficulty organizing and managing time
  5. Struggles to summarize a story
  6. Has difficulty learning a foreign language

Skills that are affected by Dyslexia

Dyslexia doesn't just affect reading and writing. Here are some everyday skills and activities your child may be struggling with because of this learning issue:

General:

  1. Appears bright, highly intelligent, and articulate but unable to read, write, or spell at grade level.
  2. Labelled lazy, dumb, careless, immature, "not trying hard enough," or "behavior problem."
  3. Isn't "behind enough" or "bad enough" to be helped in the school setting.
  4. High in IQ, yet may not test well academically; tests well orally, but not written.
  5. Feels dumb; has poor self-esteem; hides or covers up weaknesses with ingenious compensatory strategies; easily frustrated and emotional about school reading or testing.
  6. Talented in art, drama, music, sports, mechanics, story-telling, sales, business, designing, building, or engineering.
  7. Seems to "Zone out" or daydream often; gets lost easily or loses track of time.
  8. Difficulty sustaining attention; seems "hyper" or "daydreamer."
  9. Learns best through hands-on experience, demonstrations, experimentation, observation, and visual aids.

Vision, Reading, and Spelling Skills:

  1. Complains of dizziness, headaches or stomach aches while reading.
  2. Confused by letters, numbers, words, sequences, or verbal explanations.
  3. Reading or writing shows repetitions, additions, transpositions, omissions, substitutions, and reversals in letters, numbers and/or words.
  4. Complains of feeling or seeing non-existent movement while reading, writing, or copying.
  5. Seems to have difficulty with vision, yet eye exams don't reveal a problem.
  6. Extremely keen sighted and observant, or lacks depth perception and peripheral vision.

Reads and rereads with little comprehension:

  1. Spells phonetically and inconsistently.
  2. Hearing and Speech Skills
  3. Has extended hearing; hears things not said or apparent to others; easily distracted by sounds.
  4. Difficulty putting thoughts into words; speaks in halting phrases; leaves sentences incomplete; stutters under stress; mispronounces long words, or transposes phrases, words, and syllables when speaking.

Writing and Motor Skills:

  1. Trouble with writing or copying; pencil grip is unusual; handwriting varies or is illegible.
  2. Clumsy, uncoordinated, poor at ball or team sports; difficulties with fine and/or gross motor skills and tasks; prone to motion-sickness.
  3. Can be ambidextrous, and often confuses left/right, over/under.
  4. Math and Time Management Skills
  5. Has difficulty telling time, managing time, learning sequenced information or tasks, or being on time.
  6. Computing math shows dependence on finger counting and other tricks; knows answers, but can't do it on paper.
  7. Can count, but has difficulty counting objects and dealing with money.
  8. Can do arithmetic, but fails word problems; cannot grasp algebra or higher math.

Memory and Cognition:

  1. Excellent long-term memory for experiences, locations, and faces.
  2. Poor memory for sequences, facts and information that has not been experienced.
  3. Thinks primarily with images and feeling, not sounds or words (little internal dialogue).
  4. Behavior, Health, Development and Personality
  5. Extremely disorderly or compulsively orderly.
  6. Can be class clown, trouble-maker, or too quiet.
  7. Had unusually early or late developmental stages (talking, crawling, walking, tying shoes).
  8. Prone to ear infections; sensitive to foods, additives, and chemical products.
  9. Can be an extra deep or light sleeper; bedwetting beyond appropriate age.
  10. Unusually high or low tolerance for pain.
  11. Strong sense of justice; emotionally sensitive; strives for perfection.

What can be done at home for dyslexia?

Helping your child with dyslexia can be a challenge, particularly if you're never been confident in your own reading and writing skills. But you don't have to be an expert to help work on certain skills or strengthen your child's self-esteem.

Keep in mind that kids (and families) are all different, so not all options will work for you. Don't panic if the first strategies you try aren't effective. You may need to try several approaches to find what works best for your child. Here are some things you can try at home:

  • Read out loud every day
  • Tap into your child's interests
  • Use audiobooks
  • Look for apps and other high-tech help
  • Focus on effort, not outcome
  • Make your home reader-friendly
  • Boost confidence

What can make the journey easier?

Dyslexia can present challenges for your child and for you. But with the proper support, almost all people with dyslexia can become accurate readers. Your involvement will help tremendously.

Wherever you are in your journey, whether you're just starting out or are well on your way, this site can help you find more ways to support your child. Here are a few things that can help make the journey easier:

  • Connect with other parents. Remember that you're not alone. Use our safe online community to find parents like you.
  • Get behavior advice. Parenting Coach offers expert-approved strategies on a variety of issues that can affect children with dyslexia, including trouble with time management, anxiety and fear, frustration and low self-esteem.
  • Build a support plan. Come up with a game plan and anticipate what lies ahead.

Understanding dyslexia and looking for ways to help your child is an important first step. There's a lot you can do just don't feel you have to do everything all at once. Pace yourself. If you try a bunch of strategies at the same time, it might be hard to figure out which ones are working. And do your best to stay positive. Your love and support can make a big difference in your child's life. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a neurologist and ask a free question.

2612 people found this helpful

Are there any long-term effects associated with Taking ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity Disorder) medications? If so, what are they and What medications are implicated?

Doctor of Medicine
General Physician, Surat
Yes, anti-psychiatric drug have some bad side effects if taken for long term, and it is advisable to come out of this condition rather than trying some pharmaceutical agents, there are ways for this like counselling and others.
2 people found this helpful
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Hello doctor my baby is of four months and 10 days. He was very good by his health till but now he is loosing weight he gets thin is it ok or something?

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Jaipur
Hello doctor my baby is of four months and 10 days. He was very good by his health till but now he is loosing weight ...
This is the time to start semisolids in addition to breast milk, gradually breast milk to be stopped & replaced by solid diet.
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My nephew is 8 year old and he is diagnosed with Autism. He was diagnosed at the age of 3 years. At that time he was not able to stand on his own, avoids eye contacts, irritates and bites his own hand. He is now getting treatment from a Hakim in Muradnagar, Ghaziabad from last 3 years. He is now able to walk on his own but not able to speak or behave normally. He still bites his hand very often in anger. He wants to be alone but likes her parents company, now responds to her parents when they call him. Please help, if somebody knows the medicine or treatment of Autism.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
Early diagnosis and treatment helps young children with autism develop to their full potential. The primary goal of treatment is to improve the overall ability of the child to function. Symptoms and behaviors of autism can combine in many ways and vary in severity. Also, individual symptoms and behaviors often change over time. For these reasons, treatment strategies are tailored to individual needs and available family resources. But in general children with autism respond best to highly structured and specialized treatment. A program that addresses helping parents and improving communication, social, behavioral, adaptive, and learning aspects of a child's life will be most successful. The american academy of pediatrics (aap) recommends the following strategies for helping a child to improve overall function and reach his or her potential: 6 behavioral training and managementbehavioral training and management. Behavioral training and management uses positive reinforcement, self-help, and social skills training to improve behavior and communication. Many types of treatments have been developed, including applied behavioral analysis (aba), treatment and education of autistic and related communication handicapped children (teacch), and sensory integration. Specialized therapies. These include speech, occupational, and physical therapy. These therapies are important components of managing autism and should all be included in various aspects of the child's treatment program. Speech therapy can help a child with autism improve language and social skills to communicate more effectively. Occupational and physical therapy can help improve any deficiencies in coordination and motor skills. Occupational therapy may also help a child with autism to learn to process information from the senses (sight, sound, hearing, touch, and smell) in more manageable ways. Medicinesmedicines. Medicines are most commonly used to treat related conditions and problem behaviors, including depression, anxiety, hyperactivity, and obsessive-compulsive behaviors. Community support and parent trainingcommunity support and parent training. Talk to your doctor or contact an advocacy group for support and training.
1 person found this helpful
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My baby is 4 months old . I hv started giving him cerelac. Wat is other better option ? Cn you give fruits ? If yes shud it b cooked b4 giving or is it okay to jus blend it in mixer?

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
My baby is 4 months old . I hv started giving him cerelac. Wat is other better option ? Cn you give fruits ? If yes s...
Hello, your baby is very young to start something solid food. He must be on mother's feed now. But if you have started giving him cerelac then it should a liquid preparation. When your baby completes 6 months then only you should start top food. Take care.
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Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Children

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Attention-Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Children

What is ADHD?

ADHD, also called attention-deficit disorder, is a behavior disorder, usually first diagnosed in childhood, that is characterized by inattention, impulsivity, and, in some cases, hyperactivity. These symptoms usually occur together; however, one may occur without the other(s).

The symptoms of hyperactivity, when present, are almost always apparent by the age of 7 and may be present in very young preschoolers. Inattention or attention-deficit may not be evident until a child faces the expectations of elementary school.

What are the different types of ADHD?

Three major types of ADHD include the following:

  • ADHD, combined type. This, the most common type of ADHD, is characterized by impulsive and hyperactive behaviors as well as inattention and distractibility.

  • ADHD, impulsive/hyperactive type. This, the least common type of ADHD, is characterized by impulsive and hyperactive behaviors without inattention and distractibility.

  • ADHD, inattentive and distractible type. This type of ADHD is characterized predominately by inattention and distractibility without hyperactivity.

What causes attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

ADHD is one of the most researched areas in child and adolescent mental health. However, the precise cause of the disorder is still unknown. Available evidence suggests that ADHD is genetic. It is a brain-based biological disorder. Low levels of dopamine (a brain chemical), which is a neurotransmitter (a type of brain chemical), are found in children with ADHD. Brain imaging studies using PET scanners (positron emission tomography; a form of brain imaging that makes it possible to observe the human brain at work) show that brain metabolism in children with ADHD is lower in the areas of the brain that control attention, social judgment, and movement.

Who is affected by attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

Estimates suggest that about 4% to 12% of children have ADHD. Boys are 2 to 3 times more likely to have ADHD of the hyperactive or combined type than girls.

Many parents of children with ADHD experienced symptoms of ADHD when they were younger. ADHD is commonly found in brothers and sisters within the same family. Most families seek help when their child's symptoms begin to interfere with learning and adjustment to the expectations of school and age-appropriate activities.

What are the symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?

The following are the most common symptoms of ADHD. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. The 3 categories of symptoms of ADHD include the following:

  • Inattention:

    • Short attention span for age (difficulty sustaining attention)

    • Difficulty listening to others

    • Difficulty attending to details

    • Easily distracted

    • Forgetfulness

    • Poor organizational skills for age

    • Poor study skills for age

  • Impulsivity:

    • Often interrupts others

    • Has difficulty waiting for his or her turn in school and/or social games

    • Tends to blurt out answers instead of waiting to be called upon

    • Takes frequent risks, and often without thinking before acting

  • Hyperactivity:

    • Seems to be in constant motion; runs or climbs, at times with no apparent goal except motion

    • Has difficulty remaining in his/her seat even when it is expected

    • Fidgets with hands or squirms when in his or her seat; fidgeting excessively

    • Talks excessively

    • Has difficulty engaging in quiet activities

    • Loses or forgets things repeatedly and often

    • Inability to stay on task; shifts from one task to another without bringing any to completion

The symptoms of ADHD may resemble other medical conditions or behavior problems. Keep in mind that many of these symptoms may occur in children and teens who do not have ADHD. A key element in diagnosis is that the symptoms must significantly impair adaptive functioning in both home and school environments. Always consult your child's doctor for a diagnosis.

How is attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosed?

ADHD is the most commonly diagnosed behavior disorder of childhood. A pediatrician, child psychiatrist, or a qualified mental health professional usually identifies ADHD in children. A detailed history of the child's behavior from parents and teachers, observations of the child's behavior, and psychoeducational testing contribute to making the diagnosis of ADHD. Because ADHD is a group of symptoms, diagnosis depends on evaluating results from several different sources, including physical, neurological, and psychological testing. Certain tests may be used to rule out other conditions, and some may be used to test intelligence and certain skill sets. Consult your child's doctor for more information.

Treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Specific treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder will be determined by your child's doctor based on:

  • Your child's age, overall health, and medical history

  • Extent of your child's symptoms

  • Your child's tolerance for specific medications or therapies

  • Expectations for the course of the condition

  • Your opinion or preference

Major components of treatment for children with ADHD include parental support and education in behavioral training, appropriate school placement, and medication. Treatment with a psychostimulant is highly effective in most children with ADHD.

Treatment may include:

  • Psychostimulant medications. These medications are used for their ability to balance chemicals in the brain that prohibit the child from maintaining attention and controlling impulses. They help "stimulate" or help the brain to focus and may be used to reduce the major characteristics of ADHD.
    Medications that are commonly used to treat ADHD include the following:

    • Methylphenidate (Ritalin, Metadate, Concerta, Methylin)

    • Dextroamphetamine (Dexedrine, Dextrostat)

    • A mixture of amphetamine salts (Adderall)

    • Atomoxetine (Strattera). A nonstimulant SNRI (selective serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor) medication with benefits for related mood symptoms. 

    • Lisdexamfetamine (Vyvanse)

    Psychostimulants have been used to treat childhood behavior disorders since the 1930s and have been widely studied. Traditional immediate release stimulants take effect in the body quickly, work for 1 to 4 hours, and then are eliminated from the body. Many long-acting stimulant medications are also available, lasting 8 to 9 hours, and requiring 1 daily dosing. Doses of stimulant medications need to be timed to match the child's school schedule to help the child pay attention for a longer period of time and improve classroom performance. The common side effects of stimulants may include, but are not limited to, the following:

    • Insomnia

    • Decreased appetite

    • Stomach aches

    • Headaches

    • Jitteriness

    • Rebound activation (when the effect of the stimulant wears off, hyperactive and impulsive behaviors may increase for a short period of time)

    Most side effects of stimulant use are mild, decrease with regular use, and respond to dose changes. Always discuss potential side effects with your child's doctor.

    Antidepressant medications may also be administered for children and adolescents with ADHD to help improve attention while decreasing aggression, anxiety, and/or depression.

  • Psychosocial treatments. Parenting children with ADHD may be difficult and can present challenges that create stress within the family. Classes in behavior management skills for parents can help reduce stress for all family members. Training in behavior management skills for parents usually occurs in a group setting which encourages parent-to-parent support. Behavior management skills may include the following:

    • Point systems

    • Contingent attention (responding to the child with positive attention when desired behaviors occur; withholding attention when undesired behaviors occur)

    Teachers may also be taught behavior management skills to use in the classroom setting. Training for teachers usually includes use of daily behavior reports that communicate in-school behaviors to parents.

    Behavior management techniques tend to improve targeted behaviors (such as completing school work or keeping the child's hands to himself or herself), but are not usually helpful in reducing overall inattention, hyperactivity, or impulsivity.

Prevention of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Preventive measures to reduce the incidence of ADHD in children are not known at this time. However, early detection and intervention can reduce the severity of symptoms, decrease the interference of behavioral symptoms on school functioning, enhance the child's normal growth and development, and improve the quality of life experienced by children or adolescents with ADHD.

1 person found this helpful

Yesterday I came to know my 7 month old baby is suffering from asthma.in that case please help me what precautions shud I take for him. Shud I give him oil massage and bath.in food any precaution shud I take. He is still on breast feeding too.

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Allergist/Immunologist, Kollam
Dear lybrate-user your baby is suffering from virus induced wheeze which needs daily oral montelukast. And inhaled budecort for at least 6 weeks. Avoid cold bath and cows milk. Formula milk. Citrus fruits. Nuts far as possible as this may increase the wheeze. Kindly do a chest xray and complete blood counts to rule out lower respiratory infection. Tb screen ing mantoux test. Gastric afb if h/o of contact with tb.
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Attention Deficit Disorders

MBBS, DPM (Psychiatry)
Psychiatrist, Thrissur
Attention Deficit Disorders

CHILD PSYCHIATRY: Attention Deficit Disorders

Attention deficit disorder is characterized by the main features of distractibility, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. It occurs in both children and adults, and interferes with the person's ability to function normally in their day-to-day activities, such as work, school, and at home. While we do not yet fully understand the causes behind these problems, there are many readily available and effective treatments for attention deficit problems.
Diagnosing this disorder can be difficult since it is common for many people to have some of the symptoms of this disorder to some degree, such as difficulty paying attention or being easily distracted. Also, some of the symptoms of ADHD can manifest as anxiety or depression. Therefore, prevalence rates for this disorder are difficult to precisely pin down. However, according to recent epidemiological statistics, approximately 4 percent of the population has ADHD. About one-half to two-thirds of children who are diagnosed will continue to have some difficulties with ADHD during their adulthood.

The diagnosis of ADHD or ADD cannot be done online. This informational resource can help you better understand these problems and give you more confidence when contacting a mental health professional for appropriate treatment.

It is normal for children to be easily distracted at various stages throughout their development for short periods of time. Most children grow out of such stages naturally on their own. Do not become alarmed if you find that you or your child may match many of the symptoms listed -- this is likely one of the most overly diagnosed mental health problems today.

In order for ADHD or ADD to be diagnosed properly, it is important that the problems to be noted happen in multiple settings, that they have been consistently observed for 6 months or longer, and that many such symptoms of lack of attention, impulsivity, or hyperactivity are easily apparent.

We have developed the information here to act as a comprehensive guide to help you better understand the symptoms, causes, and treatments for attention deficit problems, whether you're an adult or a child. We've developed this resource to help you discover more information about these problems on your own.
manifest themselves in a manner and degree that is inconsistent with the child's current developmental level. That is, the child's behavior is significantly more inattentive or hyperactive than that of his or her peers of a similar age.

Attention deficit disorder (with or without hyperactivity) is known by a cluster of co-occurring behavioral symptoms. Check to see if any of these symptoms sound familiar to you.
ADHD or ADD is characterized by a majority of the following symptoms being present in either category (inattention or hyperactivity). These symptoms need to manifest themselves in a manner and degree that is inconsistent with the child's current developmental level. That is, the child's behavior is significantly more inattentive or hyperactive than that of his or her peers of a similar age.

Symptoms of Inattention:
§ often fails to give close attention to details or makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work, or other activities
§ often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
§ often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
§ often does not follow through on instructions and fails to finish schoolwork, chores, or duties in the workplace (not due to oppositional behavior or failure to understand instructions)
§ often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities
§ often avoids, dislikes, or is reluctant to engage in tasks that require sustained mental effort (such as schoolwork or homework)
§ often loses things necessary for tasks or activities (e.g., toys, school assignments, pencils, books, or tools)
§ is often easily distracted by extraneous stimuli
§ is often forgetful in daily activities
Symptoms of Hyperactivity:
§ often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat
§ often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected
§ often runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate (in adolescents or adults, may be limited to subjective feelings of restlessness)
§ often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly
§ is often "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor"
§ often talks excessively
Symptoms of Impulsivity:
§ often blurts out answers before questions have been completed
§ often has difficulty awaiting turn
§ often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations or games)
Symptoms must have persisted for at least 6 months. Some of these symptoms need to have been present as a child, at 7 years old or younger. The symptoms also must exist in at least two separate settings (for example, at school and at home). The symptoms should be creating significant impairment in social, academic or occupational functioning or relationships.
There are three variations in which this disorder is diagnosed.
§ Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Combined Type: when both criteria for A1 and A2 are met for the past 6 months.
§ Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Predominantly Inattentive Type: when criterion A1 is met but Criterion A2 is not met for the past 6 months.
§ Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive Type: when criterion A2 is met but criterion A1 is not met for the past 6 months.

1 person found this helpful

My daughter is just 2 months old. She has a preference for putting her head towards the right side. While I turn it to the left every now and then, she keeps it there for a short while and turns back to her right. I'm now noticing a slight difference in the shape on the left and right. She doesn't like to use a horse shoe pillow and gets rashes with the mustard seed pillow. Will the shape of her head become permanent as it is now or will it change and get well rounded once she's sitting up and moving around more. I have received mixed responses to this, hence wanted to check.

Diploma in Child Health (DCH), MBBS
Pediatrician,
My daughter is just 2 months old. She has a preference for putting her head towards the right side. While I turn it t...
Don't worry. Its because of the shape. Try to keep her head depends upon all sides. U can do one thing put some pillow or something which keeps it head opposite side. Also during day time when she awake keep bright colours toy or things on side left. So she keep seeing on that and rotate it to all side. She is just 2 months so not to worry about shape of head as head bones are still not fused which will fuse at around 1-1.5 yrs,but try this things if still shape become unequal then other methods are there.
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I am having a baby boy six months 22 days old he is having a PDA size 3mm and having shrinkage in one of his bicuspid valve in heart. Is there possibility that PDA can be filled on its own. Kindly suggest what is required to be done.

MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Ghaziabad
I am having a baby boy six months 22 days old he is having a PDA size 3mm and having shrinkage in one of his bicuspid...
Dear , since your child is almost 7 months old, there is no chance that his pda will close spontaneously. Also, you have mentioned some defect in his bicuspid valve. If left untreated, both may have serious repurcussions. You must consult a paediatric cardiologist and proceed according to his advice. The treatment may involve surgery or a interventional cardiologist.
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My kid is facing motion problem from last one month and also dejection is very less. Can you suggest what will be solutions for this. Thanks

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
My kid is facing motion problem from last one month and also dejection is very less. Can you suggest what will be sol...
YOu have not mentioned age of your child and if it is constipation you have to check thyroid and feed fiber containing diet and fruits and give water plenty
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One lady if stopping the feeding their child then what is precaution required to lady.

MBBS, MD
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
Nothing much. It should be gradual withdrawal for child and mother. Child should be made to ear|drink thin soup. Gradual withdrawal will not bring breast discomfort.
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Hi. My son is having tie tongue. He is 3.5 years old. My query is what is the correct age to treat it? What is the correct way to treat it? Is there any other complications in it? What kind of specialist doctor needed to treat it? Pediatric or ENT?

MBBS, MD
Pediatrician, Gurgaon
When child can not take out the tongue and have spongy franum below tongue to connect base of pharynx we call it tongue tie. Well if you thing child doesnot speek because of tongue tie. You are wrong. Because we do not speak by tongue. Tongue is for taste and propell the food backwards.
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We have six months old baby. Currently he is at my in-laws' place with my wife. I am planning to bring my family to Bangalore. We have a question regarding buffalo milk feeding. As we get the milk from a dairy here, is it ok to feed him this milk. My wife's milk production is not much, please advise on what things to take care regarding feeding our baby. Thanks in advance.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
We have six months old baby. Currently he is at my in-laws' place with my wife. I am planning to bring my family to B...
It is OK. As for choosing between cow’s milk and buffalo milk, cow’s milk is a better option to start with, as buffalo milk is rich in fat and difficult to digest. Indigestion can lead to diarrhea. While introducing milk, start by adding a few teaspoons of the pasteurized milk to soups, halwa and some room-temperature curd. If he/she tolerates this well, then over time the quantity can be increased with careful monitoring. When introducing buffalo milk, mothers must first boil the milk, let it cool and then remove the layer of cream before feeding the baby.
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Can we give bornvita to six month old baby with milk to develop the taste as he is not take milk with bottle

Pediatrician, Pune
No, avoid giving milk with bottle, breast feeding is the best for the baby till 1 year of age, weaning with rice water, light moong dal can be given.
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I have myometrial fibriods, do these fibroid cause hindrance to pregnancy . One is located in uterine fundal region and another with in the posterior myometrium uterine body

MBBS (Gold Medalist, Hons), MS (Obst and Gynae- Gold Medalist), DNB (Obst and Gynae), Fellow- Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (ACOG, USA), FIAOG
Gynaecologist, Kolkata
Mere fibroid does not always hinder pregnancy. The treatment of fibroid depends on symptoms (menstrual problems), tubal function, husband's semen etc. I personally try to treat fibroids with medicine except in extreme cases where surgery may be needed.
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Hi I have baby who is one year old. Yesterday he was having red throat. So doctor suggested him timnik, ibugesic and FloraBS but today he is having severe cough. Please suggest what can be given in severe Dry cough.

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health (DCH), Pediatric Gastroenterology
Pediatrician, Delhi
Hi I have baby who is one year old.
Yesterday he was having red throat. So doctor suggested him timnik, ibugesic and ...
A one year old, with severe cough should not be taken lightly. Please have the child reviewed by your doctor again as the baby might need some antibiotic specially if he has fever also. Other wise in mild viral infections, the above mentioned drug are usually enough. I prefer giving paracetamol to a child rather than ibugesic syrup for fever and pain.
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My baby had gastritis last week. Now no vomiting but still he is not eating anything now. Rest things are normal like poop and all. I am worried his health. He is one year old. Please help. Me.

M.D.( Pediatrics), DCH
Pediatrician,
What is his weight like? if in normal range and if he is playing well, just relax. He will eat normally in 4-5 days time, till them offer him food along with you at breakfast, lunch, dinner and 2-3 times more.
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