Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Book
Call

Dr. Rahmatullah Sharif

Veterinarian, Bangalore

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Rahmatullah Sharif Veterinarian, Bangalore
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Feed
Services

Personal Statement

I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Rahmatullah Sharif
Dr. Rahmatullah Sharif is one of the best Veterinarians in Koramangala, Bangalore. He is currently practising at Cartman Veterinary Society in Koramangala, Bangalore. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Rahmatullah Sharif on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 27 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Languages spoken
English

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Rahmatullah Sharif

Cartman Veterinary Society

870, 17th E Main, 6th Block, Koramangala, Near Jyothi Niwas CollegeBangalore Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Rahmatullah Sharif

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

My Dog name is bruzoo, my dog is labera. he is very week and my dog is nothing eat like food pedigree and my dog leg is very slim. Please help me.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You can start giving high nutritious diet to you dog like egg, chicken paneer etc. You can give him good quality feed like pedigree professional or royal canin for growth.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a dog. Who is 2 month old. So I want to know about her food & diet? As she vomits vry frequently aftr eating anything.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Just give soft gruel kind of food n check. Like cerelac etc. If vilomiting immediately without squeezing the stomach, that means your puppy has megaesophagus. Which is not good.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My 2 month old puppy seems very dazed and disoriented after a week's treatment of Melonex 5mg. He's falling again and again in sleep. Really worried Kindly help

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please taken to vet and rule out parvo viral infection and start fluids immediately as puppy wont survive much as there body weight is very poor.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Please Suggest something for my 2.5 months old german shepherd for a shiny coat. Its coat is dull and rough although I brush it regularly and feed him non veg and roti with curd. Please. Suggest some home made food not pedigree or market items if possible.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please give him fish oil and also possible food of hills science plan large breed puppy food all the time as per the standards. With dog food you cant acheive these things as they require 20 times more protien than human as the growth rate of dog is higer they attain weight of 30-40 kg in just 12 months were as human it takes more years normally (diet contains what we need) and 10 times more fat and 15 times vitamins and omega fatty acids for hairy breeds. Its then upto you to change you r mind set in feeding your pet.
5 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi. 5 days before my dog died Without any symptoms. In my village nearly 30 dogs died within 10 days. Can you please tell what may be the reason.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
Hi, the reason may be silent form of rabies. If one dog effected, the other dogs also may be effected. Or if any food poisoning at the same place. Check once. Or take one to nearest vet for proper diagnosis.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My pet is pregnant its lab please advice us what to do & about food also give us a tips.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Bareilly
Dear , you may give calcium and iron tablet orally and any symptoms shows then please consult your near by vet.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My dog actually got a tumor just below it's rib. My dog is not feeling any pain when I touch the tumour I am afraid please help what medication should be taken.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Kolkata
Surgery could be required. But before surgery there are many things (investigations, medications etc.) needed to covered up. Consult accordingly.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My dog just bite me but he's fully vaccines! Should I do anything or anything will happen?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
As long as your pet has received yearly rabies vaccines and he is disease free - nothing should happen to you. Its however wise to show your bite wound to a human physician and take his opinion. Take care.
11 people found this helpful

I have bought a 35 days old labrador puppy, can you please tell me what to feed him, I fed him cerelac but now he is having loose motion, also tell how to cure it.

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science)
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Loosies. Need to be treated urgently rush him to a vet. Food. Lactol milk powder starter. Dry puppy food. Brand. Natural and delicious.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My one and a half month old lab puppy is suffering from loose motions, is vomiting and not eating anything since yesterday. He is not vaccinated yet. Local vet has given dextrose saline and polybion injection. There is no improvement in his condition. Please help.

NCCH & MCH
Homeopath, Kolkata
Kindly give Ipecac 30 six pills crushed and mix with 1 tsf of water to make a dose and give three times every hourly and then stop again after 3 hr give one more dose and give a follow-up thereafter.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
20 people found this helpful

brushing your dog and oral hygiene

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

1. The Breath Test

Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

2. Lip Service

Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

3. Signs of Oral Disease

The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

Bad breath
Excessive drooling
Inflamed gums
Tumors in the gums
Cysts under the tongue
Loose teeth
4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
7. Brushing Technique

Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
9. Chew on This

chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
14 people found this helpful

Hi, My Lab is 8 years old. And now she has started to Limp on her right leg. I dont know if she is in pain. What should i do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Start adult senior diet available in the market for him and give him pet joint capsules each one daily until symptoms subsidise
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a cat of 4 months old. I need to prevent it from pregnancy so is that possible through any injection or pill. Other then spay?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Hormone injection or pills could be given as contraception, but these come with sideffects. This can lead to some serious health issues to your kitten. Safest and reliable way is spaying.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a dog he is too moody about food. What should I do to balance his proper diet?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You should keep your dog on particular feed according to his age. Don't give treats in between esp. Our biscuits, just because he is not eating. Follow this routine for 15 days. Proper discipline is required to change behavior.
5 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Basha The Dog is having tumor at his back thie rarely bleeding ,please suggest a best medication it is from andhra pradesh

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
The tumor should be checked properly. Take the dog to near by vet to check whether it is just abscess or malignant tumor. Check the tumor. Is it hard, has any point like etc. Tumor should be seen in person before treatment.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My rabbit which is 4 months old is getting hiccups and is not frequent. Is that any serious issue to be taken care? What can we do when it gets hiccups? What causes hiccups for rabbits?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian, Secunderabad
If rabbit tries to drink water in a hurry it may get hiccups. Getting hiccups is not a major issue if occasional. Do not worry.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
What are the rules every dog owner should follow?

The number one way to communicate to a dog that you are his pack leader is to take him/her for a Pack walk daily, where the dog is made to heel beside or behind the human who is holding the lead. This is most important for all dogs, as in a dog?s mind, the leader always leads the way.
A dog must not be allowed to sniff or eliminate anywhere he wishes, but only where you allow him.
The dog should be concentrating on following the human.
All humans must eat before the dogs.
No table scraps should be fed to the dog during a meal.
Feedings must be at a scheduled time.
Humans must not let the dog go through any doorway first.
When you have left the house or the room, even for a minute and come back, ignore the dog for a few minutes.
A simple obedience command should be given before any pleasurable interaction with the dog. A child in the house should give the commands at least once a day and reward the dog with a treat when the command is followed.
You should not lie on the floor to watch TV when the dog is around, as a human should never put himself in an equal or lesser height position than the dog.
You are the first one who greets newcomers; the dog is the last that gets attention.
If a dog is lying in your path, do not walk around the dog, either make the dog move or step over the dog.
If you establish eye contact with the dog, the dog must avert his gaze first. Tell the children not to have staring contest with the dog.
Dogs must not sleep in your bed.
Games of fetch or play with toys must be started and ended by the human.
Dog should not be allowed to lie on your furniture.
No tug?of?war, as this is a game of power and you may lose the game giving the dog reinforcement (in the dog?s mind) of top dog.
Dogs need to be taught ?drop it? or ?release? command.
Dogs should not be allowed to pull on the leash.
When you put the food dish down, the dog must wait until you give the "OK" to eat it.
Small dogs or puppies who demand to be picked up or put down should not get what they want until they sit or do another acceptable quiet behavior.
Dogs should never be left unsupervised with children or anyone who cannot maintain leadership over the dog.
Last but certainly not least... avoid emotions, when you are around your dog. Your dog can sense these emotions and will see you as weak.
22 people found this helpful

My dog is not eating and her activeness has also decreased to a considerable level.What should I do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please let us know age breed sex and condition of the dog presently so that we could come for a calculation . else please take to a nearby vet
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed