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Dr. R Sampath Kumar

Veterinarian, Bangalore

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Dr. R Sampath Kumar Veterinarian, Bangalore
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I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
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Dr. R Sampath Kumar is a trusted Veterinarian in Basavanagudi, Bangalore. You can visit him at Lakeside Veterinary Clinic & Diagnostic Centre in Basavanagudi, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. R Sampath Kumar on Lybrate.com.

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Lakeside Veterinary Clinic & Diagnostic Centre

#21/83, Ramachandra Arcade, South End Road, Basavanagudi, Landmark: Below Balaji MedicalsBangalore Get Directions
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Your dog?s health is a key to a long and happy companionship. To keep it healthy in long run, it is important to know how your pet?s body work ? in health and disease! Being aware of certain basics helps you to prevent many problems, and pick up the major problems early in its course. In order to react quickly and help your pet?s ailments in timely manner you must be able to spot signs and relate them to specific systems, so as to understand gravity of it and seek Veterinarian?s advice sooner.
16 people found this helpful

My dog is 5 years old she is not eating from last 3 days whatever she eats she vomit back. What to do? Went to a Dr. he said that she's is suffering from gastrointestinal infection today he provided drip and don't know which medicine but my pet is not eating anything and she is very lethargic right now. I'm worried. Yesterday she had a fever of 104°C but today no fever was there.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
My dog is  5 years old she is not eating from last 3 days whatever she eats she vomit back. What to do? Went to a Dr....
please follow up the regular ceck up to the vet it may be from as simple as gastrointestinal infection to forieng body in stomach , please take a xray and scan to identityfy the things ......
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Hi I have black female pug 1 year old and she has this very tiny bald spots which are bumpy and a little pink in color .i don't think it itches so much since she doesn't scratch a lot.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
it could be superficial pyoderma. kindly use a medicated shampoo once in three days for four times and see if it helps. otherwise it is better to post some pics so that i can see what exactly r u talking about.
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My lebra have loose motion and he is only 1 month old. We only gives milk him to drink.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
You should not use milk for feeding. You should use ceralac (samolac) or starter feed. Check for deworming.
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My pup is 1 year old. let me know the vaccination schedule for him. He is a pug . Also let me know deworming schedule too.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Kolkata
What we are doing in kolkata -- fecal sample examination routinely to get an idea about the worms present within body/ intestine and selection of dewormers inaccordance with. For vaccination, it's best to have a prior health check up for fitness and high end immune status so that after innoculation antibody could be produced at desired level. Schedule we are following at par indian standard, a qualified vet will guide you as per your pet's requirement, individual dog differs with its schedule. Rabies, an endemic disease in india at different parts, needs no excuse to execute while planning for immunization against it. Consult further with your dog's previous records of immunizations and deworming. Thanks.
1 person found this helpful
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What are the healthy foods that can be given to 3 months old german shepherd to make him strong

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
IN MARKET WE HAVE A LOT DOG FOODS FROM PEDIGREE , ROYAL CANINE ,SCIENCE PLAN HILLS, GENESIUS, FARMINA , FIDELE,CHICOPEE ETC ITS ALWAYS DEPEND UPON U R CAPABILITY TO FEED USUALLY AND DOG TAKES AROUND 450-600GMS DAILY DOSAGE WHEN ITS IN ADUTS I MEAN LARGE BREEDS THIS FOODS COST FROM 180-450 PER KG IN RANGES ALL ARE GOOD FOR DOGS .OR ELSE YOU CAN FEED THEM HOME FOOD SPECIALLY MADE FOR DOGS WITH CARE ON NUTRITION REQUIREMENT AND BALANCED DIET SEEK YOUR VETS ADVICE IN IT THANKING YOU
4 people found this helpful
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Sir I have a dog by one compounder wrong injections it is in final stage it is not eating food and water from 8 days and not standing with legs.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Kolkata
if you can send photos, videos, photocopies of investigation results, at least we can try to penetrate and suggest you something on critical care, if you do not have potent qualified small animal health care facilities at your area. This is called tele-medicine too. One thing you need to do in absence of such facilities at your area, appoint one paravet who can inject, administer iv fluids and draw blood samples. Now send photos of your dog from different angles, try to capture videos with close take without missing its vital life activities like responsiveness to stimuli or its alertness, its movements that are present-- like its response to food and water etc. What more you can do, if you have veterinary pathological laboratory at your place or at your knowledge, just go for some blood tests. This may include cbc+diff, serum creatinine, urea, bun, serumna+, k+, ca++, lft, fasting blood glucose. Without wasting time, not to detain next treatment procedure to start you need to come out with all these promptly whether you are taking your pet to any hospital or consulting here with any qualified vet to initiate life saving attempts. But do not consult anyone who is not a licenced vet.
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Sir/mam, my dog (5 years old) is suffering with urine problem, i.e. He urinates but dropwise. He is otherwise active n takes meals properly There is no pain in stomach on pressing. Few days back he ate the whole small pack of pedigree and after that this happened. I gave him dexona n now giving norflox400. Pls help.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Rajkot
You give full of water as your dog want. It may be due to acidic urine so I advise routine urine test then consult the doctor.
1 person found this helpful
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Is spaying for dog helpful and safe? Please also mention its advantage and disadvantage.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Spaying is helpful for dog. It prevent dog from lot of problems like tumor, pyometra & hormonal imbalance. Only disadvantage is that dog put up weight after operation.
2 people found this helpful
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Sir my pet dog just ate a lizard and vomited all it ate, sir he is only 2 months old and I heard that it is very harmful for them, sir pls aay what can I do to help my pet?

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Sir my pet dog just ate a lizard and vomited all it ate, sir he is only 2 months old and I heard that it is very harm...
If your dog has vomited it is fine, no botheration, our domestic lizards are harmless,& cats eat them & even some human beings also do eat that I have noted it does not matter any thing to your dog, be tension free, of course there are poisonous lizards also, even after eating the contents should go to blood to see the symptoms, if your dog has lose motion, give antimalarial medicines, do not worry,
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Question specifically for a veterinarian but open to all. Post exposure rabies vaccination in injured pet cat, bitten by unknown animal (probably by stray dog), with visible bite mark injuries on back, resulting in paralysis of the the rear section of the cat (hind legs dragging) due to fracture of the spinal chord. My cat (female, 4 years) old was bitten on April 14th 2016 by an unknown animal (the vet in my place India suspected it to be a dog). She was pregnant at the time of injury. The cat was vaccinated (rabies vaccine CANVAC® R) given in last January and February 2015, I took the cat in a jute sack to the veterinarian and his assistant ,however, injected the vaccines both the times through the sack, however he said to me that he was sure that the vaccines were injected successfully. The cat however missed the scheduled anti rabies booster dose in Feb 2016. Actually the cat it belonged to my aunt residing near my house but somehow she came to our place, however at night she always stay outside like a free roaming cat. Two months back (possibly nite of April 14th 2016) the injury took place and we found her in our garage dragging her hind limbs, the doctor (veterinarian ) confirmed it to be bite injury causing damage in her spinal column, she initially could not urinate on her own, her bladder has to be evacuated with catheter every alternate day for a month. She underwent cesarean on May 5th and two kitten survived, kitten are healthy. After the injury she was given post exposure prophylaxis 5 doses of Nobivac® Rabies on 0,3,7,14 and 28th starting from April 15th to May 13th (however the 7th and 14th dose delayed by 1 and 5 days due to urine infection and fever. Is this post exposure vaccination effective? The vet in my place performed an xray on May 16th and plain xray revealed irreparable spinal chord fracture (probably the teeth of the biting stray dog went inside the spinal chord). Other than unable to urinate on her own sometimes and the rear leg paralysis, the cat looks fine, will the post exposure rabies vaccine work, is there any chance of her developing rabies in the future? In my place, there is no vet center where we can quarantine her for 6 months , so we have kept her home? It will be almost 3 months after the injury and she has not show any signs of rabies, she is eating fine and behaving normally , other than unable to walk due to hind leg paralysis cause of the spinal chord injury. Somewhere I read in the internet that "--post exposure prophylaxis should not be given on injured cats cause it mask symptoms of infection (like rabies) in cats. The documented rabies quarantine time is 6 months. There is a chance that any pet bitten by an unknown animal can develop rabies as we cannot affirm that the attacker did not have rabies--" But the veterinarian in my place gave the post exposure rabies injection, is this correct? Is there any chance of developing rabies in my cat in the future? Me and my family are taking care of the cat in the best possible way.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Rabies can cause only and only by an infected mammal only to any mammal walking the earth. Infected mammals like a dog, may show typical signs of rabies (mad dog with ropy saliva from the jaws and red eyes), so easily identified a d isolated by fellow pack mates and humans. Rabies vaccination protects (doesn't mask the signs) a mammal like a cat or a dog or a human, from being infected by rabies when bitten by a rabid animal. Symptoms of rabies can be seen within a week to 10 days from the day of bite. Extra dosages of a rabies vaccine would not coz any harm as such except mild fever or local pain at the site of injection for a day or two. Your family is safe in handling the cat as it is not showing any such sign of the rabies infection so far. Rabies is transmitted only when your blood will come in contact with the saliva of an infected animal.
1 person found this helpful
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What should be the right food for budgerigar birds (Australian parakeets) small size. I tried feeding them carrots, capsicum and coriander leaves along with seeds but petshop owner said it cause diarrhea to them. One of my bird tucks her head whole day. What should I do?

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
You are right give chillis, coriander, carrots, beans along with seeds also, no problem, it does not cause diarrhea, it may be other reason. Twisting neck & head may be due to some b complex deficiency, so give b, complex syrup in the drinking water for a week, it will help. Even you can give vimral mixed with food, try. That is all.
1 person found this helpful
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Is there any antiviral medicine for canine distemper? Please tell me. If it works 50% also then tell me.

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Sorry, till date there is no effective antiviral against distemper only alternatives is timely to prevent disease.
1 person found this helpful
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My dog aged 4 years suffers from bad breath. I have tried brushing his teeth, which he does not like and is such a waste of time and energy. What should I do?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
I' m sure he must be enjoying taste of toothpaste too! please speak to your vet a schedule a dental cleaning/scaling appointment. Rule out other causes of bad breath such as - improper bowel movements, excess worm load etc.
1 person found this helpful
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

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4 people found this helpful

My dog is vomiting water like liquid little foamy with tiny bits of blood, it happened twice, one 5 days back in the morning around 4am, then at 2am. During vomiting he collapsed and paralyzed without any movement. Both time he woke up after 5 mins and he was active. I gave him rantac and vomited (half). Please help me, I am scared, he is 12 years old. 6 months back he had UTI. He is being given Nefrotec DS 1 tabs a day from 4 months as Advised by Vet. Please Please Help me, save my boy.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Due to her kidney problems, seems her heart is suffering a bit. Toxins r slowly raising to the brain. You have to get your dog to your nearby vet Dr. For daily blood tests and iv fluid therapies with proper antibiotics if any sign of infection is confirmed by the blood reports.
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My 6 months old golden retriever swallowed laptop plug in.And it is visible in the X-ray reports.In the stomach .Please advise.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Just wait until it passes out in motion. Usually take few days . Give lactulose syrup daily 10 ml for 3 times . And also x ray mandatory every 12 hrs to see the movement of the plug . Dont worry it will come if stayed inside have to go for surgery and remove it
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