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Dr. Pawan Kumar

Veterinarian, Bangalore

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Dr. Pawan Kumar Veterinarian, Bangalore
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Personal Statement

I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. Pawan Kumar
Dr. Pawan Kumar is a renowned Veterinarian in Babusa Palya, Bangalore. He is currently associated with Cessna Lifeline in Babusa Palya, Bangalore. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Pawan Kumar on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Veterinarians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Veterinarians with more than 40 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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English

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Cessna Lifeline

#148, HBCS, Amar Jyothi Layout, KGA Road, Off Intermediate Ring RoadBangalore Get Directions
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I think my dog have an ear infection. What should i do? and he does not let me touch his ear.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
Ear infection is painful so u hv to show to vet so he will put muzzle or under sedation he will clean ear and tell proper medicine
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I have a pet of breed german shepherd he is not able to excrete properly his diet is good wht shd i do?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Might be digestion complication . Please take it to a vet and also concentrate fibre content in the dog as it will also lead to such compliances
1 person found this helpful
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My cat has suffering from fever and sneezing continuously, eating sometimes only, what do I do for my pet cat?

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Fever and sneezing are signs of systematic infection kindly take it to nearby vet. Your vet will check fever plus will check the nasal track along with lungs to access condition of respiratory tract.
1 person found this helpful
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What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

B.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Varanasi
What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

Bleeding pets often suffer blood loss as a result of trauma. If bleeding is severe or continuous, the animal may lose enough blood to cause shock (loss of as little as 2 teaspoons per pound of body weight may cause shock). Emergencies may arise that require the owner to control the bleeding, even if it is just during transport of the animal to the veterinary facility. Pet owners should know how to stop hemorrhage (bleeding) if their pet is injured.

 Techniques to stop external bleeding:-

 The following techniques are listed in order of preference. 

1) Direct pressure:--gently press a compress (a pad of clean cloth or gauze) over the bleeding absorbing the blood and allowing it to clot. Do not disturb blood clots after they have formed. If blood soaks through, do not remove the pad; simply add additional layers of cloth and continue the direct pressure more evenly. The compress can be bound in place using bandage material which frees the hands of the first provider for other emergency actions. In the absence of a compress, a bare hand or finger can be used. Direct pressure on a wound is the most preferable way to stop bleeding.

2) Elevation:--if there is a severely bleeding wound on the foot or leg, gently elevate the leg so that the wound is above the level of the heart. Elevation uses the force of gravity to help reduce blood pressure in the injured area, slowing the bleeding. Elevation is most effective in larger animals with longer limbs where greater distances from wound to heart are possible. Direct pressure with compresses should also be maintained to maximize the use of elevation. Elevation of a limb combined with direct pressure is an effective way to stop bleeding. 

3) Pressure on the supplying artery:-- if external bleeding continues following the use of direct pressure and elevation, finger or thumb pressure over the main artery to the wound is needed. Apply pressure to the femoral artery in the groin for severe bleeding of a rear leg; to the brachial artery in the inside part of the upper front leg for bleeding of a front leg; or to the caudal artery at the base of the tail if the wound is on the tail. Continue application of direct pressure.

4) Pressure above and below the bleeding wound:-- this can also be used in conjunction with direct pressure. Pressure above the wound will help control arterial bleeding. Pressure below the wound will help control bleeding from veins.

5) Tourniquet:--use of a tourniquet is dangerous and it should be used only for a severe, life-threatening hemorrhage in a limb (leg or tail) not expected to be saved. A wide (2-inch or more) piece of cloth should be used to wrap around the limb twice and tied into a knot. A short stick or similar object is then tied into the knot as well. Twist the stick to tighten the tourniquet until the bleeding stops. Secure the stick in place with another piece of cloth and make a written note of the time it was applied. Loosen the tourniquet for 15 to 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Remember this is dangerous and will likely result in disability or amputation. Use of a tourniquet should only be employed as a last-resort, life-saving measure!

6) Internal bleeding:--internal bleeding is a life-threatening condition, but it is not obvious like external bleeding. Any bleeding which is visible is external. 
Internal bleeding occurs inside the body and will not be seen. There are, however, external signs of internal bleeding: 
• the pet is pale (check the gums or eyelids).
• the pet is cool on the legs, ears, or tail. 
• the pet is extremely excited or unusually subdued. If any of these signs are evident, the pet should be immediately transported to a veterinary facility for professional help. Remember: internal bleeding is not visible on the outside.

Sir we have a pug breed god she have a skin disease some of doctors are treated but she is not cure she is suffering with this disease from last 1year.Please do help

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Demodicosis is severe infection of skin. As your pet is already getting treatment then let me know what line of treatment you have done so far. Its cure depends on age, immunity and right choice of drug.
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My rabbit suffer in fever from yesterday.What is the treatment of rabbit fever? plz reply

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Use paracetamol 125 mg oral baby suspension 2-3 ml thrice daily with vitamin tonic as a supportive therapy
1 person found this helpful
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I have a saint bernad pup of 5 months in himachal pradesh. He have a indigestion problem. He is not digesting anything from past one and half month. I don't have good vets here. please suggest me some medicine.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
If you can get biopron suspension human medicine can be given at the dosage rate of 10 ml -0-10 ml twice daily and let me know the outcome so that we can move further.
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I have a dog. Who is 2 month old. So I want to know about her food & diet? As she vomits vry frequently aftr eating anything.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Just give soft gruel kind of food n check. Like cerelac etc. If vilomiting immediately without squeezing the stomach, that means your puppy has megaesophagus. Which is not good.
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I have an abandoned pigeon's new born baby. What do I feed him? How much to feed? And at what time intervals? And will it excrete by itself? Please help. Where can I get him rehabilitated?

BVSc
Veterinarian, Ghaziabad
You can feed half moisted crushed grains, four times a day. Better you can shift him to bird shelter kavi nagar Jain mandir Thanks.
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