Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Narayana Bhat

Veterinarian, Bangalore

Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Narayana Bhat Veterinarian, Bangalore
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
More about Dr. Narayana Bhat
Dr. Narayana Bhat is an experienced Veterinarian in RMV Extension, Bangalore. You can meet Dr. Narayana Bhat personally at Rashmi Veterinary Clinic in RMV Extension, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Narayana Bhat on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Veterinarians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Veterinarians with more than 35 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Languages spoken
English

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Narayana Bhat

Rashmi Veterinary Clinic

No.55, 3rd Main Road, 2nd Stage, AECS Layout, RMV ExtensionBangalore Get Directions
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Narayana Bhat

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

My dog is alsation dog.He is 7 years old n he is very active dog.He is suffering from back leg weaknes.Suggest me good medicine for that.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
GSD has arthiritis problem after certain age and ur dog seem to have same. You should start giving his joint supplement like glycoflex
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Sir I am having a pug puppy of 65 days old and taken his 1st vaccination on 22nd june, 2015. Yesterday she lightly bite by daughter of 6 years old on her nose. Is it necessary to take her vaccine? pls. Advise.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
No need. they dont have any rabies infection so can wash it with running water and have dettol on the wound.
5 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

How to House Train Your Puppy

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

House training is accomplished by rewarding your puppy for eliminating where you want him to go (outside) AND by preventing him from urinating or defecating in unacceptable places (inside the house). You should keep crating and confinement to a minimum, but some amount of restriction is usually necessary for your puppy to learn to “hold it.” (To learn how to crate train your puppy, please see our article, Weekend Crate Training.)

How Long It Will Take

Some puppies learn where and where not to eliminate at a very young age, while others take longer to understand. Most puppies can be reasonably housetrained by four to six months of age. However, some puppies are not 100% reliable until they are eight to twelve months of age. Some puppies seem to catch on early but then regress. This is normal. Keep in mind that it may take a while for your puppy to develop bowel and bladder control. He may be mentally capable of learning to eliminate outdoors instead of inside, but he may not yet be physically capable of controlling his body.

How Often Your Puppy Needs to Go Out

All puppies are different, but a puppy can usually only hold his waste for the same number of hours as his age in months. (In other words, a four-month-old pup should not be left alone for more than four consecutive hours without an opportunity to go outside.) He can last longer at night, however, since he’s inactive (just like we can). By the time your pup is about four months old, he should be able to make it through the night without going outside.

House Training Steps

1. Keep your puppy on a consistent daily feeding schedule and remove food between meals.

2. Take the puppy outside on a consistent schedule. Puppies should be taken out every hour, as well as shortly after meals, play and naps. All puppies should go out first thing in the morning, last thing at night and before being confined or left alone.

3. In between these outings, know where your puppy is at all times. You need to watch for early signs that he needs to eliminate so that you can anticipate and prevent accidents from happening. These signs include pacing, whining, circling, sniffing or leaving the room. If you see any of these, take your puppy outside as quickly as possible. Not all puppies learn to let their caretakers know that they need to go outside by barking or scratching at the door. Some will pace a bit and then just eliminate inside. So watch your puppy carefully.

4. If you can’t watch your puppy, he must be confined to a crate or a small room with the door closed or blocked with a baby gate. Alternatively, you can tether him to you by a leash that does not give him much leeway around you (about a six-foot leash). Gradually, over days or weeks, give your puppy more freedom, starting with freedom a small area, like the kitchen, and gradually increasing it to larger areas, or multiple rooms, in your home. If he eliminates outside, give him some free time in the house (about 15 to 20 minutes to start), and then put him back in his crate or small room. If all goes well, gradually increase the amount of time he can spend out of confinement.

5. Accompany your puppy outside and reward him whenever he eliminates outdoors with praise, treats, play or a walk. It’s best to take your puppy to the same place each time because the smells often prompt puppies to eliminate. Some puppies will eliminate early on in a walk. Others need to move about and play for a bit first.

6. If you catch your puppy in the act of eliminating inside, clap sharply twice, just enough to startle but not scare him. (If your puppy seems upset or scared by your clapping, clap a little softer the next time you catch him in the act.) When startled, the puppy should stop in mid-stream. Immediately run with him outside, encouraging him to come with you the whole way. (If necessary, take your puppy gently by the collar to run him outside.) Allow your pup to finish eliminating outside, and then reward him with happy praise and a small treat. If he has nothing to eliminate when he gets outside, don’t worry. Just try to be more watchful of him in the house in the future. If your puppy has an accident but you don’t catch him in the act and only find the accident afterward, do nothing to your pup. He cannot connect any punishment with something he did hours or even minutes ago.

Additional House Training Tips

Clean accidents with an enzymatic cleanser to minimize odors that might attract the puppy back to the same spot.
Once your puppy is house trained in your home, he may still have accidents when visiting others’ homes. That’s because puppies need to generalize their learning to new environments. Just because they seem to know something in one place does NOT mean that they’ll automatically know that thing everywhere. You’ll need to watch your puppy carefully when you visit new places together and be sure to take him out often.
Likewise, if something in your puppy’s environment changes, he may have a lapse in house training. For example, a puppy might seem completely house trained until you bring home a large potted tree—which may look to him like a perfect place to lift his leg!
House training does require an investment of time and effort—but it can be done! If you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Hang in there! If you need help, don’t hesitate to contact a qualified professional, such as a Certified Professional Dog Trainer (CPDT), a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist (CAAB or Associate CAAB) or a board-certified veterinary behaviorist (Dip ACVB). To find one of these experts in your area, please see our article, Finding Professional Help.

What NOT to Do

Do not rub your puppy’s nose in his waste.
Do not scold your dog for eliminating indoors. Instead, if you catch him in the act, make a noise to startle him and stop him from urinating or defecating. Then immediately show your dog where you want him to go by running with him outside, waiting until he goes, and then praising and rewarding him.
Do not physically punish your puppy for accidents (hitting with newspaper, spanking, etc.). Realize that if your puppy has accidents in the house, you failed to adequately supervise him, you did not take him outside frequently enough, or you ignored or were unaware of his signals that he needed to go outside.
Do not confine your puppy to a small area for hours each day, without doing anything else to correct the problem.
Do not crate your puppy if he’s soiling in the crate.
If your puppy enjoys being outside, don’t bring him inside right after he eliminates or he may learn to “hold it” so that he can stay outside longer.
Do not clean with an ammonia-based cleanser. Urine contains ammonia. Cleaning with ammonia could attract your puppy back to the same spot to urinate again. Instead, use an enzymatic cleaner. You can find one at some grocery stores or any major pet store.
20 people found this helpful

Sir, We have a rescued Pointerdor female dog. She is a lovely dog but very very nervous the moment she steps out of the house. Please help.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Nothing to worry, if her feeding habits and other things are normal, play lot like a kid for few weeks.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Preventive Health care: As pets age faster than humans, a year is a long time in a dog's life. We all know that preventing disease or catching it in its early stages is far better than treating it once it has had time to progress to a more severe stage. Preventive health care on a regular basis will help you do just that, and save you and your pet from needless suffering and a larger financial burden.
It is recommended that every pet should receive a general health evaluation once in 6 months. A preventive health visit should cover following aspects:
• Vaccination status
• Parasite control for intestinal parasites, ear mites, ticks and fleas.
• Dental health – care you give at home; any mouth odours, pain, or other signs of disease you may have observed
• Nutrition – including what your dog eats, how often, what supplements and treats are given, and changes in water consumption, weight, or appetite
• Exercise - how much exercise your dog receives including how often and what kind; and any changes in your dog's ability to exercise
• Ears and Eyes – any discharge, redness, or itching
• Stomach and intestines – any vomiting, diarrhoea, constipation, gas, belching, or abnormal stools
• Breathing – any coughing, shortness of breath, sneezing, or nasal discharge
• Behaviour – any behaviour problems such as barking, changes in temperament, any obsessive behaviour, urinary accidents
• Feet and legs – any limping, weakness, toenail problems
• Coat and skin – any hair loss, pigment changes, lumps, itchy spots, shedding, mats, or anal sac problems
• Urogenital – any discharges, heats, changes in mammary glands, urination difficulties or changes, Neutering - if it has not already been performed
• Blood tests – especially for geriatric dogs, those with medical problems, and those who are receiving medications
6 people found this helpful

My dog actually got a tumor just below it's rib. My dog is not feeling any pain when I touch the tumour I am afraid please help what medication should be taken.

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Kolkata
Surgery could be required. But before surgery there are many things (investigations, medications etc.) needed to covered up. Consult accordingly.
2 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My dog got bitten by another street dog, the other street dog inserted his teeth inside my dog. We have given him injection of rabbies and poison. Pls help me with medicines which can help me to get this wound faster.

BHMS
Homeopath, Delhi
You may give him homoeopathic medicines. Apply calendula Q, f we drops in water and also give lac caninum 200 and hypericum 200 10 drops mix with water orally.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a female dog. She is 12 years old .now color of her teeth is changing. Tartar built on her teeth .I just wanted to know how to take care of her teeth?

M.D. Consultant Pathologist, CCEBDM Diabetes, PGDS Sexology USA, CCMTD Thyroid, ACDMC Heart Disease, CCMH Hypertension, ECG
Sexologist, Sri Ganganagar
It can leadto gum cavities and disease. Better consult some vetenary doctor so that you dog may not get teeth damage. Certain pyrophosphates help to decrease new crystals of tartar from forming.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi my dog is 10 years old and he his having a red paws infection in his paws can we give the medicine namely evoxil 500.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
Evoxil 500 MG Capsule is an antibiotic that is used for treating a wide variety of bacterial infections of the lungs and airways, middle ear, sinuses, skin, urinary tract, etc. You can give it if there is infection
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My cat gave birth 4 times in last year, so I want to know that is there any non surgical procedure for controlling the birth cycle.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Jammu
Non surgical method include administration of progestrone but that will cause hypertrophy of endometrium so if you planning go fr surgical method only.
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed