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Dr. Najmus Sehar

M.Phil - Psychology

Psychologist, Bangalore

17 Years Experience
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Dr. Najmus Sehar M.Phil - Psychology Psychologist, Bangalore
17 Years Experience
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Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
More about Dr. Najmus Sehar
Najmus Sehar is a renowned Psychologist in Whitefield, Bangalore. He has been a practicing ist for 16 years. He has done M.phil. You can consult Najmus Sehar at Najmus Sehar in Whitefield, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Najmus Sehar and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Psychologist in India. You will find Psychologist with more than 38 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
M.Phil - Psychology - Central Institute of Psychiatry - 2001
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

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ShriRam Samruddhi Near Kundanahalli Gate Whitefield Main Road Bangalore - 560066Bangalore Get Directions
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I am not happy about my family. My father used to get drunk and even create a lot of problems. What am I suppose to do.

NCCH & MCH
Homeopath, Kolkata
Dear user. You need to take your father for counselling that will be helpful and also is you can feed him a remedy Quercus Q 10 drops for few days in halp cup of water to break the habit of drinking along with Nux 200 once daily will be helpful.
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I am 25 years old married woman and also pursuing my masters, I lost my mother in cancer, 3 years back and since then I feel lonely and helpless even if I have all other friends and family to support me. I lost my confidence too. Is it a sign of depression? What can be done about it?

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
I am 25 years old married woman and also pursuing my masters, I lost my mother in cancer, 3 years back and since then...
I think you need to look at handling your grief and dealing with your mother's loss once and for all. This could put you into a sadness related depression but you will be able to come out of it if you express your grief in totality and effectively. The sooner you do it the better for your studies. You must be active and work towards your reformation. Many lifestyle changes need to be made to progress away for the condition. When you are depressed, you will feel lazy though I would like to call it lethargy. There is an inertia and lack of energy to even think, let alone act. You are required to literally do the opposite of what you feel like doing. Depression makes you want to withdraw, lie down, sleep, become lethargic, slow down, make you too lazy to even think etc. So when I suggested doing the opposite, you will need to fight this condition. You must become active; stay upright during the daylight time; meet people; never sleep during the day, wake up by 6 am every day, play some active games, especially contact games, do physical exercises, talk to people and join some social clubs, eat more of proteins, nuts, fruits, and vegetables, attend Yoga classes etc. Watch sitcoms on TV or comedies and cheer yourself up. Go for excursions in groups, for outings, camps, conferences, and religious conventions. Get a pet dog and spend time training it, exercising it and relating to it. Expose yourself to some sunlight every day, at least 30 minutes but not in the scotching heat. Whatever happens, please incorporate these three important adaptations in your life: always be responsible, be respectful, and be functional. If you did these three things, lots of things will go well in life. Please pray and have faith in God to alleviate your sufferings. Don’t wait for others to help. Use your own motivation, which might be at its lowest, but persevere and win this battle. The counselor is there only to facilitate you, all the hard word must come from you, and your cooperation with that person is very critical for your success.
1 person found this helpful
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How To Deal With Obsessive Compulsive Behaviour?

D.N.B. Psychiatry, Diploma In Psychological Medicine (Psychiatry), MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery
Psychiatrist, Navi Mumbai
How To Deal With Obsessive Compulsive Behaviour?

Obsessive compulsive behaviour is form of anxiety disorder in which unreasonable thoughts and fears, which are obsessions that lead one to do repetitive compulsive behaviour. Root causes of obsessive compulsiveness are complex and often deep seated. The underlying emotional states may include the fear of unknown, not being in control, negative outcomes, failure, rejection, shame, annihilation or embarrassment

You can eliminate mild obsessive compulsion easily, whereas, severe obsessive compulsiveness, require support of medical and mental health professionals.

When you start pondering or obsessing over an activity, you must try to stop the negative pattern, and provide control and security. A good anchor code stops an obsessive thought pattern and provides fact-based security for new action. One can get it under control and recover from it

The treatment for obsessive compulsive behaviour depends on the how much the condition is affecting the daily life of the person. There are two main treatments-

  1. Firstly cognitive behavioural therapy, which involves graded exposure and response prevention. The cognitive behaviour therapy emboldens one to face one's fear and let the obsessive thoughts occur without neutralising them with compulsions.
  2. The second being the medication. In this case, treatment is by medication to control one's symptoms by altering the balance of chemicals in brain.

Obsessive compulsive behaviour that has a relatively minor impact on one's daily life is usually treated with a short course of cognitive behavioural therapy. Cognitive behavioural therapy involves exposure and response prevention that is used to help people with all severities. People with mild to moderate behaviour usually need about 10 hours of therapist treatment, combined with exercises to be done at home between sessions. Those with moderate to severe symptoms may need a more intensive course of therapy that lasts longer than 10 hours.

During the sessions, one works with therapist to break down the problems into their separate parts like physical feelings, thoughts and actions. The therapist encourages you to face your fear and let the obsessive thoughts occur without putting them right. It requires motivation and one should start with situations that cause the least anxiety first. These exposure exercises need to take place many times a day, and need to be done for one to two hours without engaging in compulsions to undo them. People with Obsessive compulsive behaviour find that when they confront their anxiety without carrying the compulsion, the anxiety goes away. Each time, the chances of anxiety reduces and last for a shorter period of time. 

Once you have one exposure task, you can move on to a more difficult task, until you have overcome all of the situations that make you anxious.  It is important to remember it can take several months before a treatment has a noticeable effect. It is extremely vital to remember that no one is perfect, nor can anyone recover perfectly.  Even in well maintained recoveries, people can occasionally mess up and forget what they are supposed to be doing. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4653 people found this helpful

How to overcome depression and how to put on some weight in that way eating not only food.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist, Bangalore
How to overcome depression and how to put on some weight in that way eating not only food.
You need to meet with a counselor immediately and if that person feels you need to meet with a doctor too, you must do so. You must cooperate with both therapies and be consistent. I suggest that you visit these professionals along with your parents because their involvement is quite critical to your recovery. If it is of recent origin, you could easily pin-point it and take care of it. But I suspect that it may have to do with something in your developmental years, or your family background. In the meantime do the following, sincerely: Have a good night’s sleep, have a good breakfast of more proteins, meditate often, remain free of stress, eat a lot of fiber, nuts, avocado, exercise regularly, eat dark chocolate, do Yoga meditation exercises, etc. I suggest you do the opposite of what this depression makes you feel like doing (actually, not doing): you will need to fight this condition. You must become active; stay upright during the daylight time; meet people; never sleep during the day, wake up by 6 am every day, play some active games, especially contact games, do physical exercises, talk to people and join some social clubs, attend Yoga classes etc. Watch sitcoms on TV or comedies and cheer yourself up. Go for excursions in groups, for outings, camps, conferences, and religious conventions. Get a pet dog and spend time training it, exercising it and relating to it. Expose yourself to some sunlight every day, at least 30 minutes but not in the scotching heat. Whatever happens, please incorporate these three important adaptations in your life: always be responsible, be respectful, and be functional. If you did these three, lots of things will go well in life. Please pray and have faith in God to alleviate your sufferings. Don’t wait for others to help. Use your own motivation, which might be at its lowest, but persevere and win this battle. Above all to be really happy, you need to live in love and for love: find someone to love and to love you back. If you love yourself adequately, you will never do harm to yourself. Be positive always and learn to do everything possible to invest into yourself. Life is extremely precious and because the depression, which is a mood disorder, makes you feel like giving up you must still persevere. Learn all about emotions and how to handle them and that will get you out of the depression rather easily and quickly. A counselor is there only to facilitate you, all the hard word must come from you, and your cooperation with that person is very critical for your success. Be positive everyday and learn to be contended with what you have. Do some left brain exercises: it is the happy brain. Here are a few suggestions: shut your left nostril and breathe, move your eyes from right to left and vice versa for at least half a minute at a time, and do callisthenic exercises with some form of counting, regularly. Whatever happens please cooperate with the therapy and do not discontinue until the condition is completely resolved. Because you are young the prognosis is good subject to your cooperation. You want to put on weight you must exercise regularly and eat well. Sometimes you may suddenly feel that you are over-weight and will want to reduce and may have a problem with that. So do give this a serious thought and then do whatever is necessary. Any way exercise is a must for healthy living.
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My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, delusions, hallucinations, and negative symptoms like reduced motivation, speech and activity are occurred. Now he is on medications for that. He is on tab quiet 25 mg (Quetiapine Fumarate INN 28.728 mg equivalent to 25 mg of Quetiapine) once daily. 1 hour after taking this medicine he gets calm and sleeps. Even if he wakes up in the middle of the night, he was not in his senses at that time. Most of the time he urinates while he is asleep. Even he forgets to go to washroom and he poops in his pants but he forgets to wash himself. His condition is not improving. Kindly please suggest suitable medication which can cure above said things of his health.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Davanagere
My dad is 63 years old. From last 6 months he's been forgetting some specific part of his life and lack of sleep, del...
Hi there ~ Dementia and Alzheimer’s Care Planning and Preparing for the Road Ahead Improving Emotional Health Alzheimer's disease and other types of dementia can be a challenging journey, not only for the person diagnosed but also for their family members and loved ones. Caring for someone with Alzheimer's or dementia can seem overwhelming at times, but the more information and support you have, the better you can navigate the demanding road ahead and determine the long-term care options that are best suited to you and your loved one. Preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care As you come to grips with an Alzheimer’s or other dementia diagnosis, you may be dealing with a whole range of emotions and concerns. You’ll no doubt be worried about how your loved one will change, how you’ll keep him or her comfortable, and how much your life will change. You’ll also likely be experiencing emotions such as anger, grief, and shock. Adjusting to this new reality is not easy. It’s important to give yourself some time and to reach out for help. The more support you have, the better you will be able to help your loved one. While some of these tips are directed specifically at Alzheimer’s patients, they may equally apply to those with other types of dementia as well, including vascular and mixed dementia. Early-stage Alzheimer’s care preparations There are some Alzheimer’s care preparations that are best done sooner rather than later. It may be hard to consider these questions at first, as it means thinking about a time when your loved one is already well down the road of his or her Alzheimer’s journey. However, putting preparations in place early helps a smoother transition for everyone. Depending on the stage of diagnosis, include the person with Alzheimer’s in the decision-making process as much as possible. If their dementia is at a more advanced stage, at least try to act on what their wishes would be. Questions to consider in preparing for Alzheimer’s and dementia care: Who will make healthcare and/or financial decisions when the person is no longer able to do so? While a difficult topic to bring up, if your loved one is still lucid enough, getting their wishes down on paper means they’ll be preserved and respected by all members of the family. Consider meeting with an elder law attorney to best understand your options. You’ll want to consider power of attorney, both for finances and for healthcare. If the person has already lost capacity, you may need to apply for guardianship/conservatorship. More information can be found in the Resources section below. How will care needs be met? Sometimes family members assume that a spouse or nearest family member can take on caregiving, but that is not always the case. Caregiving is a large commitment that gets bigger over time. The person with Alzheimer’s will eventually need round-the-clock care. Family members may have their own health issues, jobs, and responsibilities. Communication is essential to make sure that the needs of the Alzheimer’s patient are met, and that the caregiver has the support to meet those needs. Where will the person live? Is his or her own home appropriate, or is it difficult to access or make safe for later? If the person is currently living alone, for example, or far from any family or other support, it may be necessary to relocate or consider a facility with more support. Find out what assistance your medical team can provide in these areas. In some countries, you can also hire a care manager privately. Geriatric care managers can provide an initial assessment as well as assistance with managing your case, including crisis management, interviewing in-home help, or assisting with placement in an assisted living facility or nursing home. Developing day-to-day routines Having a general daily routine in Alzheimer’s and dementia care helps caregiving run smoothly. These routines won’t be set in stone, but they give a sense of consistency, which is beneficial to the Alzheimer’s patient even if they can’t communicate it. While every family will have their own unique routine, you can get some great ideas from your medical team or Alzheimer’s support group, especially regarding establishing routines to handle the most challenging times of day, such as evenings. Keep a sense of structure and familiarity. Try to keep consistent daily times for activities such as waking up, mealtimes, bathing, dressing, receiving visitors, and bedtime. Keeping these things at the same time and place can help orientate the person. Let the person know what to expect even if you are not sure that he or she completely understands. You can use cues to establish the different times of day. For example, in the morning you can open the curtains to let sunlight in. In the evening, you can put on quiet music to indicate it’s bedtime. Involve the person in daily activities as much as they are able. For example, a person may not be able to tie their shoes, but may be able to put clothes in the hamper. Clipping plants outside may not be safe, but the person may be able to weed, plant, or water. Use your best judgment as to what is safe and what the person can handle. Communication tips As your loved one’s Alzheimer’s progresses, you will notice changes in communication. Trouble finding words, increased hand gestures, easy confusion, even inappropriate outbursts are all normal. Here are some do’s and don’ts on communicating: Communication Do's and Don'ts? Do Avoid becoming frustrated by empathizing and remembering the person can’t help their condition. Making the person feel safe rather than stressed will make communication easier. Take a short break if you feel your fuse getting short. Keep communication short, simple, and clear. Give one direction or ask one question at a time. Tell the person who you are if there appears to be any doubt. Call the person by name. Speak slowly. The person may take longer to process what’s being said. Use closed-ended questions which can be answered “yes” or “no.” For example, ask, “Did you enjoy the beef at dinner?” instead of “What did you have for dinner?” Find a different way to say the same thing if it wasn’t understood. Try a simpler statement with fewer words. Use distraction or fibs if telling the whole truth will upset the person with dementia. For example, to answer the question, “Where is my mother?” it may be better to say, “She’s not here right now” instead of “She died 20 years ago.” Use repetition as much as necessary. Be prepared to say the same things over and over as the person can’t recall them for more than a few minutes at a time. Use techniques to attract and maintain the person’s attention. Smile, make eye contact, use gestures, touch, and other body language. Don't Ever say things like: “Do you remember?” “Try to remember!” “Did you forget?” “How could you not know that? Ask questions that challenge short-term memory such as “Do you remember what we did last night?” The answer will likely be “no,” which may be humiliating for the person with dementia. Talk in paragraphs. Instead, offer one idea at a time. Point out the person’s memory difficulty. Avoid remarks such as “I just told you that.” Instead, just repeat it over and over. Talk in front of the person as if he or she were not present. Always include the person in any conversation when they are physically present. Use lots of pronouns such as "there, that, those, him, her, it. Use nouns instead. For example, instead of "sit there" say "sit in the blue chair. Use slang or unfamiliar words. The person may not understand the latest terms or phrases. Use patronizing language or “baby talk.” A person with dementia will feel angry or hurt at being talked down to. Use sarcasm or irony, even if meant humorously. Again, it can cause hurt or confusion. Planning activities and visitors As you develop daily routines, it’s important to include activities and visitors. You want to make sure that the Alzheimer’s patient is getting sensory experiences and socialization, but not to the point of getting overstimulated and stressed. Here are some suggestions for activities: Start with the person’s interests. Ask family and friends for memories of interests the person used to have. You’ll want to tailor the interests to the current level of ability so the person doesn’t get frustrated. Vary activities to stimulate different senses of sight, smell, hearing, and touch. For example, you can try singing songs, telling stories, movement such as dance, walking, or swimming, tactile activities such as painting, working with clay, gardening, or interacting with pets. Planning time outdoors can be very therapeutic. You can go for a drive, visit a park, or take a short walk. Even sitting on a balcony or in the backyard can be relaxing. Consider outside group activities designed for those with Alzheimer’s. Senior centers or community centers may host these types of activities. You can also look into adult day care programs, which are partial or full days at a facility catering to older adults and/or dementia patients. Visitors and social events Visitors can be a rich part of the day for a person with Alzheimer’s disease. It can also provide an opportunity for you as the caregiver to socialize or take a break. Plan visitors at a time of day when your loved one can best handle them. Brief visitors on communication tips if they are uncertain and suggest they bring memorabilia your loved one may like, such as a favorite old song or book. Family and social events may also be appropriate, as long as the Alzheimer’s patient is comfortable. Focus on events that won’t overwhelm the person; excessive activity or stimulation at the wrong time of day might be too much to handle. Handling challenges in Alzheimer's and dementia care One of the most painful parts of Alzheimer’s disease is watching a loved one display behavior you never would have thought possible. Alzheimer’s can cause substantial changes in how someone acts. This can range from the embarrassing, such as inappropriate outbursts, to wandering, hallucinations, and violent behavior. Everyday tasks like eating, bathing, and dressing can become major challenges. Painful as some behaviors are, it’s critical not to blame yourself or try to handle all the changes in behavior alone. As challenging behavior progresses, you may find yourself too embarrassed to go out, for example, or to seek respite care. Unfortunately, difficult behavior is part and parcel of Alzheimer’s disease. Don’t isolate yourself. Ask for help from the medical team and reach out to caregiver groups for support. There are ways to modify or better accommodate problem behaviors. Both the environment you create at home and the way you communicate with your loved one can make a substantial difference. Considering long-term Alzheimer's and dementia care It’s the nature of Alzheimer’s disease to progressively get worse as memory deteriorates. In the advanced stages of Alzheimer’s, your loved one will likely need round-the-clock care. Thinking ahead to these possibilities can help make decisions easier. To find links to organizations in your area that may be able to help, see Resources and References below. Care at home There are several options for extending care at home: In-home help refers to caregivers that you can hire to provide assistance for your loved one. In-home help ranges from a few hours a week of assistance to live-in help, depending on your needs. You’ll want to evaluate what sort of tasks you’d like help with, how much you can afford to spend, and what hours you need. Getting help with basic tasks like housekeeping, shopping, or other errands can also help you provide more focused care for your loved one. Day programs, also called adult day care, are programs that typically operate weekdays and offer a variety of activities and socialization opportunities. They also provide the chance for you as the caregiver to continue working or attend to other needs. There are some programs that specialize in dementia care. Respite care. Respite care is short-term care where your loved one stays in a facility temporarily. This gives you a block of time to rest, travel, or attend to other things. Is it time to move? As Alzheimer’s progresses, the physical and mental demands on you as caregiver can gradually become overwhelming. Each day can bring more challenges. The patient may require total assistance with physical tasks like bathing, dressing, and toileting, as well as greater overall supervision. At some point, you won’t be able to leave your loved one alone. Nighttime behaviors may not allow you to sleep, and with some patients, belligerent or aggressive behaviors may exceed your ability to cope or feel safe. Every situation is different. Sometimes the gap can be bridged by bringing in additional assistance, such as in-home help or other family members to share the caregiving burden. However, it is not a sign of weakness if moving to your loved one to a facility seems like the best plan of care. It’s never an easy decision to make, but when you’re overwhelmed by stress and fatigue, it’s difficult to maintain your caregiving standards. If the person with Alzheimer’s is living alone, or you as the primary caregiver have health problems, this option may need to be considered sooner rather than later. When considering your caregiving options, it’s important to consider whether you are able to balance your other obligations, either financial or to other family members. Will you be able to afford appropriate in-home coverage if you can’t continue caregiving? Talk to your loved one’s medical care team for their perspective as well. Evaluating an assisted living facility or nursing home If the best choice is to move the Alzheimer’s patient to a facility, it doesn’t mean you will no longer be involved in their care. You can still visit regularly and ensure your loved one gets the care he or she needs. Even if you are not yet ready to make that step, doing some initial legwork might save a lot of heartache in the case of a crisis where you have to move quickly. The first step is finding the right place for your loved one. Choosing a facility There are two main types of facilities that you will most likely have to evaluate for a loved one with Alzheimer’s: an assisted living facility or a nursing home. Assisted Living Assisted living is an option for those who need help with some activities of daily living. Some facilities provide minor help with medications as well. Staff is available twenty-four hours a day, but you will want to make sure they have experience handling residents with Alzheimer’s disease. Also be clear about what stage your loved may need to move to a higher level of care. Nursing homes Nursing homes provide assistance in both activities of daily living and a high level of medical care. A licensed physician supervises each resident’s care and a nurse or other medical professional is almost always on the premises. Skilled nursing care providers and medical professionals such as occupational or physical therapists are also available. How do I choose a facility? Once you’ve determined the appropriate level of care, you’ll want to visit the facility—both announced and unannounced—to meet with the staff and otherwise evaluate the home. You will also want to evaluate the facility based on their experience with Alzheimer’s residents. Facilities that cater specifically for Alzheimer’s patients should have a designated area, often called a special care unit in the U.S. For residents with dementia. Questions to ask such a facility include: Policy and procedures – Does the unit mix Alzheimer’s patients with those with mental illness, which can be dangerous? Does the program require the family to supply a detailed social history of the resident (a good sign)? Environment – Is the unit clean? Is the dining area large enough for all residents to use it comfortably? Are the doors alarmed or on a delayed opening system to prevent wandering? Is the unit too noisy? Staffing – What is the ratio of residents to staff? (5 to 1 during the day, 9 to 1 at night is normal). What is staff turnover like? How do they handle meals and ensure adequate hydration, since the person can often forget to eat or drink? How do they assess unexpressed pain—if the Alzheimer’s resident has pain but cannot communicate it? Staff training – What training for Alzheimer’s care do they have? Does the facility provide staff with monthly in-service training on Alzheimer’s care? Activities – Is there an activity plan for each resident based on the person’s interests and remaining cognitive strengths? Are residents escorted outside on a daily basis? Are regular outings planned for residents? Services – Does the unit provide hospice services? What were the findings in the most recent state survey? What to expect during a transition Moving is a big adjustment both for the person with Alzheimer’s and you as their caregiver. Your loved one is moving to a new home with new faces. You are adjusting from being the person providing hands-on care to being an advocate. Remember to give yourself and the Alzheimer’s patient time to adjust. If you’re expecting to move, try to have essentials packed and ready to go, and as many administrative details taken care of as possible, as sometimes beds can come up quickly. Work closely with staff regarding your loved one’s needs and preferences. An extra familiar face during moving day, such as another relative or close friend, can also help. Each person adjusts differently to this transition. Depending on your loved one’s needs, you may either need to visit more frequently or give your loved one their own space to adjust. As the adjustment period eases, you can settle into the visiting pattern that is best for both of you. I hope this helps.
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I want to know such type of medicine which avoids alcohol. I want to give it to my father.

Psychiatrist, Hubli-Dharwad
Hi. There are medicine which r given to make a person stop alcohol. But for that complete assessment and consent of the patient is required. please consult a de addiction specialist at the earliest.
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I am in very depression because I lost someone very important to me please give me some advice.

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DNB Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Nagpur
I am in very depression because I lost someone very important to me please give me some advice.
Losing someone close is a big loss and your state of mind is understandable. However you need to get over this and move on. This is going to take some time though. However if you feel your depressive thoughts are more than usual and it's getting difficult for you to go through this phase you can vouch a psychiatrist for help and counseling.
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He is in a serious relationship with a girl for 3 years He often complaints that his gf is least interested in getting physical whereas he is always making an initiative. Though they get physical he is not happy. Could you guide him as to how to deal with this .Thanks

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Chennai
Girls give sex for love. Ask him not to force upon the girl. Let him shower love and affection to her, rest will happen naturally and in the way he would like. Even then if the girl is not reciprocating, she can be taken to a psychiatrist to find out if she has hypoactive sexual desire disorder or sexual aversion disorder.
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How to forget the past and live the present what ever mistaken has been happened I can't able to over come the pasts. It always recalls me get fear some times think of my parents and my family. I need a good session.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
You need to have mind control and think of positive things and do meditation and yoga . Mix with good friends and think of good things .Counselling may also help
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Hello sir I am from Hyderabad. I am smoking from 2002. Present also I have a habit of smoking. Daily minimum 8 to 10 cigarettes I will smoke. Now I want to quit the smoking. So what type of medical check I have to do before quit. And how many days will take to clear my body from nicotine.

BHMS, DEMS
Homeopath, Pune
If you want quit smoking. Then its absolutely good. Quit early as soon as possible. No need to do medical test before quitting. Around in one year you r healthy person.
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