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Dr. Margoob Hussain

Veterinarian, Bangalore

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Dr. Margoob Hussain Veterinarian, Bangalore
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To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. Margoob Hussain
Dr. Margoob Hussain is a trusted Veterinarian in RT Nagar, Bangalore. He is currently practising at Patel Veterinary Clinic in RT Nagar, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Margoob Hussain and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 25 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Patel Veterinary Clinic

#234, 10th Cross, HMT Layout, R.T. NagarBangalore Get Directions
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My 6yr old Lab has dandruff.I have bathing him with medicated shampoo prescribed by his doctor.Not much of help.Please advice.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
Dandruff could be due to fugal infection , bacterial or skin infection so please do skin scrapping routine and bacterial and fungal culture
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Arthritis In Dogs - 7 Common Signs You Must Watch Out For!

M.V.Sc, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Kolkata
Arthritis In Dogs - 7 Common Signs You Must Watch Out For!

Like human beings, dogs along with other mammals too suffer from arthritis, particularly when they are aging. Younger dogs can also suffer from arthritic changes which can be painful and uncomfortable for the dog. This pain is caused by different signs and symptoms of arthritis and being aware of those signs can help you access early treatment and recovery.

  1. Limping on the legs: This is the first sign of arthritis when you see your dog limp on one or more of his legs. Under certain circumstances, the limp is seen to be in its severe state when the dog first rises and then it gradually becomes unnoticeable when the dog warms up.
  2. Difficulty in moving: The dog may be reluctant in moving or taking part in its favorite activities. It could be something like playing in the backyard or getting inside the car or going up and down the stairs. If this is the case with your dog, then you should not ignore it and look for medical assistance.
  3. Discomfort in the spinal region: Arthritic alterations may not only occur in the legs of the dog, but also in the several parts of its body. These alterations may result in abnormal posture, sore and swelling of the neck or lameness in the hind legs.
  4. Tiredness and fatigueYou may have known your dog to be very active, but these days, you see it become tired too easily. For your dogs, this could mean that the walks have shortened and even painful. When plagued by these conditions, your dog would want to spend most of its time resting and sleeping.
  5. Easily irritated: Arthritic animals, be it a cat or a dog is definite to be irritated very easily. Some of them may even bite or scratch when handled or approached. The condition is even worsened when the pet is handled in a way that triggers its arthritic pain.
  6. Dying off of the tissues in the muscle: When a dog suffers from arthritis, it may also cause muscle atrophy or dying off of the muscle owing to decreased movement of the muscle and inactivity. When the dog has muscle atrophy, the legs would become thinner than normal legs.
  7. Licking the affected area: Dogs who are suffering from arthritic pain may develop a habit of biting, chewing and licking the affected area. Even though it is normal to indulge in such activities, it may reach an extent where the area becomes inflamed or there is a loss of hair in those areas in the body.

It is not that your dog would all of these signs if it has arthritis and therefore, you must consult with a reputed veterinarian if you see any of these signs without further delay.

Finally osteoarthritis is a multifactorial disease. Genetic predisposition, inherited skeletal disorders like hip dysplasia, pollution factors inducing free radical damage may make your dog prone to oasteoarthiris. Obesity is a common factor which aggravates the sufferings. Dietary management, physical managements like controlled exercise & swimming, physiotherapy and feed supplements that protect joints & bone structures along with available commercial diets for nourishing those delicate structures may be a good gateway tovprovide your beloved pet a quality life. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can ask a free question.

3363 people found this helpful

He is 4 years old pomeranian dog. Weight 8 kg approx. He is losing his air in large amount everyday. He lives in my personal room. I feed him puppy gravy n eggs. N he never be in contact wid any stray dog. I gave him neomec injection. But I did not find any result. So please help. My dog. Tell me the best medicine and injection. Please.

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Hair loss is regular process in dogs, they shed their old hair and new hairs comes. Kindly brush daily with shredding brush, feed well balanced diet and use fatty acids supplements. You can have complete examination with your vet and he can advise best feeding scheduled and recommend supplements.
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Hi doc, my dog has developed a cherry eye. Is there a remedy other than surgery?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Surgery is the best option still can be tried with medication for a month and if not resolved please do the surgery its a elective surgery only no need to hurry .
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C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
What are the signs of rabies in dogs/cats?
Any change in normal behavior suggesting either undue aggression or depression.
Running aimlessly and attacking others without provocation.
Becomes too drowsy and withdraws to a corner.
Change in voice/bark.
Excessive salivation.
Refusal to feed or eating objects like stone, paper, wood, metal pieces etc.
6 people found this helpful

I have cone to know that tiles are not good for dogs? Is that true My dog can't grip on tiles or marble he slips also there is change in his way of walking So I make him walk on tough floor for 1.5 hours a day is that okay? He is just 40 days.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi lybrate-user, Yes, puppies may loose grip on too much smoothen tiles. Allow him to walk occasionally on non slippery floor to develop strength in the bones. At a time 1.5 hrs not required for your pup, give him a complete balanced diet.
1 person found this helpful
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My daughter, a female pug, 5 years old who has recently developed some grey rough patches near nail roots in left paw and a slightly bigger similar patch above with hair loss. Initially, her nails bled and we started applying ay fungal topicals. The patches are still there and occasionally she limps. Any suggestion is deeply appreciated.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dear sir its seems to be a skin infection please let me know the details with photos and previous treatement and other things so we could be discussing a lot.
1 person found this helpful
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Is giving oral anti tick pills safe for dogs? Does this medicine endectin10 has any adverse side effects? My dog has got ticks but i'm hesitating to give him this medicine. Kindly advice me with the better way.

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
There are better and safer options than endectin 10. As it may not be sufficient at all in case of heavy recurrent tick infestation. You can consult your vet Dr. And ask for spot on. It comes by diff names by diff companies. Try to go for the best one in your area. Just a small tube of liquid to be applied in your dog body at one spot. And you r done. In 20 min, even children can touch the body. Can repeat monthly if required. No side effects no wastage of time n money. No troublesome for animals like other oral or injectables.
1 person found this helpful
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Benefits of Dogs and Children Growing Up Together!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Constant Companionship

Although childhood isn't always easy, having a pet provides constant companionship through the ups and downs. Dogs can be a great source of comfort for kids — even when they're coming to grips with difficult life lessons. Whenever kids feel sad, angry, or afraid, they can always turn to their pet. Petting and cuddling dogs has also been shown to relieve stress and help people relax.

2. A More Active Lifestyle

Caring for a dog also encourages a more active lifestyle. In fact, a recent study showed that kids with dogs exercise eleven minutes a day more than their non-dog owning peers. That might not sound like a lot, but over a week or month, it really adds up. Many dogs require daily walks or runs and plenty of play time. Those adorable puppy eyes they give you are sure to motivate you — even when you're not feeling up to it.

3. Learning Responsibility

Having a pet is a great way to teach responsibility to kids. Making sure that the family dog has food and water gives children a first glimpse of accountability and obligation. Children also learn empathy and compassion by caring for their pet, while developing a higher level of self-esteem by taking care of their pet-owning responsibilities.

4. Health Is Wealth

Recent studies have found that babies raised in close contact with a pet get sick less often in their first year of life, meaning fewer visits to the doctor's office. Exposure to pet dander and the microbes that pets carry into the home from the outdoors is suggested to improve babies' developing immune systems. Research has also found that children who grow up with dogs experience a reduced risk of allergies.

5. Don't Worry, Be Happy!

Perhaps one of the greatest benefits of dogs in early childhood is simply that they make children happy! Interaction with animals has been proven to raise levels of serotonin and dopamine, which are the chemical building blocks of positive feelings. All science aside, playing and interacting with dogs is just plain fun — and it's bound to brighten any kid's day.

1 person found this helpful

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Home-prepared diet guidelines: You don’t need a spreadsheet or a degree in nutrition to feed your dog a complete and balanced diet.

Over the past few months, I have offered diet critiques that tweaked good home-prepared diets in order to address health concerns – or simply to optimize the diet. To do this, I analyzed the diets and compared them to the National Research Council’s guidelines for canine nutrition. I want to be clear, though: I don’t believe this is a requirement for feeding a home made diet. Just as with the diet you feed yourself and your family, feeding a wide variety of healthy foods in appropriate proportions should meet the needs of most healthy dogs.


Don’t bother trying to make every single one of your dog’s meal nutritionally complete; as long as he’s receiving what he needs over a week or two (often referred to as “balance over time”), he’ll be fine. This approach is similar to how we feed ourselves and our families.

Problems arise with how this description is interpreted.


Too often, people think that they’re feeding a healthy diet when key ingredients may be missing or are fed in excess. Here are specific guidelines to help ensure that the diet you feed meets your dog’s requirements.

Complete and Balanced

It’s important that the diet you feed your dog is “complete and balanced,” meaning it meets all of your dog’s nutritional needs. It is not important, however, that every meal be complete and balanced, unless you feed the same meal every day with little or no variation.

Home-prepared diets that include a wide variety of foods fed at different meals rely on balance over time, not at every meal. Similar to the way humans eat, as long as your dog gets everything he needs spread out over each week or two, his diet will be complete and balanced.

A human nutritionist would never expect someone to follow a single recipe with no variation, as veterinary nutritionists routinely do. Instead, a human would be given guidelines in terms of food groups and portion sizes. As long as your dog doesn't have a health problem that requires a very specific diet, there’s no reason you can’t do the same for your dog.

Keep in mind that puppies are more susceptible to problems caused by nutritional deficiencies or excesses than adult dogs are. Large-breed puppies are particularly at risk from too much calcium prior to puberty.

GUIDELINES

Following are guidelines for feeding a raw or cooked home made diet to healthy dogs. No single type of food, such as chicken, should ever make up more than half the diet.

Except where specified, foods can be fed either raw or cooked. Leftovers from your table can be included as long as they’re foods you would eat yourself, not fatty scraps.

Meat and Other Animal Products: Should always make up at least half of the diet. Many raw diets are excessively high in fat, which can lead to obesity. Another potential hazard of diets containing too much fat: If an owner restricts the amount fed (in order to control the dog’s weight) too much, the dog may suffer deficiencies of other required nutrients.

Unless your dog gets regular, intense exercise, use lean meats (no more than 10 percent fat), remove skin from poultry, and cut off separable fat. It’s better to feed dark meat poultry than breast, however, unless your dog requires a very low-fat diet.

Raw Meaty Bones (optional): If you choose to feed them, RMBs should make up one third to one half of the total diet. Use the lower end of the range if you feed bony parts such as chicken necks and backs, but you can feed more if you’re using primarily meatier parts such as chicken thighs. Never feed cooked bones.

Boneless Meat: Include both poultry and red meat. Heart is a good choice, as it is lean and often less expensive than other muscle meats.

Fish: Provides vitamin D, which otherwise should be supplemented. Canned fish with bones, such as sardines (packed in water, not oil), jack mackerel, and pink salmon, are good choices. Remove bones from fish you cook yourself, and never feed raw Pacific salmon, trout, or related species. You can feed small amounts of fish daily, or larger amounts once or twice a week. The total amount should be about one ounce of fish per pound of other meats (including RMBs).

Organs: Liver should make up roughly 5 percent of this category, or about one ounce of liver per pound of other animal products. Beef liver is especially nutritious, but include chicken or other types of liver at least occasionally as well. Feeding small amounts of liver daily or every other day is preferable to feeding larger amounts less often.


Fruits such as melon, berries, bananas, apples, pears, and papayas can be included in your dog’s food or given as training treats.

Eggs: Highly nutritious addition to any diet. Dogs weighing about 20 pounds can have a whole egg every day, but give less to smaller dogs.

Dairy: Plain yogurt and kefir are well tolerated by most dogs (try goat’s milk products if you see problems). Cottage and ricotta cheese are also good options. Limit other forms of cheese, as most are high in fat.

Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious.

Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.

Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.

Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs.

Grains: Controversial, as they may contribute to inflammation caused by allergies, arthritis, or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); as well as seizures and other problems (it’s not clear whether starchy vegetables do the same). Some grains contain gluten that may cause digestive problems for certain dogs. Many dogs do fine with grains, however, and they can be used to reduce the overall cost of feeding a home made diet.

Grains and starchy veggies should make up no more than half the diet. Good choices include oatmeal, brown rice, quinoa, barley, and pasta. White rice can be used to settle an upset stomach, particularly if overcooked with extra water, but it’s low in nutrition and should not make up a large part of the diet. All grains must be well cooked.

SUPPLEMENTS
Some supplements are required. Others may be needed if you are not able to feed a variety of foods, or if you leave out one or more of the food groups above. In addition, the longer food is cooked or frozen, the more nutrients are lost. Here are some supplements to consider:

Calcium: Unless you feed RMBs, all homemade diets must be supplemented with calcium. The amount found in multivitamin and mineral supplements is not enough. Give 800 to 1,000 mg calcium per pound of food (excluding non-starchy vegetables). You can use any form of plain calcium, including eggshells ground to powder in a clean coffee grinder (1/2 teaspoon eggshell powder provides about 1,000 mg calcium). Animal Essentials’ Seaweed Calcium provides additional minerals, as well.

Oils: Most homemade diets require added oils for fat, calories, and to supply particular nutrients. It’s important to use the right types of oils, as each supplies different nutrients.

Fish Oil: Provides EPA and DHA, omega-3 fatty acids that help to regulate the immune system and reduce inflammation. Give an amount that provides about 300 mg EPA and DHA combined per 20 to 30 pounds of body weight on days you don’t feed fish. Note that liquid fish oil supplements often tell you to give much more than this, which can result in too many calories from fat.

Cod Liver Oil: Provides vitamins A and D as well as EPA and DHA. If you don’t feed much fish, give cod liver oil in an amount that provides about 400 IUs vitamin D daily for a 100-pound dog (proportionately less for smaller dogs). Can be combined with other fish oil to increase the amount of EPA and DHA if desired.


Top-quality fish body oil and cod liver oil can provide your dog’s diet with valuable omega-3 fatty acids. Be cautious about feeding the amounts suggested on the labels, however; these often supply too much fat.

Plant Oils: If you don’t feed much poultry fat, found in dark meat and skin, linoleic acid, an essential omega-6 fatty acid, may be insufficient. You can use walnut, hempseed, corn, vegetable (soybean), or high-linoleic safflower oil to supply linoleic acid if needed. Add about one teaspoon of oil per pound of meat and other animal products, or twice that amount if using canola or sunflower oil. Olive oil and high-oleic safflower oil are low in omega-6 and cannot be used as a substitute, although small amounts can be added to supply fat if needed. Coconut oil provides mostly saturated fats, and can be used in addition to but not as a replacement for other oils.

Other Vitamins and Minerals: In addition to vitamin D discussed above, certain vitamins and minerals may be short in some homemade diets, particularly those that don’t include organ meats or vegetables. The more limited the diet that you feed, the more important supplements become, but even highly varied diets are likely to be light in a few areas.

Vitamin E: All homemade diets I’ve analyzed have been short on vitamin E, and the need for vitamin E increases when you supplement with oils. Too much vitamin E, however, may be counterproductive. Give 1 to 2 IUs per pound of body weight daily.

Iodine: Too much or too little iodine can suppress thyroid function, and it’s hard to know how much is in the diet. A 50-pound dog needs about 300 mcg (micrograms) of iodine daily. Kelp is high in iodine, though the amount varies considerably among supplements.

Multivitamin and mineral supplements: A multivitamin and mineral supplement will help to meet most requirements, including iodine and vitamins D and E, but it’s important not to oversupplement minerals. If using the one-a-day type of human supplements, such as Centrum for Adults under 50, give one per 40 to 50 pounds of body weight daily. Note that most supplements made for dogs provide a reasonable amount of vitamins but are low in minerals, and so won’t make up for deficiencies in the diet. Be cautious with small dogs; I’ve seen some supplements that recommend the same dosage for 10-pound dogs as for those weighing 50 or even 100 pounds. In those cases, the dosage is usually too high for the small dogs and should be reduced. Products made for humans are also inappropriate for small dogs.

Green Blends: Often containing alfalfa and various herbs, green blends may be especially helpful if you don’t include many green vegetables in your dog’s diet. You can also use a pre-mix that includes alfalfa and vegetables, such as The Honest Kitchen’s Preference. Note most pre-mixes also supply calcium, so you should reduce or eliminate calcium supplements, depending on how much of the pre-mix you use.

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4 people found this helpful

Hi, Doctor I am having a 50 days old female dachshund. It use to make some kind of sound through out the night ? Is there any reason fr it ? & is there any special care I have to GV to my puppy in this age.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Might be worm load in his stomach, can cause same type of problem . and also please consult a vet near by as its very young age on table prescription will have danger
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My pet dog is 2.5 months, he is always upto biting us and scratching walls to lick the plaster. Sometimes he use to dig the soil in park and try yo eat that. Is it normal or we should give him some treatmemt? thanks.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Teething has started with him please give him lot of artificial bone or dog toys to safe guard our valuable thing at lie on the floor level. Try to feed him in dog food as far as possible.
2 people found this helpful
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Holi - Spare the Pets!
Do not, under any circumstances, use colours or bhang on these helpless creatures as the consequences could be fatal. The presence of lead, which acts as an accumulative poison, makes Holi colours a high-risk material for dogs. Inhalation of the coloured powder may also cause nasal irritation and possibly respiratory allergy or infection. Most dogs get paranoid when you rub colours on them, since it very often gets into their eyes and nose, making them very uncomfortable. Dogs and us are not the same make, so this Holi, let?s keep the colors off the animals!
(Re-shared, from Speaking Tree.)
3 people found this helpful

I have a pug female dog. She is 1 year old and she has the problem of bleeding what should I do?

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Dear lybrate-user bleeding from which body part please clarify. If it is from its genital area and its mild, it could be due to her heat period. Along with bleeding there may be slight swelling of her visible genital parts. Please share photograph and name o bleeding part to give you precise advise.
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Protect Your Dog in the Summer

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem

8 Things You Can Do to Protect Your Dog in the Summer

  1. Never, ever leave your dog in the car;
  2. Make sure your dog has unlimited access to fresh water;
  3. Make sure your dog has access to shade when outside;
  4. Take walks during the cooler hours of the day;
  5. When walking, try to stay off of hot surfaces (like asphalt) because it can burn your dog's paws;
  6. If you think it's hot outside, it's even hotter for your pet – make sure your pet has a means of cooling off;
  7. Keep your dog free of external parasites (fleas, ticks) and heartworms – consult your veterinarian about the best product for your pet;
  8. Consider clipping or shaving dogs with long coats (talk to your veterinarian first to see if it's appropriate for your pet), and apply sunscreen to your dog's skin if she or he has a thin coat.
3 people found this helpful

I am from dhanbad I have a cow two days before she has eaten excess food grains due to which her stomach become very tight now she is not eating any thing so please help me what I do?

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Your cow is suffering from acidosis due to eating excess food grains. Give plenty of water and feed only greens if it takes for 2-3 days. Give RUMENTAS 2 boli 2 times daily for 3 days and also give BLONIL Liquid orally 50 ml 2 times daily for 2 days.
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How many eggs do you think were released by the ovary of a female dog which give birth to 6 puppies?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Might have definitely released more than 6 eggs. But they mature in 48hrs after getting released in the fallopian tube. Now in that duration the sperm cell in the berth canal should also b viable. So either 6 eggs got matured and conceived by the viable sperm or probably more got matured but the viable sperm cells were less. Hope you r not confused.
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My dog is having high fever with blood in motion and also vomiting since 1 day. He is 3 months old. Please tell me what to do? please

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
May be of parvo diarrhoea . please investigate about vaccination history and also treat with a vet with fluids for at least 5 days
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My kitten paw is bleeding. I took him to the vet she cleaned it and gave him injection but still he is not fine he has started limping.

master of veterinary science
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Its quite natural that he is limping it will take time to heal and you will need a follow up with your vet.
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RESPECTED SIR, MY DOG NAME IS "TIGER" BRED IS LABRADOR, I HAVE ONLY ONE PROBLEM FOR MY DOG. SKIN PROBLEM ,

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi, what type of skin problem ? hair loss / dandruff / scratching all the time? deworm first, give wokazole dip once in a week and support with good diet.
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