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Dr. Kapisoor Singh  - Radiologist, Bangalore

Dr. Kapisoor Singh

MBBS, MD - Radio Diagnosis

Radiologist, Bangalore

17 Years Experience  ·  350 at clinic
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Dr. Kapisoor Singh MBBS, MD - Radio Diagnosis Radiologist, Bangalore
17 Years Experience  ·  350 at clinic
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Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I’m dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies. Doctor is an active mem......more
To provide my patients with the highest quality dental care, I’m dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies. Doctor is an active member of Indian Radiological and Imaging Association, Indian Society of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (ISVIR), Indian Society of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (ISVIR)
More about Dr. Kapisoor Singh
Dr. Kapisoor Singh is an experienced Radiologist in Kumaraswamy Layout, Bangalore. He has over 17 years of experience as a Radiologist. He is a MBBS, MD - Radio Diagnosis . You can consult Dr. Kapisoor Singh at Sagar Hospitals, Banashankari in Kumaraswamy Layout, Bangalore. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Kapisoor Singh on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Radiologists in India. You will find Radiologists with more than 42 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Radiologists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Specialty
Education
MBBS - King George's Medical College - 2001
MD - Radio Diagnosis - King George's Medical College - 2005
Languages spoken
English
Professional Memberships
Indian Radiological and Imaging Association
Indian Society of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (ISVIR)
Indian Society of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (ISVIR)

Location

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Sagar Hospitals, Banashankari

Shavige Malleshwara Hills, Dayananda Sagar Institution campus, Kumaraswamy Layout.Bangalore Get Directions
350 at clinic
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I'm 25 years old. I've mild disk bulge in L4 and L5. Whether I can lead normal life or not? And it's curable completely or not? Pls tell me.

Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons (FRCS), Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS)
Orthopedist, Trichy
Mild disc bulge is nothing serious. As long as you do not have any back pain radiating to your legs then the nerve roots are not getting compressed. Make sure you do not lift heavy objects or strain urself, avoid long distance 2 and 4 wheeler rides, back exercises help.
2 people found this helpful
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My mother is suffering from disc extrusion in L5, is surgery necessary? Or something other will be helpful.

MPT - Orthopedic Physiotherapy, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Noida
My mother is suffering from disc extrusion in L5, is surgery necessary? Or something other will be helpful.
avoid surgery do physiotherapy treatment for few days and spine stretching and strength exercise. avoid long sitting toward bending lifting weight. posture correction must
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I am 54 year old male having MRI [LS-SPINE]. Finding Reveal Annular Tear, circumferential Disc Bulge With Small Posterocentral Protrusion at L4-L5 level, Causing No Significant Neural Compression Or Canal Stenosis" I have no pain anywhere since 5 months only difficulty in standing or on walking without pain. Become tired for few seconds, then start again walking. Ortho. Says no need to worry it will heal naturally. Spine Surgeon says need of "DISC FIX" treatment required. Getting confuse. WHAT TO DO.'

MBBS
General Physician,
Hi, Thanks for your question. I do understand your pain and discomfort. As per your history is concerned please follow: 1)If there is no neuro deficit then no need of surgical treatment so wait for that time to come during this time do physiotherapy and steroid treatment . I hope I was able to address your query. If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to write to me. Wishing you all the best. Thanks
1 person found this helpful
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Breast Cancer - 8 Things You Must Do To Avoid it!

DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MBBS
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Breast Cancer - 8 Things You Must Do To Avoid it!

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in women about 1 in 8 women in the USA develop invasive breast cancer. The incidence of breast cancer has increased with changes in lifestyle including smoking, drinking and loss of physical activity. The risk factors are age, ethnicity and family history cannot be changed. However, there are some risk factors that can definitely be acted upon to reduce the chances of developing breast cancer.

  1. Weight management: Obesity is one of the major risk factors for breast cancer and managing weight and a good body mass index will help reduce the risk of developing breast cancer. This is especially important in women undergoing menopause.
  2. Reducing smoking: The benefits of quitting it are manifold and reducing the risk for breast cancer is one of them. This will, as a byproduct, also result in a host of other benefits including improved quality of life, reduced chances of heart disease, stroke, and other cancers.
  3. Physical activity: In addition to helping in weight management, this also helps reduce the risk of breast cancer. Ideal recommendation is 30 minutes of physical activity per day, plus strength training.
  4. Breastfeeding: This helps in reducing the risk of breast cancer. Prolonged feeding is shown to have a greater protective benefit.
  5. Hormone replacement therapy: When possible, limit the use of hormone replacement therapy for prolonged periods of time. Explore options of non-hormonal substitutes or use the least permissible or required dose. Be sure to get periodic check-ups when on hormone therapy.
  6. Reduce exposure to environmental pollution: Higher levels of pollutants are linked to a higher incidence of breast cancer. When possible, avoid getting exposure to environmental pollutants.
  7. Screening: If there is a strong family history or other risk factors, then screening can help detect breast cancer very early in the process. Recommended ages for mammography are as follows:
    • If you are age 40 – 44: Go for annual mammograms after discussing risks and benefits with the doctor.
    • If you are age 45 – 54: Go for annual mammogram.
    • If you are age 55 or over: Mammograms are recommended every other year. You can choose to continue to have them every year. Self-breast exams are not sufficient. However, if being done, they can also be an input to an abnormality.
  8. Cautious use of birth control pills: Birth control pill usage to be discussed with your gynaecologist if you are above 35 years of age and smoke. The good news is that the risk associated with it disappears slowly after the pill is stopped.

These will help reduce the risk of developing breast cancer, early detection, and improved prognosis.

12 people found this helpful

An Overview Of Bone Cancer

MD - Oncology
Oncologist, Hubli-Dharwad
An Overview Of Bone Cancer

Bone cancer is a cancerous tumour in the bone, destroying the normal bone tissues. Tumours on bone tissues are not always cancerous or malignant, they are mostly benign. Primary bone cancer is when the malignant tumour begins to form in the tissues of the bones, but when these cancerous cells spread to other body parts like breasts, prostate or lungs, it is called metastatic cancer. Primary bone cancer is less common than metastatic cancer.

Bone cancer can be of three different types:

  1. Osteosarcoma: In this case, the malignant tumour arises from the osteoid bone tissue. This occurs mainly in the upper arm and knee areas.

  2. Chondrosarcoma: In this case the cancerous cells form in the cartilaginous tissues, causing a lot of pain. This occurs mostly in the pelvic area.

  3. The Ewing sarcoma generally arises in the bone but it can also form in the soft tissues. Other kinds of soft tissues affecting cancerous cells are known as soft tissue sarcomas.

Causes-

There aren’t many clear defined causes; however, several factors have been identified by researchers.

  1. Osteosarcoma is seen to occur more frequently in people who have been through a high external radiation therapy dose.

  2. In people who have frequently been treated with anticancer medications, children tend to be most affected.

  3. Heredity may be an adding cause, although the percentage of hereditary transfer of cancer cells is very low.

  4. People with hereditary bone defects or implants have a higher chance of acquiring bone cancer.

Symptoms-

The most common and saddening symptom of bone cancer is painful, although not all bone cancers cause pain. Unusual or persistent swelling or pain around a bone maybe a red flag for bone cancer. In case of a situation like this, immediate doctor’s opinion is required.

Diagnosis-

Usually, diagnosis of a bone cancer can be made using X-rays; for example, a bone scan, a computed tomography scan, a magnetic imaging procedure—positron emission tomography, and an angiogram. Biopsy and blood tests are also helpful in bone cancer diagnosis.

Treatment-

The size, location and stage of cancer, age, and health of the person decide the kind of treatment that should be given to the patient. Various treatment options include chemotherapy, radiation therapy and cryosurgery.

Survival-

The combined survival rate of all sorts of bone cancers is 70%. This percentage may vary with the type of bone cancer and also its stage.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3256 people found this helpful

I am 27 year boy I have back pain l4 and l5 disk light move. I there any full relief treatment means contact me sir. Back pain person do sex fully or not. After two month marriage fixed so im tired.

BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Delhi
I am 27 year boy I have back pain l4 and l5 disk light move. I there any full relief treatment means contact me sir. ...
Start with physiotherapy treatment. Learn spinal exercise. Don't sit on floor. Don't lift heavy things. Share your x ray report for further discussion.
1 person found this helpful
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Cervical Lordosis Straightening Treatment

BPTh/BPT, MPTh/MPT
Physiotherapist, Noida
Cervical Lordosis Straightening Treatment

Most commonly known as a military neck a straight or forward curve of the neck is abnormal and may cause an unkind progression of symptoms leading ultimately to cervical disk degeneration.

Reversal of cervical lordosis explained

The anatomy of the neck features a lordotic curvature in its typical and healthy state. This means that the cervical region has a gentle curvature with the open end of that curve facing the rear of the body. The base and top of the curve will be further posterior than the mid point, which will be further anterior.

When the lordosis is straightened, the neck becomes more upright and linear. This is more common than the next progression of atypical curvature, which is the subject of this article.

Actual reversal of curvature means that part or all of the cervical spine develops a kyphotic profile, with the open end of the curve facing anteriorly. Usually, this reversal is extremely mild, but is still very abnormal. What we now see is the middle of the curve being positioned posterior to the top and bottom.

In essence, picture the letter c and now turn it backwards: This is the shape of a reversed cervical lordosis.

Reversal of cervical lordosis causes

The spinal curvature in the neck is constantly in flux to some degree.

Congenital conditions and developmental conditions can have lasting effects on the natural degree of curvature typically demonstrated from patient to patient. These circumstances may be explainable due to injury or degeneration, or may be idiopathic:

Scoliosis can affect the normal lordotic curvature in the neck.

Cervical spondylolisthesis is a major source of reversed lordotic curvature.

Severe disc pathologies can facilitate a gradual loss or reversal of cervical lordosis.

Vertebral irregularities, such as wedging, can definitely contribute to lordotic alteration.

Traumatic injury, including vertebral fracture, can create the ideal circumstances for a reversal of lordosis to take place.

Severe neck muscle spasms can actually reshape the spinal curves, although these are usually temporary expressions and not actual structural conditions.

Effects of reversal of cervical lordosis
The neck is designed to curve in order to balance the spine, absorb stress, distribute force and provide proper movement of the head. When this curvature is diminished or reversed, symptoms may result, although this is not an inherent part of any altered lordotic condition.

Patients may experience stiffness and tension in the neck. Pain may be present and may even be severe in rare cases. Neurological dysfunction is possible in extreme cases, since the neuroforamen might not align properly, thereby causing a cervical pinched nerve.

In the worst circumstances, central spinal stenosis in the neck might affect the viability of the spinal cord, possible enacting the most dire of symptoms throughout the body.

Patients will also be more prone to injury, since the normal shock absorption qualities of the typical curvature have been lost.

While all these effects are certainly possible, they are not usual. In fact, a great majority of patients have minor symptoms or even no symptoms at all from mild reversed lordotic curvatures.

The pathology leading to a neck curve reversal (cervical kyphosis shown below right) may be inspired by a multitude of conditions as follows:
Post whiplash
Post head injury
Stomach sleeping
Poor sitting/working postures
Congenital spinal curvatures
Osteoporosis
Degenerative cervical discs (a form of osteoarthritis that can either be the cause of or the result of a cervical kyphosis)
Compression fracture of vertebral body
Infection of the cervical spine

Anatomy: straight vs. Curved

I've always heard that it was good to stand up straight.

stand upright, stick your chest out and hold your shoulders back! otherwise you're going get widows hump.

Are these expressions as familiar to you as they are to me? one might think that having a curved neck goes against what we heard from parents and teachers as we were growing up, but the reality is that there is a little bit a truth in both. Maintaining good posture throughout our lives is crucial to both the health of our spine and vital organs. On the contrary, a special type of curve called a lordosis is a good thing, both in the neck and lower back.

When we look at a person from the back their spine should be truly straight, so that the left and right sides of one's body is symmetrical. However, when we view a person from the side, the front and back of their body is different and this is reflected in a coinciding curvature of the spine. Both the lower back and neck are hollowed out (concave) and the mid or thoracic spine is protrudes (convex). Thus there is an alternation of curves functioning to provide stability, shock absorption and aid in propulsion. A straight spine would be very stiff and not flexible. Imagine the plight of a pole vaulter with an inflexible pole.

Nature's design of our spine and rib cage facilitates breathing and offers protective and supportive framework for vital organs. Spinal disks are shock absorbers and because they are in the front of the spine, lordotic curvatures keep them from having to bear weight. Kyphosis or loss of such curvatures bears weight upon the disks, leading to their ultimate degeneration. This process of deterioration is a form of osteoarthritis and in the spine is known as degenerative spondylosis.

Diagnosis
Although most physiotherapists or conservative orthopedists can recognize a cervical curve reversal upon viewing the patient's posture, a definitive diagnosis may be obtained via a standing lateral (side view) x-ray of the neck. Cause can often be determined by corroborating a comprehensive history, a thorough examination, x-rays and questions about sleep, work and lifestyle.

In my professional career I found that the majority of young adults presenting with cervical kyphosis either had a whiplash or were stomach sleepers from an early age. For desk jockeys 40-60 years of age, many hours of sitting with their head flexed forward almost dictates the fate of developing kyphosis. In prior years I considered cervical kyphosis a job hazard for the careers of accountants, attorneys and often teachers because of years spent with their head in a book or paperwork. However, the digital age offers some relief in that respect. A well-planned, ergonomically-friendly office can do wonders for protecting the spine in the sedentary worker.

Treatment for cervical curve reversal (kyphosis)
During my chiropractic practice I had the opportunity to note a good percentage of correction toward a more normal lordosis (noted on x-ray) for 70% of patients under my care. This was almost always consistent with those patients that followed all recommendations and were model participants in their own care. Here is the recommended treat plan:

Spinal manipulation of stiff and fixated spinal segments by a qualified physio
Flexibility exercises for flexion and extension of cervical spine
Resistance exercises for flexors and extensors of the neck
Learn the Alexander technique for maintaining good posture (hint: the basic philosophy is to sit and stand like you were hanging by a string from the vertex of your skull. Liken it to a puppet on a string).
Elimination of stomach sleeping
Avoid standing on your head, although some yoga postures may be beneficial
Use of orthopedic neck pillow while sleeping.

4 people found this helpful

Breast Cancer - Signs That Help You Spot It!

MBBS, DNB - Surgery, Fellowship in Breast Surgical Oncology
Oncologist, Gurgaon
Breast Cancer - Signs That Help You Spot It!

Breast cancer is an abnormal growth of cells in the tissues of the breast. Mainly it occurs in females but less than 1% of all the breast cancer cases develop in males. The majority of breast cancers start in the milk ducts. A small number start in the milk sacs or lobules. It can spread to the lymph nodes and to the other parts of the body such as bones, liver, lungs and to the brain.

With more reliable early detection methods as well as the trend towards less invasive surgery, there is hope that even more women with breast cancer will be treated successfully and will go on to resume their normal lives.

Signs & Symptoms 
It is painless, especially, during the early stage. Watch out for the following changes in the breast:

  1. A persistent lump or thickening in the breast or in the axilla. 
  2. A change in the size or shape of the breast. 
  3. A change in the colour or appearance of the skin of the breast such as redness, puckering or dimpling. 
  4. Bloody discharge from the nipple. 
  5. A change in the nipple or areola such as scaliness, persistent rash or nipple retraction (nipple pulled into the breast).

Consult a doctor immediately if you notice any of these changes.

Risk Factors 
Being a woman puts you at risk of getting breast cancer. There are certain factors that increase the risk of breast cancer. Some of them have been listed below:

  1. The risk increases with age; most cases of breast cancer develop after the age of 50 
  2. Genetic alterations in certain genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2 
  3. Family history of breast cancer 
  4. Being overweight 
  5. Early menarche (onset of menstruation before the age of 12) 
  6. Late menopause (after the age of 55) 
  7. Never had children 
  8. Late childbearing 
  9. No breast feeding 
  10. Excessive consumption of alcohol 
  11. Use of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) for a long period of time

However, most women who have breast cancer have none of the above risk factors. Likewise, not having any of these risk factors does not mean that you will not get breast cancer.

Early Detection and Screening

More treatment options are available when breast cancer is diagnosed at an early stage and hence the chances of recovery is also higher. So regular breast screening is important for early detection even if there are no symptoms. Following are the ways of screening:

  1. Breast Self-Examination (BSE): Perform BSE once a month about a week after your menses are over. If you no longer menstruate, choose a date each month which is easy to remember e.g. your date of birth or anniversary.
  2. Clinical Breast Examination: Get a breast specialist to examine your breast once a year if you are 40 years and above.
  3. Mammogram: Go for a screening mammogram once a year if you are 40 to 49 years old and once every two years if you are 50 years and above even if you do not have any symptom. It is not recommended for younger women (less than 40 years of age) as they have dense breasts, making it difficult for small changes to be detected on a mammogram. So ultrasonography of the breasts is advisable to them.

Types of Breast cancer

  1. Non-Invasive Breast cancer: These are confined to the ducts within the breasts. They are known as Ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS).
  2. Invasive Breast cancer: It occurs when cancer cells spread beyond the ducts or lobules. Cancer cells first spread to the surrounding breast tissue and subsequently to the lymph nodes in the armpit (Axillary lymph nodes). These cells can also travel to the other parts of the body such as bones, liver, lungs or brain and hence known as metastatic breast cancer.

Making A Diagnosis 

If you notice any unusual changes in your breasts, you should see a doctor immediately. He will examine you clinically and may ask you to undergo some tests so that a definitive diagnosis can be made. Further, the staging work up is done to find out the stage of the disease and management accordingly.

Treatment options 
Treatment of breast cancer may include various methods such as surgery with or without breast reconstruction, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormonal therapy and targeted therapy. Treatment options offered, depend upon the number of factors such as the stage of cancer and likelihood of cure, your general health and your preference. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an oncologist.

1932 people found this helpful

Dear doctor, One of my relative suffered due to minor brain stroke She gave birth to baby by cesarean just a week before the stroke. Is there any relation between delivery and stroke. Kindly let me know. Note She is 30 years old female.

MS - General Surgery, MBBS, MCh - Neuro Surgery
Neurosurgeon, Hyderabad
Some strokes can occur due to dehydration even. One of the common causes of strokes after or around childbirth is cerebral venous thrombosis. This is can be easily identified and precautions can be taken to prevent recurrent episodes.
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