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Dr. K. Dinakaran

Veterinarian, Bangalore

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Dr. K. Dinakaran Veterinarian, Bangalore
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Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences....more
Our team includes experienced and caring professionals who share the belief that our care should be comprehensive and courteous - responding fully to your individual needs and preferences.
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Dr. K. Dinakaran is a renowned Veterinarian in Banaswadi, Bangalore. You can meet Dr. K. Dinakaran personally at Dinakaran's Veterinary Clinic in Banaswadi, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. K. Dinakaran on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Veterinarians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Veterinarians with more than 30 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Dinakaran's Veterinary Clinic

10 Lakshmamma Layout 1st A Cross, BanaswadiBangalore Get Directions
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I was bitten by my pet dog near my mouth, I did not got vaccinated after bitten by my dog, bt my dog has been vaccinated, so do I still have a chance of getting infected by rabies?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Normally if your pet dog is vaccinated, then no need to for vaccination. You have to make sure your pet dog is vaccinated in last one year.
2 people found this helpful
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My dog. Labrador. 5 yrs old has thyroid. He is been told to have thyroxine sodium tablet. 100mg everyday in the morning empty stomach. Is the medication fine for him. Please let me know.

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
The treatment for hypothyroidism advised to your pet is alright. The protocol for treating such patients vary according to the condition of the pet, requirement of dose depending on the test reports and its clinical manifestation. So it is not possible to give any advice without examining the patient and its blood reports. Better have an opinion from nearby vet after examination only. Thank you.
6 people found this helpful
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Basha The Dog is having tumor at his back thie rarely bleeding ,please suggest a best medication it is from andhra pradesh

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
The tumor should be checked properly. Take the dog to near by vet to check whether it is just abscess or malignant tumor. Check the tumor. Is it hard, has any point like etc. Tumor should be seen in person before treatment.
1 person found this helpful
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What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

B.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Ballia
What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

Bleeding pets often suffer blood loss as a result of trauma. If bleeding is severe or continuous, the animal may lose enough blood to cause shock (loss of as little as 2 teaspoons per pound of body weight may cause shock). Emergencies may arise that require the owner to control the bleeding, even if it is just during transport of the animal to the veterinary facility. Pet owners should know how to stop hemorrhage (bleeding) if their pet is injured.

 Techniques to stop external bleeding:-

 The following techniques are listed in order of preference. 

1) Direct pressure:--gently press a compress (a pad of clean cloth or gauze) over the bleeding absorbing the blood and allowing it to clot. Do not disturb blood clots after they have formed. If blood soaks through, do not remove the pad; simply add additional layers of cloth and continue the direct pressure more evenly. The compress can be bound in place using bandage material which frees the hands of the first provider for other emergency actions. In the absence of a compress, a bare hand or finger can be used. Direct pressure on a wound is the most preferable way to stop bleeding.

2) Elevation:--if there is a severely bleeding wound on the foot or leg, gently elevate the leg so that the wound is above the level of the heart. Elevation uses the force of gravity to help reduce blood pressure in the injured area, slowing the bleeding. Elevation is most effective in larger animals with longer limbs where greater distances from wound to heart are possible. Direct pressure with compresses should also be maintained to maximize the use of elevation. Elevation of a limb combined with direct pressure is an effective way to stop bleeding. 

3) Pressure on the supplying artery:-- if external bleeding continues following the use of direct pressure and elevation, finger or thumb pressure over the main artery to the wound is needed. Apply pressure to the femoral artery in the groin for severe bleeding of a rear leg; to the brachial artery in the inside part of the upper front leg for bleeding of a front leg; or to the caudal artery at the base of the tail if the wound is on the tail. Continue application of direct pressure.

4) Pressure above and below the bleeding wound:-- this can also be used in conjunction with direct pressure. Pressure above the wound will help control arterial bleeding. Pressure below the wound will help control bleeding from veins.

5) Tourniquet:--use of a tourniquet is dangerous and it should be used only for a severe, life-threatening hemorrhage in a limb (leg or tail) not expected to be saved. A wide (2-inch or more) piece of cloth should be used to wrap around the limb twice and tied into a knot. A short stick or similar object is then tied into the knot as well. Twist the stick to tighten the tourniquet until the bleeding stops. Secure the stick in place with another piece of cloth and make a written note of the time it was applied. Loosen the tourniquet for 15 to 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Remember this is dangerous and will likely result in disability or amputation. Use of a tourniquet should only be employed as a last-resort, life-saving measure!

6) Internal bleeding:--internal bleeding is a life-threatening condition, but it is not obvious like external bleeding. Any bleeding which is visible is external. 
Internal bleeding occurs inside the body and will not be seen. There are, however, external signs of internal bleeding: 
• the pet is pale (check the gums or eyelids).
• the pet is cool on the legs, ears, or tail. 
• the pet is extremely excited or unusually subdued. If any of these signs are evident, the pet should be immediately transported to a veterinary facility for professional help. Remember: internal bleeding is not visible on the outside.

My cat is not taking his meal seems last 3 days, he is not playing seems last 5 days, he is sleeping only, his health is getting bad day by day. What should I do? Please suggest fast.

bachelor of veterinary & Animal Husbandary
Veterinarian, Noida
I would suggest better not to delay further, take it vet and get it checked thoroughly otherwise it will be difficult to save the cat. At for now, if can get royal canin recovery canned food, try now itself. Hopefully cat will eat immediately.
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Top 10 Banned Dog Breeds


Even though it seems outdated and unfair, breed-specific laws continue to exist across the globe in order to attempt to reduce the number of dangerous dogs. Enforcing these laws is extremely costly and difficult, but certain breeds of dogs continue to be outlawed because they are deemed “threatening.” Here are 10 dog breeds that are currently banned in the world.

10. Tosa Inu
Tosa Inus happen to be massive dogs with certain variations that have a weight anywhere between 130 pounds and 200 pounds. They bred to be fighting dogs right from the start and they are legally prohibited in several countries like Denmark, Malta and Norway, where they are regarded as dangerous.

9. Pit Bulls
Pit Bulls were originally bred to bait bears and bulls. Several studies have allegedly indicated that Pit Bulls are responsible for up to 45% human attacks by dogs, particularly children. Thus, Pit Bulls are restricted all over the world, especially in Miami and the UK.

8. Perro de Presa Canario
Perro de Presa Canarios are large dogs that were originally bred to work lifestock. Early obedience training and socialization is essential for these dogs, and yet they can be aggressive. After reports of killings, this dog breed was banned in Australia and New Zealand.

7. Neapolitan Mastiff
Even though Neapolitan Mastiffs are not associated with dangerous dogs, owning them is illegal in Singapore. A psychological evaluation has to be passed by a Neapolitan Mastiff in order to own one in Romania. Fully grown Neapolitan Mastiffs that weigh almost 200 pounds can be dangerous.

6. Fila Brasileiro
Also referred to as Brazillian Mastiffs, these large dogs were developed in Brazil. Their tracking abilities tend to be remarkable, but at the same time, their aggressiveness and strength tends to be quite terrible. Perhaps this is why Denmark, Israel, Malta, Norway and the UK banned this dog breed.

5. Dogo Argentino
These large and white muscular dogs were developed in Argentina mainly for big-game hunting, especially puma and wild boar. Although they were bred not be aggressive, they happen to be athletic and extremely strong. Thus, owning a Dogo in Australia, New Zealand, Portugal and the UK is illegal.

4. Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is just one example of wolf hybrid breeds, many of which are illegal to keep as pets. There have been particular reports about attacks by wolfdog breeds, especially on children who are viewed as prey items, which is just one example that they possess wolf-like instincts.

3. Boerboel
Boerboels were originally bred to guard the homestead. There was a time when they were a first line of denfese against predators like hyenas, lions and other big cats. However, after being recognized as fighting dogs, this breed was banned in Denmark in 2010.

2. American Bulldog
American bulldogs are heavy muscular dogs. Despite being known for their friendly and pleasant demeanor, American Bulldogs tend to be extremely confident as a result of which they exhibit the trait of “stubbornness.” They were banned in Denmark and Singapore after reports of fatal attacks.

1. American Bandogge
These muscular looking dogs have been using for fighting, even though they were not originally bred for this purpose. Since they are a cross breed between the American Pit Bull Terrier breed and the Neapolitan Mastiff breed, so they are prohibited in places where those two breeds are illegal.

Indeed, the reports of aggressiveness and attacks by these dog breeds cannot be denied. However, the fact remains whether it was the fault of the animals or their owners. Whatever the case, these were top 10 banned dog breeds.
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I have a cat of approximately 3 months and unfortunately it was attacked by a mature cat. It had a small wound in-between its hind limb. The wound has been eliminated however it now has a swelling around that part and as a result it is not able to walk properly, also it is not eating much. Please suggest me some way to get her well soon.

MD - Homeopathy, BHMS
Homeopath, Vadodara
I have a cat of approximately 3 months and unfortunately it was attacked by a mature cat. It had a small wound in-bet...
You may try giving her Homoeopathic medicine Arnica 200 1 dose every day. And dressing by calendula. And take good care of yourself that you may not get bitten or infected by any means from her.
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Hello Doctor, My pet name is Candy she is 2 years old, And she is doberman and lab cross. We would like to feed her different taste of foods. Till now we have t feed her any sweet or spicy. And tomorrow it her birthday we would like to serve her some sweet. Could you please advice us what kind of dish good for her . Kindly suggest us shall we feed her sugar free cakes.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Sugar and sweet is not advice for dogs you can feed him nice beef gravy or veg gravy meant to dog available in market . Also can feed him chew with non veg or veg as per u r requirement to him but no cakes and sweets please
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Processed food like royal canine, padegiry good for my dog? Also suggest some natural diet for my dog.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi, yes any processed food is good for your dog if fed as per the specifications of brand. For natural diet you can offer curd rice/ milk/ meat etc as per you and your dog choice.
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Holi - Spare the Pets!
Do not, under any circumstances, use colours or bhang on these helpless creatures as the consequences could be fatal. The presence of lead, which acts as an accumulative poison, makes Holi colours a high-risk material for dogs. Inhalation of the coloured powder may also cause nasal irritation and possibly respiratory allergy or infection. Most dogs get paranoid when you rub colours on them, since it very often gets into their eyes and nose, making them very uncomfortable. Dogs and us are not the same make, so this Holi, let?s keep the colors off the animals!
(Re-shared, from Speaking Tree.)
3 people found this helpful
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