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Dr. Harish S N

BVSc

Veterinarian, Bangalore

25 Years Experience
Dr. Harish S N BVSc Veterinarian, Bangalore
25 Years Experience
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I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
More about Dr. Harish S N
Dr. Harish S N is a trusted Veterinarian in HSR Layout, Bangalore. He has had many happy patients in his 25 years of journey as a Veterinarian. He is a qualified BVSc . He is currently associated with Dr Harish S N in HSR Layout, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Harish S N and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 30 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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BVSc - Bangalore University - 1992
Languages spoken
English

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Dr Harish S N

No.615 C/O Gn Reddy Pet Clinic Opposite Federal Bank & Near Bda Complex 14th Cross 15th Main Hsr Layout Sector 4 Bangalore - 560102Bangalore Get Directions
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M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
TIPS FOR YOUR PET IN HOT SUMMER

By following a few simple rules, it is easy to keep your pet safe while still having fun in the sun"
Take these simple precautions to help prevent your pet from overheating. And if you suspect your pet is suffering from heat stroke, get help from your veterinarian immediately.
1)Visit the Vet:
A visit to the veterinarian for a early summer check-up is a must. Make sure your pets get tested for parasitic infestation, if any. Ask your doctor to recommend a safe flea and tick control program.
2)Made in the Shade:
Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it's hot outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful to not over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it's extremely hot.
3)Know the Warning Signs:
Symptoms of overheating in pets include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. They can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees. Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.
4)No Parking:
Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle. On a hot day, a parked car can become a furnace in no time-even with the windows open-which could lead to fatal heat stroke.
5)Make a Safe Splash:
Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool-not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur, and try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains chlorine and other chemicals that could cause stomach upset.
6)Summer Style:
Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs' coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. And be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.
7)Street Smarts:
When the temperature is very high, don't let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close the ground, your pooch's body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. Keep walks during these times to a minimum.
8)Avoid Chemicals:
Commonly used flea and tick products, rodenticides (mouse and rat baits), and lawn and garden insecticides can be harmful to cats and dogs if ingested, so keep them out of reach. When walking your dog, steer clear of areas that you suspect have been sprayed with insecticides or other chemicals. Keep citronella candles, oil products and insect coils out of pets' reach as well. Call your veterinarian if you suspect your animal has ingested a poisonous substance.
9)Party Animals:
Taking Fido to a backyard barbeque or party? Remember that the food and drink offered to guests may be poisonous to pets. Keep alcoholic beverages away from pets, as they can cause intoxication, depression and comas. Similarly, remember that the snacks enjoyed by your human friends should not be a treat for your pet; any change of diet, even for one meal, may give your dog or cat severe digestive ailments. Avoid raisins, grapes, onions, chocolate and products with the sweetener xylitol.
10)Fireworks Aren't Very Pet-riotic:
Exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns or trauma to curious pets, and even unused fireworks can be hazardous. Many types of fireworks contain potentially toxic substances such as potassium nitrate, copper, chlorates, arsenic and other heavy metals.
11 people found this helpful

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
What Makes Chocolate Poisonous to Dogs?

Chocolate is made from cocoa, and cocoa beans contain caffeine and a related chemical compound called theobromine, which is the real danger.

The problem is that dogs metabolize theobromine much more slowly than humans, reported by Denver veterinarian Kevin Fitzgerald, PhD, tells WebMD.

“The buzz we get from eating chocolate may last 20 to 40 minutes, but for dogs it lasts many hours,” he says. “After 17 hours, half of the theobromine a dog has ingested is still in the system.”

Theobromine is also toxic to cats, but there are very few reported cases of theobromine poisoning in felines because they rarely eat chocolate.

Dogs, on the other hand, will eat just about anything.

Even small amounts of chocolate can cause vomiting and diarrhea in dogs. Truly toxic amounts can induce hyperactivity, tremors, high blood pressure, a rapid heart rate, seizures, respiratory failure, and cardiac arrest.
2 people found this helpful

I am having a female dog and it is 4 years old. It was having her menstrual cycle. Its been 22 days as of today and I don't think there is much bleeding. I am not sure of it tho. Today it ran out of the house and got mated with an another street male dog. Now is there a chance of possible pregnancy ? Is there any medicine apart from surgery to use as a contraceptive to drop the pregnancy ?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Nothing should be done till 35 days from today. On 35 th day meet a proper veterinarian, get an ultrasound done. If your dog is getting pregnant, there are safer medicines available, but should be started only after the the ultrasound examination confirms this.
1 person found this helpful
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I have one german shepherd dog. 4 years old. my dog health good. but last 4 month every 15 days get conversion. i give tablet gardenal 60 mg but not effect please give good salutation.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
First try to find out cause for epilepsy , by doing blood profile, x rays etc. If ur given gardenal 60 mg do blood gardenal level so according to that u can give proper dose
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I have an abandoned pigeon's new born baby. What do I feed him? How much to feed? And at what time intervals? And will it excrete by itself? Please help. Where can I get him rehabilitated?

BVSc
Veterinarian, Ghaziabad
You can feed half moisted crushed grains, four times a day. Better you can shift him to bird shelter kavi nagar Jain mandir Thanks.
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Hi doctor, I have a german shepherd of one and half year old. It is so agressive and barks a lot. We have received complaint from our neighbour regarding this. I just wanted to know is there any injection for dogs to reduce the aggressiveness and not to bark a lot. because I have heard there is a injection for dogs to become calm.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
It is a behavioural problem treat the dogs with extra love and affection train him to become calm and avoid undue entry of strangers whole time in dogs area and do not apply force to tackle the problem. Be more friendly and try to play with your dog avoid medication to solely treat this condition
4 people found this helpful
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Hello My dog is mixed breed of lab and street and is 8 years old this year. Could you please let me know the precautions I should take ? He sheds hair every two months as well. But Is very active and runs a lot.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
For hair do regular brushing once a day and start some nutricoat tonic for hair. As considering age do blood test regular once in year.
1 person found this helpful
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Sir I have3 year old gsd nd she got crossed with Street dog nd I don't want her to conceive but next day I had already arranged for a matting so now what should I do. After the drug injection should I go for matting option the very next day.

Veterinarian, Bhiwadi
If she has mated with stray dog than there is no point in going matin with other dog. Now only option is get treatment for mismating an waiting for next heat. Remember: the hormonal treatment for mismating can be associated with side effects.
1 person found this helpful
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Top 10 Banned Dog Breeds


Even though it seems outdated and unfair, breed-specific laws continue to exist across the globe in order to attempt to reduce the number of dangerous dogs. Enforcing these laws is extremely costly and difficult, but certain breeds of dogs continue to be outlawed because they are deemed “threatening.” Here are 10 dog breeds that are currently banned in the world.

10. Tosa Inu
Tosa Inus happen to be massive dogs with certain variations that have a weight anywhere between 130 pounds and 200 pounds. They bred to be fighting dogs right from the start and they are legally prohibited in several countries like Denmark, Malta and Norway, where they are regarded as dangerous.

9. Pit Bulls
Pit Bulls were originally bred to bait bears and bulls. Several studies have allegedly indicated that Pit Bulls are responsible for up to 45% human attacks by dogs, particularly children. Thus, Pit Bulls are restricted all over the world, especially in Miami and the UK.

8. Perro de Presa Canario
Perro de Presa Canarios are large dogs that were originally bred to work lifestock. Early obedience training and socialization is essential for these dogs, and yet they can be aggressive. After reports of killings, this dog breed was banned in Australia and New Zealand.

7. Neapolitan Mastiff
Even though Neapolitan Mastiffs are not associated with dangerous dogs, owning them is illegal in Singapore. A psychological evaluation has to be passed by a Neapolitan Mastiff in order to own one in Romania. Fully grown Neapolitan Mastiffs that weigh almost 200 pounds can be dangerous.

6. Fila Brasileiro
Also referred to as Brazillian Mastiffs, these large dogs were developed in Brazil. Their tracking abilities tend to be remarkable, but at the same time, their aggressiveness and strength tends to be quite terrible. Perhaps this is why Denmark, Israel, Malta, Norway and the UK banned this dog breed.

5. Dogo Argentino
These large and white muscular dogs were developed in Argentina mainly for big-game hunting, especially puma and wild boar. Although they were bred not be aggressive, they happen to be athletic and extremely strong. Thus, owning a Dogo in Australia, New Zealand, Portugal and the UK is illegal.

4. Czechoslovakian Wolfdog
The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is just one example of wolf hybrid breeds, many of which are illegal to keep as pets. There have been particular reports about attacks by wolfdog breeds, especially on children who are viewed as prey items, which is just one example that they possess wolf-like instincts.

3. Boerboel
Boerboels were originally bred to guard the homestead. There was a time when they were a first line of denfese against predators like hyenas, lions and other big cats. However, after being recognized as fighting dogs, this breed was banned in Denmark in 2010.

2. American Bulldog
American bulldogs are heavy muscular dogs. Despite being known for their friendly and pleasant demeanor, American Bulldogs tend to be extremely confident as a result of which they exhibit the trait of “stubbornness.” They were banned in Denmark and Singapore after reports of fatal attacks.

1. American Bandogge
These muscular looking dogs have been using for fighting, even though they were not originally bred for this purpose. Since they are a cross breed between the American Pit Bull Terrier breed and the Neapolitan Mastiff breed, so they are prohibited in places where those two breeds are illegal.

Indeed, the reports of aggressiveness and attacks by these dog breeds cannot be denied. However, the fact remains whether it was the fault of the animals or their owners. Whatever the case, these were top 10 banned dog breeds.
3 people found this helpful

I have a black rabbit and he's 2 years old, my question is how can I help him wid his loose motions.

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
Please provide lacto bacillus powder (sporolac sachets) in his diet. You can add it in water or can feed directly also. Don't give any oral antibiotics as these may aggravate the condition. Thank you.
3 people found this helpful
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8 Tips For Your Dog This Summer!

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad

1. Make sure your dog has unlimited access to fresh water all the time.

2. Make sure your dog has access to shade when outside.

3. Take walks during the cooler hours of the day. Avoid 5-7 pm evening as the steam emitting from the road can kill your pet with heat stroke!

4. When walking, try to stay off of hot surfaces (like coal tar roads) because it can burn your dog's paws.

5. If you feel it's hot outside, it's even hotter for your pet - make sure your pet has a means of cooling off.

6. Keep your dog free of external insects (fleas, ticks) - consult your veterinarian about the best product for your pet.

7. Consider clipping or shaving dogs with long coats (talk to your veterinarian first to see if it's appropriate for your pet).

8. If you have a short nose breed like pugs or bulldogs, keep a Turkish towel with you whenever traveling. Whenever you notice he/she is panting heavily, you can soak the towel in water and wrap it around his body to have a local cooling effect.

5 people found this helpful

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
If an unvaccinated or partially vaccinated pet dog or cat is bitten by a stray dog, wounds should be thoroughly washed with water and an antiseptic such as povidone iodine should be applied.

If the stray dog is suspected to be rabid, then the pet dog should be put to sleep (Euthanasia). But if the owner is not ready or the rabid status of the stray dog is not known, post?exposure vaccination of the pet with cell culture vaccine and simultaneous careful observation of the pet are recommended for up to 2 months (up to six months is desirable) for possible signs of rabies in the pet. During this period, if the dog becomes sick, the owner should take the dog to the veterinarian to get rabies ruled out at the first instance. It should be noted that post?exposure vaccination is not very successful in dogs. Simultaneously, pre?exposure vaccination of all household members is necessary.
11 people found this helpful

Hi doctors. My dog is 4 years labrador. There are some areas on his body where are few hairs left. With some redness. I am now using wokazole lotion. Please give some advice.

Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Wokazole is steroid combination it will subside the rashes for now but it can reappear. Next time get skin scraping done first.
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful

For my dog eyes are closing when she will sleep and getup why?Any medicine is there for that problem can you tell me.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Please check if there is any discharge from the eyes? Are the eyes red? Is the dog rubbing eyes with her paws sometimes? Please get her checked from a vet. If i' m getting you right, it could be spasms of the eyelids and may need some topical anti-inflammatory meds. Hope this is helpful.
1 person found this helpful

My pet 6 months old golden retriever in fed on golden retriever junior royal canin and the vet has suggested some human supplements like feroglobin and calicmax is it safe for him ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Yes its safe , even the human can have the tablets when its safe to the animals . So dont worry . I use nearly 95 % of medicine in human field only . And regarding dosage please consult your vet in supplementing it.
1 person found this helpful
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