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Dr. G.Lakshminarayanan

MBBS, MCh - Neuro Surgery

Neurosurgeon, Bangalore

33 Years Experience  ·  400 - 500 at clinic
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Dr. G.Lakshminarayanan MBBS, MCh - Neuro Surgery Neurosurgeon, Bangalore
33 Years Experience  ·  400 - 500 at clinic
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Personal Statement

To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies....more
To provide my patients with the highest quality healthcare, I'm dedicated to the newest advancements and keep up-to-date with the latest health care technologies.
More about Dr. G.Lakshminarayanan
Dr. G.Lakshminarayanan is a popular Neurosurgeon in Rajaji Nagar, Bangalore. He has had many happy patients in his 33 years of journey as a Neurosurgeon. He is a MBBS, MCh - Neuro Surgery . You can visit him at Pristine Hospital in Rajaji Nagar, Bangalore. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. G.Lakshminarayanan on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Neurosurgeons in India. You will find Neurosurgeons with more than 33 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Neurosurgeons online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
MBBS - Madras University, Chenai, India - 1985
MCh - Neuro Surgery - Madras University, Chenai, India - 1991
Professional Memberships
Karnataka Medical Council

Location

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Pristine Hospital

#877, 2nd Stage Extension, Dr. Modi Hospital Road, West Of Chord Road, Rajaji Nagar. Landmark: Near Shankar Mutt Bus stopBangalore Get Directions
500 at clinic
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Mallya Hospital

#1, Next to IPC Garden, Near Sanjaydat School, Vittal Mallya Road. Landmark : Opposite Kanteerava Indoor Stadium.Bangalore Get Directions
400 at clinic
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Pristine Hospital

#877, 2nd Stage Extension, Dr. Modi Hospital Road, West Of Chord Road, Rajaji Nagar. Landmark: Near Shankar Mutt Bus stop, BangaloreBangalore Get Directions
500 at clinic
...more
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Medicine for and the what kind of precaution we have to take for the brain tumor?

FRHS, Ph.D Neuro , MPT - Neurology Physiotherapy, D.Sp.Med, DPHM (Health Management ), BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai
Medicine for and the what kind of precaution we have to take for the brain tumor?
Balanced diet avoid stress anxiety and anticipating the things do regular physical activity and breathing exercises for about 30 minutes regularly best wishes.
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What are the symptoms of migraine and dengue and what precautions should b taken to avoid this and be safe.

MBBS
General Physician, Cuttack
Symptoms Of Dengue 1.Sudden High Fever,Severe Headache 2.Severe Bone and Joint Pain, Pain behind eyes 3.Fatigue, Nausea and vomiting 4.Skin rash may appear 2-5 days after fever 1.Take anti mosquito measures like use of mosquito net, mosquito repellent, 2. spraying of insecticides in surrounding, 3.wearing full sleeve shirts in the evening, 4.Discarding empty containers for collection of water and promoting mosquito breeding 5.Blood platelet count is low and Dengue Antigen test(NS1) is positive
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DM - Neurology, MD - General Medicine, fellowship in interventional neuroradiology
Neurologist, Mumbai
Time is brain in case of acute ischemic stroke. Sooner you rush to the hospital, sooner you get the treatment leading to salvage of brain tissue from becoming permanently dead. So dont waste time visiting a general practitioners clinic if you have such kind of symptoms as it may lead to delay in treatment.
3 people found this helpful

I am 36 years old lady suffering with numbness in legs and these days in hands also.

Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Kaithal
I am 36 years old lady suffering with numbness in legs and these days in hands also.
There are numerous conditions that can cause you to feel numbness and tingling. For example, an insect or animal bite, toxins found in seafood, a migraine headache, or radiation therapy can give you a feeling of pins and needles. An abnormal level of vitamin B-12, potassium, calcium or sodium is another potential cause. In some cases, feelings of numbness and tingling or burning can indicate a serious injury or medical condition. Seek urgent care if you just experienced a back, neck, or head injury or are unable to walk or move. Losing consciousness, even if only for a short time, is also a warning sign that you need medical attention.
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Migraine - 5 Homeopathic Remedies That Will Surely Help You!

BHMS, MHM (NIMS), MD - Homeopathy, PGDCCR(NIMS), Msc psychology
Homeopath, Hyderabad
Migraine - 5 Homeopathic Remedies That Will Surely Help You!

Migraines are characteristically throbbing, intrusive and sometimes, prolonged headache accompanied by sensitivity to sound and light and the feeling of nausea. They are fairly common and usually treatable with home remedies and allopathic drugs. The word migraine has been derived from another word ‘hemicranias’ which means one sided headache. Headaches resulting from migraines tend to occur in episodes rather than being regular. Additionally, the intensity of a migraine will also vary with some attacks being very severe while other attacks will be a lot more moderate.

The pain is often accompanied by nausea or vomiting. Homeopathy may play an efficient role in the treatment of migraines. Homeopathic medicines are prescribed based on the type, duration and intensity of the migraine attacks and are most often helpful in their treatment.

Homeopathy aims to cure the headache from its very root without attracting side effects. Some of the common homeopathic medicines include:

  1. Belladonna: This is one of the most common homeopathic drugs prescribed for migraines. This medicine aims to cure the throbbing character of the migraine in the temporal region, which is further induced by light and sound.
  2. Spigelia: This is useful to treat headaches arising from the left hemisphere of the brain that is fairly common among individuals experiencing migraines. Additionally, there would be an occurrence of severe pain in the eyeballs which might be worsened by excess movement of the eyes.
  3. Glonoinum: This medicine works fairly well with congestive headaches which are accompanied by a constant feeling of blood rushing to the head. You might also feel shocks in your head.
  4. Sanguinaria Canadensis: This is prescribed in case of headaches that form from the back of the skull and settle prominently in the right hemisphere of the skull. The eyes also tend to throb; another symptom that is remedied by the use of this medicine.
  5. Natrum Muriaticum: this is usually prescribed to women who complain of their migraines worsening during their menses. The headaches can be accompanied by temporary loss of vision.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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I am 31 year female. I have female type of baldness. Now I was going under treatment to recover my hairs (6 months). My doctor suggests me for prp. I had old history of epilepsy (20 years). I took medicine nearly 15 years. Last 5 years I was not taking any medicine. Is it good to go prp treatment?

MD - Homeopathy
Homeopath, Aurangabad
I am 31 year female. I have female type of baldness. Now I was going under treatment to recover my hairs (6 months). ...
Hello hair problem is common now a days due to stress and busy life take full sleep drink planty water have fruits take acid hydrofluoric 30 2 tds x 30 days and revert.
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My mother age 58 she's suffering with Parkinson disease movement disorder from last 4 years.

MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist, Pune
My mother age 58 she's suffering with Parkinson disease movement disorder from last 4 years.
Hi Adil, You need to provide more information about the concerns you have regarding your mother's condition.
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Slipped Disc - Things You Must Do To Prevent It!

BPTh/BPT, Fellowship in Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (FOR), MBA (Healthcare)
Physiotherapist, Bangalore
Slipped Disc - Things You Must Do To Prevent It!

A slipped disc is a condition which is characterized by a damaged disc in your spinal cord. The disc is a soft substance present in the spinal cord that cushions the vertebra in the spine. A slipped disc occurs when the soft substance in the disk pops out causing pain in the area.

There are various preventive measures that you can adopt to prevent a slipped disc from occurring; they are

  1. Keep a check on weight: Being overweight increases the risk of a slipped disc as the pressure on the lower back will be immense. In order to reduce the pressure, maintain optimal levels of bodyweight.
  2. Exercise regularly: Do strength training exercises such as the plank and squats to strengthen the core muscles. This helps in strengthening your lower back strong and prevents slipped disc from occurring.
  3. Maintain a good form while exercising or lifting anything heavy: If you are exercising or simply lifting something heavy, make sure to keep your lower back straight. Lifting heavy weights without proper form may lead to slipped disc as the spine may not be able to bear the stress.
  4. Quit smokingIt is advised to quit smoking as smoking impairs the ability of the disc to absorb nutrients and thus, prevents it from remaining healthy. It may also cause the discs to become brittle and dry.
  5. Maintain a good posture: Remember to keep an uptight posture while walking; keep the spine straight to prevent slouching. Maintain a proper neutral posture while sitting as well. Hunching over your desk while working with your computer may also cause problems in your spine.
  6. Do not sit for prolonged periods: Sitting for extended periods of time may cause problems in your lower back and posture. It may weaken the lower back muscles and lead to complications such as a slipped disc. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Physiotherapist.



 

5114 people found this helpful

Learning Disabilities and Dementia

MBBS, DPM (Psychiatry)
Psychiatrist, Thrissur
Learning Disabilities and Dementia

Learning disabilities and dementia


Advances in medical and social care have led to a significant increase in the life expectancy of peoplewith learning disabilities. The effect of ageing on people with learning disabilities – including therisk of developing dementia – has, therefore, become increasingly important. This information sheetoutlines some of the issues concerning people with a learning disability who develop dementia.

The causes of learning disability are diverse. They include genetic disorders such as Down’s syndrome, pre- or post-natal infections, brain injury, and general individual differences.

What is dementia?

Dementia is a general term used to describe a group of diseases that affect the brain. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. The damage caused by all types of dementia leads to a progressive loss of brain tissue. As brain tissue cannot be replaced, symptoms become worse over time.

Symptoms may include:
Loss of memory
An inability to concentrate
Difficulty in finding the right words or understanding what other people are saying
A poor sense of time and place
Difficulty in completing self-care and domestic tasks and solving minor problems
Mood changes
Behavioural changes
There is no evidence that dementia has a different effect on people with learning disabilities than it does on other people. However, the early stages are more likely to be missed or misinterpreted, particularly if several professionals are involved in the person’s care. The person may find it hard to express how they feel that their abilities have deteriorated, and problems with communication may make it more difficult for others to assess change.

What are the risks?
Down’s syndrome and Alzheimer’s diseaseAbout 20 per cent of people with a learning disability have Down’s syndrome. People with Down’s syndrome are at particular risk of developing dementia.
Figures from one study (Prasher, 1995) suggest that the following percentages of people with Down’s syndrome have dementia:
30-39 years - 2 per cent40-49 years - 9.4 per cent50-59 years - 36.1 per cent60-69 years - 54.5 per cent
Studies have also shown that virtually all people with Down’s syndrome develop the plaques and tangles in the brain associated with Alzheimer’s disease, although not all will develop the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. The reason for this has not been fully explained. However, research has shown that amyloid protein found in these plaques and tangles is linked to a gene on chromosome 21. People with Down’s syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21, which may explain their increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.
Other learning disabilities and dementiaThe prevalence of dementia in people with other forms of learning disability is also higher than in the general population. Some studies (Cooper, 1997; Lund, 1985; Moss and Patel, 1993) suggest that the following percentages of people with learning disabilities not due to Down’s syndrome have dementia:
50 years + - 13 per cent65 years + - 22 per cent
This is about four times higher than in the general population. At present, we do not know why this is the case. Further research is needed. People with learning disabilities are vulnerable to the same risk factors as anyone else. Genetic factors may be involved, or a particular type of brain damage associated with a learning disability may be implicated.
How can you tell if someone is developing dementia?Carers play an important part in helping to identify dementia by recognising changes in behaviour or personality. It is not possible to diagnose dementia definitely from a simple assessment. A diagnosis is made by excluding other possible causes and comparing a person’s performance over time. The process should include:
A detailed personal historyThis is vital to establish the nature of any changes that have taken place. It will almost certainly include a discussion with the main carer and any care service staff.
A full health assessmentIt is important to exclude any physical causes that could account for changes taking place. There are a number of other conditions that have similar symptoms to dementia but are treatable: for example, hypothyroidism and depression. It is important not to assume that a person has dementia simply because they fall into a high risk group. A review of medication, vision andhearing should also be included.
Psychological and mental state assessmentIt is equally important to exclude any other psychological or psychiatric causes of memory loss. Standard tests that measure cognitive ability are not generally applicable as people with learning disabilities already have cognitive impairment and the tests are not designed for people without verbal language skills. New tests are being developed for people with learning disabilities.
Special investigationsBrain scans are not essential in the diagnosis of dementia, although they can be useful in excluding other conditions or in aiding diagnosis when other ssessments have been inconclusive.
What can be done if it is dementia?Although dementia is a progressive condition, the person will be able to continue with many activities for some time. It is important that the person’s skills and abilities are maintained and supported for as long as possible, and that they are given the opportunity to fulfil their potential. However, the experience of failure can be frustrating and upsetting, so it is important to find a balance between encouraging independence and ensuring that the person’s self-esteem and dignity are not undermined.
At present there is no cure for dementia. People progress from mild to moderate to more severe dementia over a period of years. New drug treatments seek to slow down or delay the progression of the disease and it is hoped that treatments will become more effective in the future. See the Society’s information sheet Drug treatments for Alzheimer’s disease – Aricept, Exelon, Reminyl and Ebixa.
Strategies for supporting the person with dementia People who develop dementia are, first and foremost, human beings with individual personalities, life histories, likes and dislikes. Dementia affects a person’s ability to communicate, so they may develop alternative ways of expressing their feelings. By understanding something of a person’s past and personality we can begin to understand what they might be feeling and why they respond in the way they do.
Many practical strategies have been developed to support people with dementia and their carers. Here are some ideas:
Enable individuals to have as much control over their life as possible. Use prompts and reassurance during tasks they now find more difficult.
Help the person by using visual clues and planners to structure the day.
Use visual labels on doors to help people find their way around their home in the early stages.
Try to structure the day so that activities happen in the same order. Routines should be individual and allow for flexibility.
A ‘life story book’ comprising photos and mementos from the person’s past may be a useful way to help the person interact and reminisce.
If speech is a problem make use of body language. Simplify sentences and instructions, listen carefully and give plenty of time for the person to respond.
If someone is agitated, the environment might be too busy or noisy.
Relaxation techniques such as massage, aromatherapy and music can be effective and enjoyable.
If someone becomes aggressive, carers and professionals should work together to try to establish reasons for the person’s frustration and find ways of preventing the behaviour or coping with the situation should it arise.
Medication may be used if someone is experiencing high levels of agitation, psychotic symptoms or depression. It is important that any prescribed medicine is monitored closely and that other ways of dealing with the situation are thoroughly explored.

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