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Dr. Chandrashekhar

BVSc

Veterinarian, Bangalore

16 Years Experience
Dr. Chandrashekhar BVSc Veterinarian, Bangalore
16 Years Experience
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Chandrashekhar
Dr. Chandrashekhar is a renowned Veterinarian in NRR Hospitals, Bangalore. He has helped numerous patients in his 16 years of experience as a Veterinarian. He is a BVSc . You can consult Dr. Chandrashekhar at Nandi Veterinary Clinic in NRR Hospitals, Bangalore. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Chandrashekhar on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a nexus of the most experienced Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 38 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
BVSc - Krnataka Veterinarian College - 2001
Languages spoken
English

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Nandi Veterinary Clinic

6th Cross, 60 ft road,Below Relience Fresh ,MEI layout, BagalgunteBangalore Get Directions
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5 Tips To Maintain Your Dog’s Dental Health

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
5 Tips To Maintain Your Dog’s Dental Health
5 Tips to maintain your Dog’s Dental Health

It is fairly easy to keep your dog’s teeth and gums healthy provided that you regularly take care of your pet and go for frequent health check-ups. Moreover, conducting regular checks at your home will also go a long way in identifying a problem in its nascent stage.

Here are five tips to ensure that your dog’s dental health remains perfect.

1) Prevent tooth decay - If your dog frequently consumes plaque-forming food products, it can lead to subsequent build up on its teeth and ultimately lead to certain problems such as tooth loss, gingivitis and receding gums. Ensure that you clean your dog’s teeth on a daily basis in order to avoid any form of tooth decay.

2) Check your dog’s breath - Although dog breath is usually not pleasant; if your dog smells unusually foul, you should get a check-up done. Moreover, observe if this foul breath is coupled with other issues such as vomiting, excessive urinating or sudden loss of appetite.

3) Encourage your dog to play with chew toys - Chew toys assist in providing stronger teeth to your pet, while giving a perfect massage for its gums. In addition, continuous chomping helps remove soft tartar and thus keeps teeth clean. Nylon, rubber and rawhide chew toys are the safest for your dog.

4) Identify signs of oral disease - A number of oral diseases can be prevented or controlled if they are diagnosed at an early stage. Major symptoms of almost all oral diseases are loose teeth, swollen gums, foul breath, excessive drooling, tumours in the gums and cysts under the tongue.

5) Carefully examine your dog’s teeth and gums - Healthy gums of a dog are indicated by the fact that they are pink in colour and have no signs of swelling. As for the teeth, they should not have any traces of tartar. Carry out this teeth and gum examination each week by lifting your dog’s lips and observing carefully.

If you would like to consult with me privately, please click on 'Consult'.

From Lybrate: If you found this tip useful, please thank the doctor by clicking on the heart icon below. Also, spread good health by sharing this tip with your loved ones over WhatsApp, Facebook and other media.
2145 people found this helpful

I have a q regarding my dog's health. he is having vomiting since last 15 days. whatever he eats in next moment he throws out. I gave him digene 1 tbspun in a day as prescribed by his doc nd sporolac powder with food also. he is 2.5 years pomerenian. plz guide me what to do next to improve his health.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Please investigate. Vomiting may not a disease in itself, but a sign observed in many diseases. Vomiting (I'll call it as - Regurgitation) for 15 days shouldn't be taken lightly. To start with - you can get a chest and abdomen x ray done - to identify if there is any radio-opaque foreign body, and send blood sample to identify if there is any metabolic involvement. Hope this is helpful.

I was attacked by dog on 28/3/15, luckily there was no cut on my body. But I came to know there was small spit on my hand. As doctor diagnose me and advised me injection. Same day took vaxirab and second I took 2/4/15 and third I took on 7/4/15. I know the further step and how many more injection I have to take ?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dear sir, as far as the dog is a street dog you need to worry. In this case even thought the dog is a street dog it does not seems to be bitten case as you dint have any injury or cut wound. To get rabies you need to be: 1. Have a cut wound first then rabies dog saliva has to be in contact with the wound. 2. Have to watch the dog for 30 days. Because the rabies dog cannot survive more than 45 days. 3. Rabies is a viral diseases so it needs a proper contact with the infection wild rabid carnivores. (like hiv infection) 4. So in your cases what you have done is more than enough.
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I have a female labra of 1 year from her startng she is eatng cow dunk .I wnt to knw the reason nd how to cure it

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
She may need a properly balanced food! Deficiencies can predispose to such habits like pica. Check the diet please.

Dr I have two female lovebird and one male lovebird and one female lovebird is going inside and male lovebird is not giving female love bird to sit in the nest what to do ?reply fast dr.

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Hoshiarpur
What is the age of lovebirds and how you are able to distinguish between male and female lovebirds as it is quite difficult to find sex of lovebirds there may be sexing problem.
3 people found this helpful
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Mai bhopal se hu. and meri female dog hai. Jo Abhi 12 days ho gye hai use cross huye To kya use puppy na ho aisa koi injection hai ?Jisse use koi nukasan na ho. please advise.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
You can have tablets for it from the receptive days on wards . But it has all the side effects i would suggest you to go for one breeding and surgically remove the uterus . With a vet surgeon
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful

I have a rottweiler puppy about 70 days old got problem in his rear legs i.e lameness. As one Dr. Told me that he got ligament problem in his rear legs. He got this problem after about 50 days. Before that he was alright. Now could you please guide me what is best solution for this problem.

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc- Veterinary Surgery and Radiology
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hello, mostly dogs at this age are in fast growing stage and problem like this can either increase or get resolved. It depends on which region is affected so getting an x ray of back legs will help to find the extent of problem. Till that give some pain medication to dog n avoid slippery floor n commercial dog food.
1 person found this helpful
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I have bought a 35 days old labrador puppy, can you please tell me what to feed him, I fed him cerelac but now he is having loose motion, also tell how to cure it.

BVMS (Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine & Science)
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Loosies. Need to be treated urgently rush him to a vet. Food. Lactol milk powder starter. Dry puppy food. Brand. Natural and delicious.
1 person found this helpful
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Now a days my 4 months labrador is feeling weakness in his back legs and when he stood up he feel ache. Suggest remedy. His all vaccination is done and he eats everything.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Feeling weakness is indication abnormal bone growth in growing puppies. It better you should get him complete check from vet. Hip dysplasia is very common problem in labs.
4 people found this helpful
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If a dog get fractured in his back. He is in great pain, even painkillers are not working. How many chances he have for survive?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Press the bone of the toe of the back leg. If the dog reacts in pain then chances r their. If not then thr is no hope.
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BVSC
Veterinarian, Ballia
The skin of your dog is entirely different from ours. There is significant ph difference so their skin is more sensitive than ours. Their body secretes some essential oils which gets depleted once you start bathing them daily. It results in drying of skin leading to flakes formation of policy kit is.
Some tips to remember---
*bathe your pets once in 10 days.
*groom your pets daily.
*do not use dettol/phenolic compounds on their body. It can be allergic.
*don't allow ticks/fleas/mites to thrive on their body.
*for hairy breeds, go for a complete hair-cut in summers.
*for breeds with drooping ears, take special care about ear cleaning.
*never use human soaps & shampoos like dove/clinic plus on dogs body. It can cause allergic dermatitis.
2 people found this helpful

BVSc
Veterinarian,
Five Common Summer Hazards for Dogs

1. Dehydration
One of the best ways to keep your dog safe in the summer time is by providing lots of cool, clean, fresh water. Consider preparing low sodium chicken broth or yogurt ice cubes, and introducing canned dog foods (best when frozen in a Kong!) to increase the moisture content in your dog’s diet.

2. Burned Pads
Under the summer sun, asphalt on sidewalks and streets can heat to a temperature that can burn a dog’s paws. To avoid scorched paws, walk your dog very early in the morning or in the late evening when the streets have cooled off. If you must walk your dog during the day, dog booties can protect his feet. Always put your hand down on the asphalt for about thirty seconds – if you must pull your hand away because the street is too hot, it is too hot for your dog to walk on without hurting his paws. If you don’t want your hand on the street for thirty seconds, your dog probably does not want his paws on it for thirty or more minutes of walking.

3. Parasites
Summer is the season for fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes; pests which can present a minor discomfort to your dog at best and at worst may be life threatening or cause self-mutilating behaviors. Feeding your dog a high quality diet, without preservatives or chemicals will build his immune system, making him generally more resistant to parasite infestation. There are a wide variety of preventatives on the market, including chemical spot-on treatments, repellent shampoos, essential oils, and flea/tick collars; talk to your vet to see what she recommends for your dog. Cleaning your house frequently and keeping your dog well groomed will also reduce the risk of parasite infestation.

4. Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a serious risk to dog’s health – in worst case scenarios, it can be fatal. You can prevent heat stroke by restricting your pet’s exercise during the hottest hours of the day (early morning or late evening are the best times for exercise during the summer), by making sure he is well hydrated, providing cool places for him to relax, providing opportunities to swim, cooling mats, and by never leaving your dog unattended in the car during summer heat.

Many dogs die annually in hot cars. Even if your windows are cracked or you park in the shade, heat can build quickly in a car in the summer, turning it into an oven. If it’s 95 degrees at noon and you leave your windows cracked, the temperature in your car may still rise as high as 113 degrees. This is a recipe for disaster for your dog. If you must leave your dog in the car for any period of time, the air conditioning should stay on. Leaving a dog to die in a hot car is not just a health risk for your dog, but may be cause for animal cruelty charges in some area. The solution? Don’t leave your dog in a hot car.

5. Leptospirosis
Leptospirosis is contracted through bodily fluids or tissue and can be transmitted through direct (as in the case of a bite or ingestion of flesh) or indirect contact (through water sources, food, etc.) with an infected animal. Stagnant waters are a common source of leptospirosis bacteria. Lepto can cause permanent health problems or death if not treated quickly. Symptoms include fever, vomiting, trembling/shaking, lethargy, anorexia, tenderness of joints and muscles, and increased water intake. If you suspect your dog has lepto, get him to a vet right away, an emergency vet if need be.

There are vaccines for lepto but they do not prevent all strains and can cause significant adverse reactions. Talk to your vet about weighing the risk of infection with the risks associated with the lepto vaccine.
3 people found this helpful

My dog is street dog and aged 11years. He keeps biting himself now and have become lazy. Is this coz of age or some other reason.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Rule out ticks in the body either now or before a month . If so then treat for the dog as its having tick allergic dermatitis with your vet.
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My dog sleeps outside and mosquitoes bite him, should I get him anything to prevent dog heartworm disease? what should I give him?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
It depends on which part of india you reside in. We do not get heart worms in india, except a few anecdotal reports from northeastern parts. There are monthly oral or topicals recommended, but again availability in india is doubtful since the infection isn' t endemic here. Hope this is helpful.
2 people found this helpful

Please Suggest something for my 2.5 months old german shepherd for a shiny coat. Its coat is dull and rough although I brush it regularly and feed him non veg and roti with curd. Please. Suggest some home made food not pedigree or market items if possible.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Please give him fish oil and also possible food of hills science plan large breed puppy food all the time as per the standards. With dog food you cant acheive these things as they require 20 times more protien than human as the growth rate of dog is higer they attain weight of 30-40 kg in just 12 months were as human it takes more years normally (diet contains what we need) and 10 times more fat and 15 times vitamins and omega fatty acids for hairy breeds. Its then upto you to change you r mind set in feeding your pet.
5 people found this helpful
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My labrador puppy is 0.8kg at the age of 6 weeks. In what amount I should feed him to make him healthier? Please help.

M. V SC & A.H. (Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Delhi
See normal diet as must hv been advised to you by your vet. One thing you should remember as a thumb rule for all pets whtever food you give, make it a point that pet runs atleast 1-2 kms each day which is its normal need. If you donot provide the pet this opportunity, it will develop lethargy, become obese and will get risk of suffering from metabolic disease like human. Then your purpose of keeping a pet will b defeated.
2 people found this helpful
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I have 6 months female black labrador how much quantity of food should I give her when I feed her?

MVSc
Veterinarian, Darjeeling
Well, 175 gm to 225 gm of balanced feed twice a day will be the right amount. That means upto 450 gm of feed per day.
2 people found this helpful
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My female Lab is 13 years old and has not been mated. Every year in the month of February she lactates and milk flows out of her rear tw breasts which she keeps sucking and self feeds. What is the remedy for this as due to her sucking the breasts have enlarged.Please advise.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
This is not an uncommon condition in dogs. This is a condition of false pregnancy seen just after the estrous or mating period in dogs. Lactation or oozing of milk occurs in this period and it increases with stimulation. So try to put collar around her neck to prevent her from licking. Take the dog for walk during this time or engage her with some other activity to distract her attention form licking. The milk secretion will gradually reduce and the breast size also reduces. If the secretion is more You can try Lasix 20 mg tablet once in day for 2-3 days and observe the dog. The dog will come to normal as the milk secretion come down.
1 person found this helpful
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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Why spay or neuter?
Every year, millions of unwanted dogs and cats, including puppies and kittens, are ORPHANED, END UP BECOMING MALNOURISHED, ROAM ON STREETS AND ARE PRONE TO ACCIDENTAL DEATHS. The good news is that RESPONSIBLE PET OWNERS can make a difference. By having your dog or cat sterilized, you will do your part to prevent the birth of unwanted puppies and kittens. Spaying and neutering prevent unwanted litters and may reduce many of the behavioural problems associated with the mating instinct.
Spaying eliminates heat cycles and generally reduces the unwanted behaviours that may lead to owner frustration. Neutering male dogs and cats reduces the breeding instinct and can have a calming effect, making them less inclined to roam and more content to stay at home.
Early spaying of female dogs and cats can help PROTECT THEM FROM some serious health problems later in life such as UTERINE INFECTIONS AND BREAST CANCER. Neutering your male pet can also lessen its risk of developing BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA (ENLARGED PROSTATE GLAND) AND TESTICULAR CANCER.
The procedure has NO EFFECT ON A PET'S INTELLIGENCE OR ABILITY TO LEARN, PLAY, WORK OR HUNT. Most pets tend to be better behaved following surgical removal of their ovaries or testes, making them more desirable companions.

When to spay or neuter:
Talk to us about the most appropriate time to spay or neuter your pet based upon its breed, age and physical condition. Keep in mind that, contrary to popular belief, it may NOT be best to wait until your female dog or cat has gone through its first heat cycle.

Side effects of spaying/neutering:
The common myth is that pets put on weight after neutering, which up to an extent is true. Neutering reduces the BMR – Basal Metabolic Rate of the pets. However, as long as the diet and exercise if kept proper – pets DO NOT put on exorbitant weight. Urinary incontinence is another side effect observed in older females sterilized in older age. However, the side effects certainly do not weigh more than the benefits of spaying or neutering.
Discuss about this in detail with us, on your next visit. BE A RESPONSIBLE PET PARENT – NEUTER/SPAY YOUR PETS!!!
3 people found this helpful
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