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Dr. C.v. Venugopal

Veterinarian, Bangalore

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Dr. C.v. Venugopal Veterinarian, Bangalore
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I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care....more
I believe in health care that is based on a personal commitment to meet patient needs with compassion and care.
More about Dr. C.v. Venugopal
Dr. C.v. Venugopal is a trusted Veterinarian in Victoria Layout, Bangalore. He is currently associated with Veterinary Hospital Shoolay in Victoria Layout, Bangalore. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. C.v. Venugopal on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 33 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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5 Essential Commands You Can Teach Your Dog!

MVSc
Veterinarian,

1. Sit
This is one of the easiest dog obedience commands to teach, so it’s a good one to start with.

  • Hold a treat close to your dog’s nose.
  • Move your hand up, allowing his head to follow the treat and causing his bottom to lower.
  • Once he’s in sitting position, say “Sit,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat this sequence a few times every day until your dog has it mastered. Then ask your dog to sit before mealtime, when leaving for walks, and during other situations where you’d like him calm and seated.

2. Come
This command can help keep a dog out of trouble, bringing him back to you if you lose grip on the leash or accidentally leave the front door open.

  • Put a leash and collar on your dog.
  • Go down to his level and say, “Come,” while gently pulling on the leash.
  • When he gets to you, reward him with affection and a treat.

Once he’s mastered it with the leash, remove it — and practice the command in a safe, enclosed area.

3. Down
This can be one of the more difficult commands in dog obedience training. Why? Because the position is a submissive posture. You can help by keeping training positive and relaxed, particularly with fearful or anxious dogs.

  • Find a particularly good smelling treat, and hold it in your closed fist.
  • Hold your hand up to your dog’s snout. When he sniffs it, move your hand to the floor, so he follows.
  • Then slide your hand along the ground in front of him to encourage his body to follow his head.
  • Once he’s in the down position, say “Down,” give him the treat, and share affection.

Repeat it every day. If your dog tries to sit up or lunges toward your hand, say “No” and take your hand away. Don’t push him into a down position, and encourage every step your dog takes toward the right position. After all, he’s working hard to figure it out!

4. Stay
Before attempting this one, make sure your dog is an expert at the “Sit” command.

  • First, ask your dog to “Sit.”
  • Then open the palm of your hand in front of you, and say “Stay.”
  • Take a few steps back. Reward him with a treat and affection if he stays.
  • Gradually increase the number of steps you take before giving the treat.
  • Always reward your pup for staying put — even if it’s just for a few seconds.

This is an exercise in self-control for your dog, so don’t be discouraged if it takes a while to master, particularly for puppies and high-energy dogs. After all, they want to be on the move and not just sitting there waiting.

5. Leave it
This can help keep your dog safe when his curiosity gets the better of him, like if he smells something intriguing but possibly dangerous on the ground! The goal is to teach your pup that he gets something even better for ignoring the other item.

  • Place a treat in both hands.
  • Show him one enclosed fist with the treat inside, and say, “Leave it.”
  • Let him lick, sniff, mouth, paw, and bark to try to get it — and ignore the behaviors.
  • Once he stops trying, give him the treat from the other hand.
  • Repeat until your dog moves away from that first fist when you say, “Leave it.”
  • Next, only give your dog the treat when he moves away from that first fist and also looks up at you.

Once your dog consistently moves away from the first treat and gives you eye contact when you say the command, you’re ready to take it up a notch. For this, use two different treats — one that’s just all right and one that’s a particularly good smelling and tasty favorite for your pup.

  • Say “Leave it,” place the less attractive treat on the floor, and cover it with your hand.
  • Wait until your dog ignores that treat and looks at you. Then remove that treat from the floor, give him the better treat and share affection immediately.
  • Once he’s got it, place the less tasty treat on the floor… but don’t completely cover it with your hand. Instead hold it a little bit above the treat. Over time, gradually move your hand farther and farther away until your hand is about 6 inches above.
  • Now he’s ready to practice with you standing up! Follow the same steps, but if he tries to snatch the less tasty treat, cover it with your foot.

Don’t rush the process. Remember, you’re asking a lot of your dog. If you take it up a notch and he’s really struggling, go back to the previous stage.

Just these five simple commands can help keep your dog safer and improve your communication with him. It’s well worth the investment of your time and effort. Remember, the process takes time, so only start a dog obedience training session if you’re in the right mindset to practice calm-assertive energy and patience.

1 person found this helpful

Hello My Rabbit died yesterday for no Reason, He was OK till evening but suddenly at 6'o clock he couldn't stand he tried and failed I took him to vet doc, But my rabbit died in Vet Clinic before Checking He Tried to stand too hard and Breathing by month but He couldn't stand for a minute and in two hours he died Please I want to know Why he died?

B.V.Sc. & A.H., M.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Gurgaon
Hello My Rabbit died yesterday for no Reason, He was OK till evening but suddenly at 6'o clock he couldn't stand he t...
The best way to know the reason in such cases to request vet to conduct posts mortum. As such symptoms can arise in multiple situation i. E. By making out which organs are affect vet can have rough idea about cause of death.
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My fish having small white dot on their body (ick) and one of my fish eye is getting cloudy day by day and they are dying one by one. And I added methylene blue in water to prevent ich. Please suggest me some medicine for them.

master of veterinary science
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Go for malachite green or antifungal branded imported medicine available online Please check amazon.
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Now a days my 4 months labrador is feeling weakness in his back legs and when he stood up he feel ache. Suggest remedy. His all vaccination is done and he eats everything.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Feeling weakness is indication abnormal bone growth in growing puppies. It better you should get him complete check from vet. Hip dysplasia is very common problem in labs.
4 people found this helpful
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I have a pet female dachshund never mated. Now she has developed tumor around her nipples. Is surgery only option? The tumor is hard on feeling.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
Surgery is one of the best option for mammary tumor, but you can try chemotherapy although success rate is limited.
2 people found this helpful
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What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

B.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Ballia
What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

Bleeding pets often suffer blood loss as a result of trauma. If bleeding is severe or continuous, the animal may lose enough blood to cause shock (loss of as little as 2 teaspoons per pound of body weight may cause shock). Emergencies may arise that require the owner to control the bleeding, even if it is just during transport of the animal to the veterinary facility. Pet owners should know how to stop hemorrhage (bleeding) if their pet is injured.

 Techniques to stop external bleeding:-

 The following techniques are listed in order of preference. 

1) Direct pressure:--gently press a compress (a pad of clean cloth or gauze) over the bleeding absorbing the blood and allowing it to clot. Do not disturb blood clots after they have formed. If blood soaks through, do not remove the pad; simply add additional layers of cloth and continue the direct pressure more evenly. The compress can be bound in place using bandage material which frees the hands of the first provider for other emergency actions. In the absence of a compress, a bare hand or finger can be used. Direct pressure on a wound is the most preferable way to stop bleeding.

2) Elevation:--if there is a severely bleeding wound on the foot or leg, gently elevate the leg so that the wound is above the level of the heart. Elevation uses the force of gravity to help reduce blood pressure in the injured area, slowing the bleeding. Elevation is most effective in larger animals with longer limbs where greater distances from wound to heart are possible. Direct pressure with compresses should also be maintained to maximize the use of elevation. Elevation of a limb combined with direct pressure is an effective way to stop bleeding. 

3) Pressure on the supplying artery:-- if external bleeding continues following the use of direct pressure and elevation, finger or thumb pressure over the main artery to the wound is needed. Apply pressure to the femoral artery in the groin for severe bleeding of a rear leg; to the brachial artery in the inside part of the upper front leg for bleeding of a front leg; or to the caudal artery at the base of the tail if the wound is on the tail. Continue application of direct pressure.

4) Pressure above and below the bleeding wound:-- this can also be used in conjunction with direct pressure. Pressure above the wound will help control arterial bleeding. Pressure below the wound will help control bleeding from veins.

5) Tourniquet:--use of a tourniquet is dangerous and it should be used only for a severe, life-threatening hemorrhage in a limb (leg or tail) not expected to be saved. A wide (2-inch or more) piece of cloth should be used to wrap around the limb twice and tied into a knot. A short stick or similar object is then tied into the knot as well. Twist the stick to tighten the tourniquet until the bleeding stops. Secure the stick in place with another piece of cloth and make a written note of the time it was applied. Loosen the tourniquet for 15 to 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Remember this is dangerous and will likely result in disability or amputation. Use of a tourniquet should only be employed as a last-resort, life-saving measure!

6) Internal bleeding:--internal bleeding is a life-threatening condition, but it is not obvious like external bleeding. Any bleeding which is visible is external. 
Internal bleeding occurs inside the body and will not be seen. There are, however, external signs of internal bleeding: 
• the pet is pale (check the gums or eyelids).
• the pet is cool on the legs, ears, or tail. 
• the pet is extremely excited or unusually subdued. If any of these signs are evident, the pet should be immediately transported to a veterinary facility for professional help. Remember: internal bleeding is not visible on the outside.

My pup is 4 months old and is not able to walk through his hind limbs since last 20 days, visited a doctor and he suggested only calcium and multi vitamins but no improvement observed. Conditions are worsen now his all limbs are not taking bow shape, please help.

B.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Varanasi
My pup is 4 months old and is not able to walk through his hind limbs since last 20 days, visited a doctor and he sug...
It is rickets. Get weekly shots of vtamin d3 along with calcium and phosphorus injections biweekly. Physiotherapy also needed simultaneously.
1 person found this helpful
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My 2 month old dog is puking from last night. We have him zafron on a vet advice. But it don't stop, also I see that due to some tik powder it sheds his hair very badly. Kindly suggest.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Young puppy are prone to infectious diseases so please take to a near by vet and consult as puking is a sign of parvo viral infection when cominbined with diahorea.
8 people found this helpful
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My dog aged 4 years suffers from bad breath. I have tried brushing his teeth, which he does not like and is such a waste of time and energy. What should I do?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
I' m sure he must be enjoying taste of toothpaste too! please speak to your vet a schedule a dental cleaning/scaling appointment. Rule out other causes of bad breath such as - improper bowel movements, excess worm load etc.
1 person found this helpful
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