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Dr. B Gowda

BVSc., MVSC - Surgery/Radiology

Veterinarian, Bangalore

20 Years Experience  ·  0 - 150 at clinic
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Dr. B Gowda BVSc., MVSC - Surgery/Radiology Veterinarian, Bangalore
20 Years Experience  ·  0 - 150 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care....more
I'm a caring, skilled professional, dedicated to simplifying what is often a very complicated and confusing area of health care.
More about Dr. B Gowda
Dr. B Gowda is one of the best Veterinarians in Yelahanka, Bangalore. He has been a practicing Veterinarian for 20 years. He is a BVSc., MVSC - Surgery/Radiology . You can meet Dr. B Gowda personally at Sudeeksha Pet Clinic in Yelahanka, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. B Gowda and consult privately on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Veterinarians in India. You will find Veterinarians with more than 30 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Education
BVSc. - BANGALORE VETERINARY COLLEGE - 1997
MVSC - Surgery/Radiology - BANGALORE VETERINARY COLLEGE - 1999

Location

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Sudeeksha Pet Clinic

# 723/707, C.H.S. 1st Main, 4th Phase, Yelahanka New Town. Landmark: Opp. To All India RadioBangalore Get Directions
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Sudeeksha Pet Clinic

# 723/707, C.H.S. 1st Main, 4th Phase, Yelahanka New Town. Landmark: Opp. To All India Radio, BangaloreBangalore Get Directions
150 at clinic
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Cupa Animal care Hospital

#4, New Devegowda Road, 1st Main, Thimmaiah Garden, R T NagarBangalore Get Directions
0 at clinic
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Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I have this puppy with me from last 10-12 days. I adopted him. He's active and eats regularly. Pedigree twice or thrice a day and rest home food like chapati ,rice, biscuits,breads etc. He got 2 months old today, he's stomach is showing growth, but his neck and face are still the same they were on the day I brought him.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Mumbai
Get him checked by local vet the dog might need dewrming since you hv adopted him have a complete blood checked up so ytou vet can give you proper guidence on food and healthcare.
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Hiii, is egg good for German Shepherd and my dog was not taking food properly even royal canine adult german shepherd food. Please suggest me best feed for it. Thank you.

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
Hi, egg is ok. You can also try other brand diet like pedigree / N & D/ Hills available in your local market. Go for regular deworming to make it heathy.
1 person found this helpful
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I am having a family of rabbits which consist 5 members and each of them having same problem. On there nose and ears they are having disease which looks ugly after then the hairs are also falling. So please give some tips to remove that disease.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
It seems skin infection to your rabbit. First of all separate the health puppies. You should clip the hair from infected area. Then you should use antiseptic ointment or lotion on that area. Like cipladine.
5 people found this helpful
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My dog is 3 mnths, while jumping he broke one of his tooth. Since then he is uneasy, biting evrything. Pls suggest. What should we do to make him easy? thanks.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Well, he's uneasy because he's getting new set of teeth. Called as teething. The tooth he broke was milk tooth/deciduous tooth and should be replaced by permanent one soon. Make sure you offer him balanced food. Non edible toys, bigger than size of his head can be given to chew upon.
4 people found this helpful

My dog aged 12+ breed Shiba Inu is suffering from wound on back feet & testicle.We apply Neomycin+polymyxin B Sulphate+basitratin Zinc Powder.Please guide us what should we do ?

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
This is case of Scrotal dermatitis case. Even after applying ointment u should consult ur vet for oral medications.
1 person found this helpful
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Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Dogs have to be taught to walk nicely on leash. They’re not born knowing that they shouldn’t pull ahead or lag behind. Teaching leash manners can be challenging because dogs move faster than us and are excited about exploring outdoors. Leashes constrain their natural behaviors and movements. Some dogs are determined to run around as fast as they possibly can. Other dogs want to stop, sniff and urinate on anything and everything in their paths. To teach your dog to walk without pulling, it’s critical that you never allow him to pull. If you’re inconsistent, your dog will continue to try pulling because sometimes it pays off.

How to Teach Your Dog to Walk Nicely on a Leash

You’ve probably seen dogs at shows or on TV who prance alongside their handlers, staring up with rapt attention. These dogs have received extensive training in precision heeling. It’s impressive but demanding work. Precision heeling demands constant attention from both dog and handler and is not appropriate for long periods of time, like for your daily walks around the block or to the park. Even dogs trained to heel need to learn to walk on leash without pulling when they’re not formally heeling.

You can use various methods to teach dogs to walk without pulling on leash. No single method works for all dogs. Here are some overall guidelines before we look at several methods:

Until your dog learns to walk without pulling, consider all walks training sessions. Keep training sessions frequent, short and fun for your dog.
Since loose-leash training sessions will be too short and slow to provide adequate exercise, find other ways to exercise your dog until he’s mastered loose-leash walking. In fact, you’ll succeed more quickly if you find a way to tire your dog out before taking him on a training walk. Dogs pull, in part, because they’re full of excess energy. So unless you can expend that energy, your dog will find it hard to control himself. Before you train, play fetch in a hallway or your backyard, play a vigorous game of tug, or drive your dog to the park so that he can play with his buddies.
Teaching a dog to walk without pulling requires plenty of rewards. Use highly desirable treats that your dog doesn’t get at other times. Soft treats are best so your dog can eat them quickly and continue training. Most dogs love wieners, cheese, cooked chicken or ham, small jerky treats or freeze-dried liver. Chop all treats into small peanut-sized cubes.
Walk at a quick pace. If your dog trots or runs, she’ll have fewer opportunities to catch a whiff of something enticing, and she’ll be less inclined to stop and eliminate every few steps. Additionally, you are far more interesting to your dog when you move quickly.
If you expect your dog to control herself while walking on leash, you must also expect her to control herself before you go for a walk. If she gets wildly excited as you prepare for a walk, you need to focus on that first. Walk to the door and pick up the leash. If your dog races around, barks, whines, spins or jumps up, just stand completely still. Do and say absolutely nothing until your dog calms down a bit. As soon as she has all four paws on the floor, slowly reach toward her to clip on the leash. If she starts to bounce around or jump up on you, quickly bring your hands (and the leash) back toward your body. Wait until your dog has all four paws on the floor again. Then slowly reach toward her again to attach her leash. Repeat this sequence until your dog can stand in front of you, without jumping up or running around, while you clip on her leash. This may seem like a tedious exercise at first, but if you’re consistent, your hard work will pay off. Eventually, your dog will learn to stand still while you attach her leash.

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
TAKING CARE OF PETS

Dog hygiene
Risk of transmission from contact with dogs is low and may be further reduced by simple precautions.
Dogs should be seen by a veterinarian on a regular basis.
Dogs should be treated promptly for diarrhea.
Dogs should be vaccinated for rabies.
Dogs should be treated to prevent heartworm disease (Dirofilaria immitis).
Effective flea control requires treatment of affected dogs, their environment, and other animals they contact.
Dogs should be fed high quality commercial food.
Dogs should not eat raw meat or eggs. Raw meat may have higher rates of Campylobacter and Salmonella in their stools
Dogs should not be allowed to eat garbage, feces, or hunt.
Dogs should not be allowed to drink non-potable water (e.G, surface water or toilet water).
Dogs should be inspected for ticks regularly.
Dog owners should wash their hands following contact with or cleaning up dog feces.
Groups at high risk for serious infection from pets include: Persons with waning immunity (e.G, older adults); children less than five years old; pregnant women and immunocompromised patients with AIDS, those without a functioning spleen or taking immunosuppressive therapy
To avoid infections, people at higher risk should take particular precautions with any animal contact.
They should do thorough and frequent hand wash
They should avoid contact with animals and their environment (e.G, pens, bedding and manure).
HIV positive patients should carry following precautions
When obtaining a new pet, they should avoid animals aged 6 months (or 1 year for cats)
They should be cautious when obtaining a pet from pet-breeding facilities, pet stores, and animal shelters, because of highly variable hygienic and sanitary conditions.
They should avoid stray animals.
They should avoid contact with any animal that has diarrhea.
They should seek veterinary care for animals with diarrheal illness, and a fecal sample from such animals should be examined for Cryptosporidium, Salmonella and Campylobacter.
They should wash their hands after handling pets, including before eating, and should avoid contact with pets' feces.
They should avoid contact with reptiles (e.G, snakes, lizards, iguanas, and turtles) as well as chicks and ducklings because of the risk for salmonellosis.
They should wear gloves during aquarium cleaning to reduce the risk for infection with Mycobacterium marinum.
They should avoid contact with exotic pets (e.G, nonhuman primates).
3 people found this helpful

Sir, We have a rescued Pointerdor female dog. She is a lovely dog but very very nervous the moment she steps out of the house. Please help.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Nothing to worry, if her feeding habits and other things are normal, play lot like a kid for few weeks.
1 person found this helpful
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My dog is alsation dog.He is 7 years old n he is very active dog.He is suffering from back leg weaknes.Suggest me good medicine for that.

M.V.Sc (Surgery)
Veterinarian, Mohali
GSD has arthiritis problem after certain age and ur dog seem to have same. You should start giving his joint supplement like glycoflex
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brushing your dog and oral hygiene

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Did you know that regularly brushing your dog's teeth and providing her with a healthy diet and plenty of chew toys can go a long way toward keeping her mouth healthy? Many pooches show signs of gum disease by the time they're four years old because they aren't provided with proper mouth care—and bad breath is often the first sign of a problem. Give your dog regular home checks and follow the tips below, and you'll have a very contented pooch with a dazzling smile.

1. The Breath Test

Sniff your dog's breath. Not a field of lilies? That's okay—normal doggie-breath isn't particularly fresh-smelling. However, if his breath is especially offensive and is accompanied by a loss of appetite, vomiting or excessive drinking or urinating, it's a good idea to take your pooch to the vet.

2. Lip Service

Once a week, with your dog facing you, lift his lips and examine his gums and teeth. The gums should be pink, not white or red, and should show no signs of swelling. His teeth should be clean, without any brownish tartar.

3. Signs of Oral Disease

The following are signs that your dog may have a problem in his mouth or gastrointestinal system and should be checked by a veterinarian:

Bad breath
Excessive drooling
Inflamed gums
Tumors in the gums
Cysts under the tongue
Loose teeth
4. The Lowdown on Tooth Decay

Bacteria and plaque-forming foods can cause build-up on a dog's teeth. This can harden into tartar, possibly causing gingivitis, receding gums and tooth loss. One solution? Regular teeth cleanings, of course.

5. Canine Tooth-Brushing Kit

Get yourself a toothbrush made especially for canines or a clean piece of soft gauze to wrap around your finger. Ask your vet for a toothpaste made especially for canines or make a paste out of baking soda and water. Never use fluoride with dogs under six months of age—it can interfere with their enamel formation. And please do not use human toothpaste, which can irritate a dog's stomach. Special mouthwash for dogs is also available—ask your vet.

6. Brightening the Pearly Whites

Taking these steps will make brushing a lot easier for the both of you:

First get your dog used to the idea of having her teeth brushed. Massage her lips with your finger in a circular motion for 30 to 60 seconds once or twice a day for a few weeks. Then move on to her teeth and gums.
When your pooch seems comfortable being touched this way, put a little bit of dog-formulated toothpaste or a paste of baking soda and water on her lips to get her used to the taste.
Next, introduce a toothbrush designed especially for dogs—it should be smaller than a human toothbrush and have softer bristles. Toothbrushes that you can wear over your finger (or a clean piece of gauze) are also available and allow you to give a nice massage to your dog's gums.
Finally, apply the toothpaste to her teeth for a gentle brushing, as in step 7.
A veterinary exam beforehand may be helpful to find out if your dog's gums are inflamed. If your dog has mild gingivitis, brushing too hard can hurt her gums.
7. Brushing Technique

Yes, there is actually a technique! Place the brush or your gauze-wrapped finger at a 45-degree angle to the teeth and clean in small, circular motions. Work on one area of your dog's mouth at a time, lifting her lip as necessary. The side of the tooth that touches the cheek usually has the most tartar, and giving a final downward stroke can help to remove it. If your dog resists having the inner surfaces of her teeth cleaned, don't fight it—only a small amount of tartar accumulates there. Once you get the technique down, go for a brushing two or three times a week.

8. Know Your Mouth Disorders

Getting familiar with the possible mouth problems your dog may encounter will help you determine when it's time to see a vet about treatment:

Periodontal disease is a painful infection between the tooth and the gum that can result in tooth loss and spread infection to the rest of the body. Signs are loose teeth, bad breath, tooth pain, sneezing and nasal discharge.
Gingivitis is an inflammation of the gums caused mainly by accumulation of plaque, tartar and disease-producing bacteria above and below the gum line. Signs include bleeding, red, swollen gums and bad breath. It is reversible with regular teeth cleanings.
Halitosis—or bad breath—can be the first sign of a mouth problem and is caused by bacteria growing from food particles caught between the teeth or by gum infection. Regular tooth-brushings are a great solution.
Swollen gums develop when tartar builds up and food gets stuck between the teeth. Regularly brushing your dog's teeth at home and getting annual cleanings at the vet can prevent tartar and gingivitis.
Proliferating gum disease occurs when the gum grows over the teeth and must be treated to avoid gum infection. An inherited condition common to boxers and bull terriers, it can be treated with antibiotics.
Mouth tumors appear as lumps in the gums. Some are malignant and must be surgically removed.
Salivary cysts look like large, fluid-filled blisters under the tongue, but can also develop near the corners of the jaw. They require drainage, and the damaged saliva gland must be removed.
Canine distemper teeth can occur if a dog had distemper as a puppy. Adult teeth can appear looking eroded and can often decay. As damage is permanent, decayed teeth should be removed by a vet.
9. Chew on This

chew toys can satisfy your dog's natural desire to chomp, while making his teeth strong. Gnawing on a chew toy can also help massage his gums and help keep his teeth clean by scraping away soft tartar. Ask your vet to recommend toxin-free rawhide, nylon and rubber chew toys.

P.S.: Gnawing also reduces your dog's overall stress level, prevents boredom and gives him an appropriate outlet for his natural need to chew.

10. Diet for Healthy Teeth

Ask your vet about a specially formulated dry food that can slow down the formation of plaque and tartar. Also, avoid feeding your dog table scraps, instead giving him treats that are specially formulated to keep canine teeth healthy.
14 people found this helpful

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
Your dog?s health is a key to a long and happy companionship. To keep it healthy in long run, it is important to know how your pet?s body work ? in health and disease! Being aware of certain basics helps you to prevent many problems, and pick up the major problems early in its course. In order to react quickly and help your pet?s ailments in timely manner you must be able to spot signs and relate them to specific systems, so as to understand gravity of it and seek Veterinarian?s advice sooner.
16 people found this helpful

My female labrador, aged 9 years was diagnosed with diabetes which is now under control, but she has lost her vision due to a milky blue layer formation on the lens. Is it curable by surgery? What are the side effects post surgery?

MVSc (Ph.D pursuing)
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
No side effects. Get her eyes operated soon. Looks like a cataract. If you delay the vision may never come back.
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How could i comfort my dog in this summer?or could cut his hair(coat)short so that he should not feel too much heat. Please give me suggestion

MVSc
Veterinarian, Pune
U can do hair cutting as per recommend and in summer give him lot of water to drink and keep under fan .And walking timing r early morning and late night
1 person found this helpful
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My Dog is not eating. Her mouth has a terrible foul smell and has developed red rashes between her hind legs and under the tail. She has even become very aggressive and grumpy, and would not let anyone try to get her active.

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
How old is your pet? the foul smell could be from the dental disease. Kindly get her oral cavity evaluated for any dental disease/loose tooth/tarter/tooth root abscess etc. From a qualified Vet. These explorations are done generally under sedation. Take care.
2 people found this helpful

4 Way To Make Dog Healthy!

B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Rajkot

4 Way To Make Dog Healthy are:

1. Vaccinations 
2. Deworming
3. Right food timely 
4. Exercises 
 

1 person found this helpful

I have a black rabbit and he's 2 years old, my question is how can I help him wid his loose motions.

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
Please provide lacto bacillus powder (sporolac sachets) in his diet. You can add it in water or can feed directly also. Don't give any oral antibiotics as these may aggravate the condition. Thank you.
3 people found this helpful
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Hi, have a pet (dashing dog). Having itching, dandruff and hairfall problem from last 5 months. We tried all remedies like using neem oil massage, ridd etc but no use. Please suggest home remedies to cure immediately. Thanks.

MVSc
Veterinarian, Bareilly
Dear karthik, please go through following treatment for better result 1. Inj. Hitek 0.5 ml s/c and apply himax tube in local effectted area.
2 people found this helpful
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How many times to feed a stray dog? n what food to feed exactly so that they get all the nutrients they need?

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Feed twice with dog food available in the market at the rate of 300 gms in the morning and 200 in the evening . foods like pedigree, rc, hills, drools, smart heart , farmina , chickopee,etc a lot ranges available
2 people found this helpful
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