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Dr. Ashwatha K C

BVSC

Veterinarian, Bangalore

23 Years Experience  ·  100 at clinic
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Dr. Ashwatha K C BVSC Veterinarian, Bangalore
23 Years Experience  ·  100 at clinic
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Personal Statement

I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage....more
I want all my patients to be informed and knowledgeable about their health care, from treatment plans and services, to insurance coverage.
More about Dr. Ashwatha K C
Dr. Ashwatha K C is one of the best Veterinarians in yelahanka New Town, Bangalore. She has over 23 years of experience as a Veterinarian. She has done BVSC . You can visit her at Ganesh Pet Clinic in yelahanka New Town, Bangalore. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Ashwatha K C on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Veterinarians in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Veterinarians with more than 42 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Veterinarians online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
BVSC - Bangalore Veterinary College, - 1995
Languages spoken
English

Location

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Ganesh Pet Clinic

#682, Below Indian Overseas Bank, A Sector, Yelahanka New Town. Landmark: Opp. Seshadripuram CollegeBangalore Get Directions
100 at clinic
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My dog aged 4 years suffers from bad breath. I have tried brushing his teeth, which he does not like and is such a waste of time and energy. What should I do?

MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
I' m sure he must be enjoying taste of toothpaste too! please speak to your vet a schedule a dental cleaning/scaling appointment. Rule out other causes of bad breath such as - improper bowel movements, excess worm load etc.
1 person found this helpful

My dog is vomiting water like liquid little foamy with tiny bits of blood, it happened twice, one 5 days back in the morning around 4am, then at 2am. During vomiting he collapsed and paralyzed without any movement. Both time he woke up after 5 mins and he was active. I gave him Ranitac and vomited (half). Please help me, I am scared, he is 12 yrs old. 6 months back he had UTI. He is being given Nefrotec DS 2 tabs a day from 6 months as Advised by Vet. Please Please Help me, save my boy.

MVSc (Ph.D)
Veterinarian,
Your dog has chronic kidney problem and for that your vet has prescribed nefrotec ds2 tablets daily one since six months, which controls kidney damage, so continue further. You should not give him heavy food containing high fat & protein. Light diet like gruel of ragi, rice, wheat, rave should be given, with butter milk, soya milk also. Fruit juices, give perinorm injection which also controls vomition & then give ranitec orally 8 hourly. Give liver tonics like liv 52, or livobex orally 10 ml twice a day, imferon inj or its capsules with folic acid will help to build blood in the body. Sgot & sgpt & esr tests to be made to know the health condition of your dog. You should keep daily observation and make note of it. If vomition does not stop, take him to veterinary hospitals for iv fluids & further treatment for vomition.
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What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

B.V.Sc
Veterinarian, Ballia
What To Do If Your Pet Is Found Bleeding?

Bleeding pets often suffer blood loss as a result of trauma. If bleeding is severe or continuous, the animal may lose enough blood to cause shock (loss of as little as 2 teaspoons per pound of body weight may cause shock). Emergencies may arise that require the owner to control the bleeding, even if it is just during transport of the animal to the veterinary facility. Pet owners should know how to stop hemorrhage (bleeding) if their pet is injured.

 Techniques to stop external bleeding:-

 The following techniques are listed in order of preference. 

1) Direct pressure:--gently press a compress (a pad of clean cloth or gauze) over the bleeding absorbing the blood and allowing it to clot. Do not disturb blood clots after they have formed. If blood soaks through, do not remove the pad; simply add additional layers of cloth and continue the direct pressure more evenly. The compress can be bound in place using bandage material which frees the hands of the first provider for other emergency actions. In the absence of a compress, a bare hand or finger can be used. Direct pressure on a wound is the most preferable way to stop bleeding.

2) Elevation:--if there is a severely bleeding wound on the foot or leg, gently elevate the leg so that the wound is above the level of the heart. Elevation uses the force of gravity to help reduce blood pressure in the injured area, slowing the bleeding. Elevation is most effective in larger animals with longer limbs where greater distances from wound to heart are possible. Direct pressure with compresses should also be maintained to maximize the use of elevation. Elevation of a limb combined with direct pressure is an effective way to stop bleeding. 

3) Pressure on the supplying artery:-- if external bleeding continues following the use of direct pressure and elevation, finger or thumb pressure over the main artery to the wound is needed. Apply pressure to the femoral artery in the groin for severe bleeding of a rear leg; to the brachial artery in the inside part of the upper front leg for bleeding of a front leg; or to the caudal artery at the base of the tail if the wound is on the tail. Continue application of direct pressure.

4) Pressure above and below the bleeding wound:-- this can also be used in conjunction with direct pressure. Pressure above the wound will help control arterial bleeding. Pressure below the wound will help control bleeding from veins.

5) Tourniquet:--use of a tourniquet is dangerous and it should be used only for a severe, life-threatening hemorrhage in a limb (leg or tail) not expected to be saved. A wide (2-inch or more) piece of cloth should be used to wrap around the limb twice and tied into a knot. A short stick or similar object is then tied into the knot as well. Twist the stick to tighten the tourniquet until the bleeding stops. Secure the stick in place with another piece of cloth and make a written note of the time it was applied. Loosen the tourniquet for 15 to 20 seconds every 20 minutes. Remember this is dangerous and will likely result in disability or amputation. Use of a tourniquet should only be employed as a last-resort, life-saving measure!

6) Internal bleeding:--internal bleeding is a life-threatening condition, but it is not obvious like external bleeding. Any bleeding which is visible is external. 
Internal bleeding occurs inside the body and will not be seen. There are, however, external signs of internal bleeding: 
• the pet is pale (check the gums or eyelids).
• the pet is cool on the legs, ears, or tail. 
• the pet is extremely excited or unusually subdued. If any of these signs are evident, the pet should be immediately transported to a veterinary facility for professional help. Remember: internal bleeding is not visible on the outside.

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MVSc, BVSc
Veterinarian,
WHAT IS CANINE HIP DYSPLASIA?
Canine hip dysplasia is the abnormal development and growth of a dog's hip joint. It occurs commonly in large breed dogs such as Labrador retrievers, German Shepherds, Rottweilers, and Saint Bernards, but it can occur in dogs of any breed and size, and even in cats. There is no single cause of hip dysplasia; rather it is caused by multiple factors, some of which include genetics and nutrition. The abnormal development of the hip joint that occurs in young dogs with dysplasia leads to excessive hip joint laxity (looseness). This laxity causes stretching of the supporting ligaments, joint capsule, and muscles around the hip joint, leading to joint instability, pain, and permanent damage to the anatomy of the affected hip joint. If left untreated, dogs with hip dysplasia usually develop osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease).
Dogs with hip dysplasia commonly show clinical signs of hind limb lameness, pain, and muscle wasting (atrophy). Owners report that their dogs are lame after exercise, run with a "bunny-hopping" gait, are reluctant to rise or jump, or aren't as active as other puppies. Many dysplastic dogs will show these signs early in life (6-12 months of age), but some dogs do not show signs of pain until they are older.
Diagnosis: Examination by touch and confirmation by radiographs.
Treatment and care: Conservative treatment benefits many patients when they experience signs of hip dysplasia. This treatment includes enforced rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and pain medication. Once the clinical signs are controlled, the therapy includes weight reduction if needed and an exercise program designed to improve the strength of your pet’s rear legs. Such an exercise program might include swimming and walking uphill. Surgical treatment being more invasive, is not practiced regularly, and does not preclude the need of conservative therapy.
The signs may aggravate during the season transition and patients may need support of pain medications during such period.
Nutrition: For younger patients – food that supports development and tissue repair may be offered. Optimal nutrition is also targeted to reduce health risks associated with excessive calcium and phosphorus (which may cause skeletal problems), and excess calories (which may cause obesity). Dietary therapy for dogs with hip dysplasia includes a diet that will help dogs run better, play better and rise more easily while maintaining optimal body weight. A joint diet should have added EPA (eicosapentanoic acid) an omega-3 fatty acid that has been shown to help maintain joint function, enhanced levels of glucosamine and chondroitin to provide the building blocks of healthy cartilage
and L-carnitine to maintain optimal weight.
Pets with hip dysplasia should not be mated/bred, as they can potentially transmit the “Defective Gene” to their progeny!
2 people found this helpful

On bump my dog got a wound, what should i do now ? what precautins may be taken .

MVSC
Veterinarian, Hyderabad
What is the dimension of the wound. Is it Small or big. Is it bleeding. First clean the wound with her normal bath soap and can apply soframycin skin ointment on the wound. If so much hair there trim the hair and apply the ointment.
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I have a lab puppy we gave him curd since he has loose now often he sounds as if he will vomit and coughs a little then.

BHMS
Homeopath, Faridabad
Hi, give him homoeoathic medicine as they can be given to animals and are effective on them! give arsenic alb. 30 and nux vomica 30 - both 3 times a day daily for few days.
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My pet dog scooby,12 years old,eats well ,passes normal stools.But always sleeping.Not active as before.

Master of sciences, B.V.Sc. & A.H.
Veterinarian, Salem
Age might be a problem , still need to rule out systemic diseases and cardiac function. Try liver supplement with your vets advice.
2 people found this helpful
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My pet stopped eating since 5-6 days. Ealier she used to have 5 chapatis a day and that too with non veg 3 times a day. But now she has stopped eating anything. We have been consulting vets doctor for the same and every time they dies is inject her. As per them she is suffering from hyper acidity. As per their suggestions we are giving her gelusil, curd, but mostly she vomits out after eating grass. I am very worried for her. Please help. I really want her to be ok again. She is of age 14 and a half. Please help.

M.V.Sc. & PhD Scholar Veterinary Medicine
Veterinarian, Navi Mumbai
Hi, since your pet is not responding to the traditional line of treatment for gastric disturbances, I will suggest you to get her blood tests done viz. Cbc, liver function test and most importantly renal function test. This will help you to rule out the extreme scenario, if any. Further, specific line of treatment can be suggested as per the alterations in blood reports. Thank you.
15 people found this helpful
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