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Dr. Aravinda Jawali

Psychiatrist, Bangalore

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Dr. Aravinda Jawali Psychiatrist, Bangalore
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My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them....more
My favorite part of being a doctor is the opportunity to directly improve the health and wellbeing of my patients and to develop professional and personal relationships with them.
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Dr. Aravinda Jawali is a popular Psychiatrist in Vidyaranyapura, Bangalore. You can consult Dr. Aravinda Jawali at Cloud Telepsychiatry Centre in Vidyaranyapura, Bangalore. You can book an instant appointment online with Dr. Aravinda Jawali on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Psychiatrists in India. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 39 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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75, 12th "A" Cross, Sir M.v. Layout, Thindlu Busstand, Vidyaranyapura, Landmark: Near Satya Green Appts RoadBangalore Get Directions
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I lost somebody last year, I am not able to forget him, please help me Please suggest me I am depression.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology, Positive Psychiatry and Mental Health
Psychologist, Palakkad
I lost somebody last year, I am not able to forget him, please help me Please suggest me I am depression.
Dear Lybrate user. I can understand. Loosing someone dear and near causes grief. Grief leads to disappointment. Grief related disappointment manifests symptoms as in the case of depression. But disappointment symptoms are far shorter in duration than depression. These symptoms will vanish in some days or weeks. Don’t worry. Physical exercise, outdoor games, entertainment, hobbies etc could help you divert your attention. I suggest cognitive therapy. Take care.
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I am 18 years old and I am suffering from body pains and headache from past 6 months.

MBBS
General Physician, Cuttack
I am 18 years old and I am suffering from body pains and headache from past 6 months.
If you have recurrent attack of headache1. It could be a tension headache due to anxiety/stress, depression inadequate sleep, low bp/high bp, migraine, prolonged use of cell phone/computer, chronic anaemia, refractive error, chronic sinusitis, organic brain lesion 2. Avoid stress, physical and mental exertion, have adequate sound sleep for 7-8 hours daily in the night 3. Go for regular exercise 4. Practice yoga, meditation and deep breathing exercise to calm your mind, control your emotion and relieve stress 5. Check for refractive error, sinusitis hemoglobin, bp 6. Avoid prolonged use of cell phone/computer 7. Consult neurologist to rule out other causes of headache, if required take a ct scan of head to exclude any brain lesion 8. If it is migraine you have to take migraine prophylactic drug after consulting neurologist.
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How to quit smoking

Diploma In Family Medicine, M.Sc - Psychotherapy
Sexologist, Pune

Source: Helpguide.org

Whether you’re a teen smoker or a lifetime pack–a–day smoker, quitting can be tough. But the more you learn about your options and prepare for quitting, the easier the process will be. With the right game plan tailored to your needs, you can break the addiction, manage your cravings, and join the millions of people who have kicked the habit for good.

Why quitting smoking can seem so hard

Smoking tobacco is both a physical addiction and a psychological habit. The nicotine from cigarettes provides a temporary, and addictive, high. Eliminating that regular fix of nicotine will cause your body to experience physical withdrawal symptoms and cravings. Because of nicotine’s “feel good” effect on the brain, you may also have become accustomed to smoking as a way of coping with stress, depression, anxiety, or even boredom.

At the same time, the act of smoking is ingrained as a daily ritual. It may be an automatic response for you to smoke a cigarette with your morning coffee, while taking a break from work or school, or during your commute home at the end of a long day. Perhaps friends, family members, and colleagues smoke, and it has become part of the way you relate with them.

To successfully quit smoking, you’ll need to address both the addiction and the habits and routines that go along with it.

Your Personal Stop Smoking Plan

While some smokers successfully quit by going cold turkey, most people do better with a plan to keep themselves on track. A good plan addresses both the short–term challenge of quitting smoking and the long–term challenge of preventing relapse. It should also be tailored to your specific needs and smoking habits.

Questions to ask yourself

Take the time to think of what kind of smoker you are, which moments of your life call for a cigarette, and why. This will help you to identify which tips, techniques or therapies may be most beneficial for you.

  • Do you feel the need to smoke at every meal?
  • Are you more of a social smoker?
  • Is it a very bad addiction (more than a pack a day)? Or would a simple nicotine patch do the job?
  • Do you reach for cigarettes when you're feeling stressed or down?
  • Are there certain activities, places, or people you associate with smoking?
  • Is your cigarette smoking linked to other addictions, such as alcohol or gambling?
  • Are you open to hypnotherapy and/or acupuncture?
  • Are you someone who is open to talking about your addiction with a therapist or counselor?
  • Are you interested in getting into a fitness program?

Start your stop smoking plan with START

S = Set a quit date.

Choose a date within the next 2 weeks, so you have enough time to prepare without losing your motivation to quit. If you mainly smoke at work, quit on the weekend, so you have a few days to adjust to the change.

T = Tell family, friends, and co-workers that you plan to quit.

Let your friends and family in on your plan to quit smoking and tell them you need their support and encouragement to stop. Look for a quit buddy who wants to stop smoking as well. You can help each other get through the rough times.

A = Anticipate and plan for the challenges you'll face while quitting.

Most people who begin smoking again do so within the first 3 months. You can help yourself make it through by preparing ahead for common challenges, such as nicotine withdrawal and cigarette cravings.

R = Remove cigarettes and other tobacco products from your home, car, and work.

Throw away all of your cigarettes (no emergency pack!), lighters, ashtrays, and matches. Wash your clothes and freshen up anything that smells like smoke. Shampoo your car, clean your drapes and carpet, and steam your furniture.

T = Talk to your doctor about getting help to quit.

Your doctor can prescribe medication to help with withdrawal and suggest other alternatives. If you can't see a doctor, you can get many products over the counter at your local pharmacy or grocery store, including the nicotine patch, nicotine lozenges, and nicotine gum.

How to quit smoking: Identify your smoking triggers

One of the best things you can do to help yourself quit is to identify the things that make you want to smoke, including specific situations, activities, feelings, and people.

Keep a craving journal

A craving journal can help you zero in on your patterns and triggers. For a week or so leading up to your quit date, keep a log of your smoking. Note the moments in each day when you crave a cigarette:

  • What time was it?
  • How intense was the craving (on a scale of 1-10)?
  • What were you doing?
  • Who were you with?
  • How were you feeling?
  • How did you feel after smoking?

Do you smoke to relieve unpleasant or overwhelming feelings?

Managing unpleasant feelings such as stress, depression, loneliness, fear, and anxiety are some of the most common reasons why adults smoke. When you have a bad day, it can seem like cigarettes are your only friend. As much comfort as cigarettes provide, though, it's important to remember that there are healthier (and more effective) ways to keep unpleasant feelings in check. These may include exercising, meditating, using sensory relaxation strategies, and practicing simple breathing exercises.

For many people, an important aspect of quitting smoking is to find alternate ways to handle these difficult feelings without smoking. Even when cigarettes are no longer a part of your life, the painful and unpleasant feelings that may have prompted you to smoke in the past will still remain. So, it's worth spending some time thinking about the different ways you intend to deal with stressful situations and the daily irritations that would normally have you reaching for a cigarette.

Tips for avoiding common smoking triggers

  • Alcohol. Many people have a habit of smoking when they drink. TIP: switch to non-alcoholic drinks or drink only in places where smoking inside is prohibited. Alternatively, try snacking on nuts and chips, or chewing on a straw or cocktail stick.
  • Other smokers. When friends, family, and co-workers smoke around you, it is doubly difficult to quit or avoid relapse. TIP: Your social circles need to know that you are changing your habits so talk about your decision to quit. Let them know they won't be able to smoke when you're in the car with them or taking a coffee break together. In your workplace, don't take all your coffee breaks with smokers only, do something else instead, or find non-smokers to have your breaks with.
  • End of a meal. For some smokers, ending a meal means lighting up, and the prospect of giving that up may appear daunting. TIP: replace that moment after a meal with something such as a piece of fruit, a (healthy) dessert, a square of chocolate, or a stick of gum.

How to quit smoking: Coping with nicotine withdrawal symptoms

Once you stop smoking, you will experience a number of physical symptoms as your body withdraws from nicotine. Nicotine withdrawal begins quickly, usually starting within thirty minutes to an hour of the last cigarette and peaking about 2 to 3 days later. Withdrawal symptoms can last for a few days to several weeks and differ from person to person.

Common nicotine withdrawal symptoms include:

Unpleasant as these withdrawal symptoms may be, they are only temporary. They will get better in a few weeks as the toxins are flushed from your body. In the meantime, let your friends and family know that you won't be your usual self and ask for their understanding.

Coping with Nicotine Withdrawal Symptoms

Symptom

Duration

Relief

Craving for cigarette

Most intense during first week but can linger for months

Wait out the urge; distract yourself; take a brisk walk.

Irritability, impatience

Two to four weeks

Exercise; take hot baths; use relaxation techniques; avoid caffeine.

Insomnia

Two to four weeks

Avoid caffeine after 6 p.m.; use relaxation techniques; exercise; plan activities (such as reading) when sleep is difficult.

Fatigue

Two to four weeks

Take naps; do not push yourself.

Lack of concentration

A few weeks

Reduce workload; avoid stress.

Hunger

Several weeks or longer

Drink water or low-calorie drinks; eat low-calorie snacks.

Coughing, dry throat, nasal drip

Several weeks

Drink plenty of fluids; use cough drops.

Constipation, gas

One to two weeks

Drink plenty of fluids; add fiber to diet; exercise.

Adapted with permission from Overcoming Addiction: Paths Toward Recovery, a special health report from Harvard Health Publications.

How to quit smoking: Manage cigarette cravings

Avoiding smoking triggers will help reduce the urge to smoke, but you can't avoid cravings entirely. But cigarette cravings don't last long, so if you're tempted to light up, remember that the craving will pass and try to wait it out. It also helps to be prepared in advance. Having a plan to cope with cravings will help keep you from giving in.

  • Distract yourself. Do the dishes, turn on the TV, take a shower, or call a friend. The activity doesn't matter as long as it gets your mind off of smoking.
  • Remind yourself why you quit. Focus on your reasons for quitting, including the health benefits, improved appearance, money you're saving, and enhanced self-esteem.
  • Get out of a tempting situation. Where you are or what you're doing may be triggering the craving. If so, a change of scenery can make all the difference.
  • Reward yourself. Reinforce your victories. Whenever you triumph over a craving, give yourself a reward to keep yourself motivated.

Coping with Cigarette Cravings in the Moment

Find an oral substitute

Keep other things around to pop in your mouth when cravings hit. Good choices include mints, hard candy, carrot or celery sticks, gum, and sunflower seeds.

Keep your mind busy

Read a book or magazine, listen to some music you love, do a crossword or Sudoku puzzle, or play an online game.

Keep your hands busy

Squeeze balls, pencils, or paper clips are good substitutes to satisfy that need for tactile stimulation.

Brush your teeth

The just–brushed, clean feeling can help get rid of cigarette cravings.

Drink water

Slowly drink a large, cold glass of water. Not only will it help the craving pass, but staying hydrated helps minimize the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal.

Light something else

Instead of lighting a cigarette, light a candle or some incense.

Get active

Go for a walk, do some jumping jacks or pushups, try some yoga stretches, or run around the block.

Try to relax

Do something that calms you down, such as taking a warm bath, meditating, reading a book, or practicing deep breathing exercises.

Preventing weight gain after you’ve stopped smoking

Weight gain is a common concern when quitting smoking. Some people even use it as a reason not to quit. While it's true that many smokers put on weight within six months of stopping smoking, the gain is usually small—about 5 pounds on average—and that initial gain decreases over time. It’s also important to remember that carrying a few extra pounds for a few months won’t hurt your heart as much as smoking will. Of course, gaining weight is NOT inevitable when you quit smoking.

Smoking acts as an appetite suppressant. It also dampens your sense of smell and taste. So after you quit, your appetite will likely increase and food will seem more appealing. Weight gain can also happen if you replace the oral gratification of smoking with eating, especially if you turn to unhealthy comfort foods. So it's important to find other, healthy ways to deal with stress and other unpleasant feelings rather than mindless, emotional eating.

  • Nurture yourself. Instead of turning to cigarettes or food when you feel stressed, anxious, or depressed, learn new ways to soothe yourself.
  • Eat healthy, varied meals. Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables and limit your fat intake. Seek out low-fat options that look appetizing to you and you will actually eat. Avoid alcohol, sugary sodas, and other high-calorie drinks.
  • Drink lots of water. Drinking lots of water—at least six to eight 8 oz. glasses—will help you feel full and keep you from eating when you're not hungry. Water will also help flush toxins from your body.
  • Take a walk. Walking is a great form of exercise. Not only will it help you burn calories and keep the weight off, but it will also help alleviate feelings of stress and frustration that accompany smoking withdrawal.
  • Snack on low-calorie or calorie-free foods. Good choices include sugar-free gum, carrot and celery sticks, sliced bell peppers or jicama, or sugar-free hard candies.

Medication and therapy to help you quit smoking

There are many different methods that have successfully helped people to quit smoking, including:

  • Quitting smoking cold turkey.
  • Systematically decreasing the number of cigarettes you smoke.
  • Reducing your intake of nicotine gradually over time.
  • Using nicotine replacement therapy or non-nicotine medications to reduce withdrawal symptoms.
  • Utilizing nicotine support groups.
  • Trying hypnosis, acupuncture, or counseling using cognitive behavioral techniques.

You may be successful with the first method you try. More likely, you’ll have to try a number of different methods or a combination of treatments to find the ones that work best for you.

Medications to help you stop smoking

Smoking cessation medications can ease withdrawal symptoms and reduce cravings, and are most effective when used as part of a comprehensive stop smoking program monitored by your physician. Talk to your doctor about your options and whether an anti-smoking medication is right for you. U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved options are:

Nicotine replacement therapy. Nicotine replacement therapy involves "replacing" cigarettes with other nicotine substitutes, such as nicotine gum or a nicotine patch. It works by delivering small and steady doses of nicotine into the body to relieve some of the withdrawal symptoms without the tars and poisonous gases found in cigarettes. This type of treatment helps smokers focus on breaking their psychological addiction and makes it easier to concentrate on learning new behaviors and coping skills.

Non-nicotine medication. These medications help you stop smoking by reducing cravings and withdrawal symptoms without the use of nicotine. Medications such as bupropion (Zyban) and varenicline (Chantix) are intended for short-term use only.

Alternative therapies to help you stop smoking

There are several things you can do to stop smoking that don’t involve nicotine replacement therapy or prescription medications: Ask your doctor for a referral or see Resources and References below for help finding qualified professionals in each area.

  • Hypnosis A popular option that has produced good results. Forget anything you may have seen from stage hypnotists, hypnosis works by getting you into a deeply relaxed state where you are open to suggestions that strengthen your resolve to quit smoking and increase your negative feelings toward cigarettes.
  • Acupuncture One of the oldest known medical techniques, acupuncture is believed to work by triggering the release of endorphins (natural pain relievers) that allow the body to relax. As a smoking cessation aid, acupuncture can be helpful in managing smoking withdrawal symptoms.
  • Behavioral Therapy Nicotine addiction is related to the habitual behaviors (the “rituals”) involved in smoking. Behavior therapy focuses on learning new coping skills and breaking those habits.
  • Motivational Therapies Self-help books and websites can provide a number of ways to motivate yourself to quit smoking. One well known example is calculating the monetary savings. Some people have been able to find the motivation to quit just by calculating how much money they will save. It may be enough to pay for a summer vacation.

Smokeless or spit tobacco is NOT a healthy alternative to smoking

Smokeless tobacco, otherwise known as spit tobacco, is not a safe alternative to smoking cigarettes. It contains the same addictive chemical, nicotine, contained in cigarettes. In fact, the amount of nicotine absorbed from smokeless tobacco can be 3 to 4 times the amount delivered by a cigarette.

What to do if you slip or relapse

Most people try to quit smoking several times before they kick the habit for good, so don't beat yourself up if you start smoking again. Turn the relapse into a rebound by learning from your mistake. Analyze what happened right before you started smoking again, identify the triggers or trouble spots you ran into, and make a new stop-smoking plan that eliminates them.

It's also important to emphasize the difference between a slip and a relapse. If you slip up and smoke a cigarette, it doesn't mean that you can't get back on the wagon. You can choose to learn from the slip and let it motivate you to try harder or you can use it as an excuse to go back to your smoking habit. But the choice is yours. A slip doesn't have to turn into a full-blown relapse.

I started smoking again, now what?

Having a small setback doesn’t mean you’re a smoker again. Most people try to quit smoking several times before they kick the habit for good. Identify the triggers or trouble spots you ran into and learn from your mistakes.  

  • You’re not a failure if you slip up. It doesn't mean you can't quit for good.
  • Don’t let a slip become a mudslide. Throw out the rest of the pack. It's important to get back on the non-smoking track now.
  • Look back at your quit log and feel good about the time you went without smoking.
  • Find the trigger. Exactly what was it that made you smoke again? Decide how you will cope with that issue the next time it comes up.
  • Learn from your experience. What has been most helpful? What didn’t work? 
  • Are you using a medicine to help you quit? Call your doctor if you start smoking again. Some medicines cannot be used if you are smoking at the same time.
1 person found this helpful

She is at age of 27. She is suffering with ocd of fear of contamination and always feels that she smashed lizard with hand or lizard may be on her body and being poisonous it will harm as a result she starts washing hand for along time whenever she goes for hand wash usually takes 2 to 3 minutes. But if we try to make her understand she irritates too much and goes for bath rigidly and she will collect all cloths nearby her for wash. And during irritation she becomes abusive with slang word sometime and try to make it loud in order to embarrass us. But whenever she calms regret it. But she tried a lot to overcome but it becomes compulsion to her and she couldn't avoid. She is suffering with more than a year it was severe till two month back but she controlled it herself without treatment because she feels embarrassment to go to doctor but she wants to overcome it. And also advise me how to deal in this situation because it irritates us too much as during wash she always frustrates with herself and blame us for this and be abusive.

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Chennai
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common mental health problem. Symptoms typically include recurring thoughts and repetitive actions in response to the recurring thoughts. A common example is recurring thoughts about germs and dirt, with a need to wash your hands repeatedly to "clean off the germs". However, there are many other examples. The usual treatments are cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant medicine, or both. Treatment often works well to reduce the symptoms and distress of OCD greatly.
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I am talking myself in nights while sleeping. Please tell me how to get rid of it?

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology, Positive Psychiatry and Mental Health
Psychologist, Palakkad
I am talking myself in nights while sleeping. Please tell me how to get rid of it?
Dear user. Sleep talking, or somniloquy, is the act of speaking during sleep. It's a type of parasomnia -- an abnormal behavior that takes place during sleep. It's a very common occurrence and is not usually considered a medical problem. Ignore it for better results. Take care.
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I am always depressed for everything, for that my health goes down, what can I do?

M.Sc Applied Psychology, Advanced Diploma Child Guidance & Counselling
Psychologist, Delhi
I am always depressed for everything, for that my health goes down, what can I do?
Hello sometimes our life circumstances are like that we do feel low or depressed. Try to reflect upon it and find out the reasons for it. For this you can make use of diary. Every time you feel low, try to write about the situation making you low and associated thoughts and feelings with it. If you practice this in your life then you will be able to find the root cause for these feelings. Also it will help you to find the triggering point for these thoughts and feelings and as soon as these negativity starts come in you can distract yourself by engaging into a positive task like any hobby, listening to good music. You can also try to modify your daily schedule. Try to go for walk in the morning or gym. Bring yoga and meditation in your life. Develop a new hobby which will bring happiness. You can also try read self healing books like the secret, the magic etc. I hope you will find these tips appropriate and will try to apply these in your life.
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I am 58 yrs old and I have been taking metformine 500 for the last 6 months I have back and neck ache running nose and anxiety my heart beets is also increased.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology, Positive Psychiatry and Mental Health
Psychologist, Palakkad
I am 58 yrs old and I have been taking metformine 500 for the last 6 months I have back and neck ache running nose an...
Dear, metformine is a medicine which is used in diabetes mellitus. You are already having this medicine for last 6 months. Back ache, running nose and anxiety symptoms etc are some of the less common the side effect of this medicine. You should consult your diabetician for further advise and change in the medicine. Take care.
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I am preparing for an exam. So how many hours sleep do I need? I sleep from 12-8am. I also feel sleepy in the afternoon. So I sleep from 3-5 pm. Is this good?

BAMS
Ayurveda, Ambala
I am preparing for an exam. So how many hours sleep do I need? I sleep from 12-8am. I also feel sleepy in the afterno...
Dear, you should sleep for upto 8 hours for proper function of brain & good memory. As you said you sleep in afternoon, that is good. But you have to decrease the sleep time of day upto 1 hour only.
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मेरे पप्पा की उम्र 52 साल है.उन्हे शराब की लत है.वो महिनेमे 10-12 दिन लगातार शराब पिते है.फिर उन्हे बोहत तकलीफ होती है,blood omity है.कोई घरघुती उपाय बताईऐ.

BHMS
Homeopath, Murshidabad
मेरे पप्पा की उम्र 52 साल है.उन्हे शराब की लत है.वो महिनेमे 10-12 दिन लगातार शराब पिते है.फिर उन्हे बोहत तकलीफ होती ह...
To quit drinking he needs to take medicine. However it is very evident that he won't agree to take the medicine if he comes to know about it. You have to administer the medicine for alcohol de-addiction without letting him know. So the medicine should be colourless, odourless, tasteless. For this purpose Homeopathy has an excellent remedy. The remedy not only fulfills the criteria of being colourless, odourless & tasteless but at the same time it is fully soluble in water. You just have to add 20 drops of the medicine to every litre of water. Just keep a separate bottle for the patient. Add 20 drops of the medicine to each litre of water. For example if the bottle contains 2 liters of water then add 40 drops of the medicine. Now whenever the patient asks for water give him that particular medicine mixed water. He will easily drink 2 litres of water in 24 hours. Thus you will be able to administer the medicine for de-addiction of alcohol without even letting him know. You can even give him this medicine mixed water to prepare his peg if he drinks alcohol at home. A quick response is noted in patients who have taken 60 drops of the medicine daily. Now note down the name of the medicine. The medicine is Homeopathic Mother Tincture ACID SULPH Q. You can find it at any Homeopathic Medicine retail shop. Just buy a 100 ml pack for one month. You will able to notice a difference within 10 days of starting of the medicine if you can administer the medicine as 60 drops daily. This medicine will reduce his craving for alcohol without producing any type of side-effects.
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Doctor please tell me what should be done to clear smoking effects and regain stamina I had smoked for 3 years and Wat medical test to be done to check smoking effect of my body .please doctor help me.

MS - Counselling & Psychotherapy, Master of Arts In Clinical Psychology, Bachelor of Arts - Psychology & English Literature
Psychologist, Coimbatore
Hi You need to undergo treatment and counselling for the same. You need to undergo certain tests like Pulmonary Function Test and Spirometry test, which will help you to check the effectiveness of smoking. If you need further assistance feel free to contact me either through text chat or call me when you find difficulty to manage. Tame care. Not too late to stop. With regards
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