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Dr. Anand A Rao

Psychiatrist, Bangalore

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Dr. Anand A Rao Psychiatrist, Bangalore
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I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family....more
I'm dedicated to providing optimal health care in a relaxed environment where I treat every patients as if they were my own family.
More about Dr. Anand A Rao
Dr. Anand A Rao is an experienced Psychiatrist in Banashankari, Bangalore. He is currently associated with Psycho Clinic& Resource Centre in Banashankari, Bangalore. Book an appointment online with Dr. Anand A Rao on Lybrate.com.

Find numerous Psychiatrists in India from the comfort of your home on Lybrate.com. You will find Psychiatrists with more than 39 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Psychiatrists online in Bangalore and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Pls explain the male psychology about love and relationships. My relationship is on the verge. Still my bf blames Me that m the at fault but actually he is at fault. He tells my friends he knows his mistakes but in front of Me he behaves different. And whenever I try to cut off and ignore. He chases me. And then feels v bad about it that how could I leave him. Still he goes with is friends only and those are the ones who criticise about me a lot.I'M much confused. Pls help me to make everything smooth like before. Or help me about how can I forget things and move on. I'M 20.

M.S. Counselling and Psychotherapy
Psychologist
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Pls explain the male psychology about love and relationships. My relationship is on the verge. Still my bf blames Me ...
Dear lybrate user, this is typical in a couple relationship. This happens because the boy and the girl belong to completely different families which have different values and beliefs. Both - the boy and the girl have certain expectations from their partner, which is a result of their own perception. When these expectations are not met, the problems in the relationship starts. It is advisable that either, you both or at least you yourself need to consult a counsellor for pri- marital counselling. The counsellor will do the needful. Please seek professional help, before getting married, irrespective of whether you remain in the same relationship or you want to move on.

I feel like people are mocking me or I'm losing friends. I had a big group of friends but I feel apart with some due to arguments, then had another group and now we moved on to different countries so lost touch again, I feel lonely. Although I have a caring wife and a small kid I feel as if I don't fit with groups like I did before. I used to be the centre of fun.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist
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I feel like people are mocking me or I'm losing friends. I had a big group of friends but I feel apart with some due ...
Dear lybrate user. I can understand. Age and experience makes people wise. Wise people easily starts understanding other people and prefer to be away from people who do not fit their crieteria. In your case too, you are being wise. Don't worry. But you should try to get friends. Meet two ir three new people daily and try to talk to them every week. You may get one or two same wavelength people out of 100 or so such friends. You can make them intimate friends. You must try, for sure. Otherwise just enjoy life without friends, there are many people who do that. Take care.

Hi I am affected by death illness I fear in some time the heart attack will come to me like that on that time I can't able to conce. on my studies and also in my work So how do I forget it please help me.

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry, MBA (Healthcare)
Psychiatrist
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Hi I am affected by death illness I fear in some time the heart attack will come to me like that on that time I can't...
Hi there How to Stop Worrying Self-Help Strategies for Relief from Anxieties, Worries, and Fears Self-Help for Anxiety Relief Worrying can be helpful when it spurs you to take action and solve a problem. But if you’re preoccupied with “what ifs” and worst-case scenarios, worry becomes a problem. Unrelenting doubts and fears can be paralyzing. They can sap your emotional energy, send your anxiety levels soaring, and interfere with your daily life. But chronic worrying is a mental habit that can be broken. You can train your brain to stay calm and look at life from a more positive perspective. Why is it so hard to stop worrying? No one likes the way constant worrying makes you feel, so why is it so difficult to stop? The answer lies in the beliefs—both negative and positive—you have about worrying. On the negative side, you may believe that your constant worrying is going to spiral completely out of control, drive you crazy, or damage your health. On the positive side, you may believe that your worrying helps you avoid bad things, prepare for the worst, or come up with solutions. You may even believe that worrying shows you’re a caring and conscientious person. Negative beliefs, or worrying about worrying, add to your anxiety and keep it going (much in the same way worrying about getting to sleep often keeps you awake). But positive beliefs about worrying can be even more damaging. It’s tough to break the worry habit if you believe that your worrying protects you. In order to stop worry and anxiety for good, you must give up your belief that worrying serves a positive purpose. Once you realize that worrying is the problem, not the solution, you can regain control of your worried mind. Worry and anxiety self-help tip #1: Create a worry period It’s tough to be productive in your daily life when anxiety and worry are dominating your thoughts. But what can you do? Telling yourself to stop worrying doesn’t work—at least not for long. You can distract yourself for a moment, but you can’t banish anxious thoughts for good. In fact, trying to do so often makes them stronger and more persistent. You can test this out for yourself. Close your eyes and picture a pink elephant. Once you can see itin your mind, stop thinking about it. Whatever you do, for the next 60 seconds, don’t think about pink elephants! How did you do? Did thoughts of pink elephants keep popping in your brain? Why trying to stop anxious thoughts doesn’t work “Thought stopping” backfires because it forces you to pay extra attention to the very thought you want to avoid. You always have to be watching for it, and this very emphasis makes it seem even more important. But that doesn’t mean there’s nothing you can do to control worry. You just need a different approach. This is where the strategy of postponing worrying comes in. Rather than trying to stop or get rid of an anxious thought, give yourself permission to have it, but put off dwelling on it until later. Learn to postpone worrying Create a “worry period.” Choose a set time and place for worrying. It should be the same every day (e.g. In the living room from 5: 00 to 5: 20 p.m.) and early enough that it won’t make you anxious right before bedtime. During your worry period, you’re allowed to worry about whatever’s on your mind. The rest of the day, however, is a worry-free zone. Postpone your worry. If an anxious thought or worry comes into your head during the day, make a brief note of it and then continue about your day. Remind yourself that you’ll have time to think about it later, so there’s no need to worry about it right now. Go over your “worry list” during the worry period. If the thoughts you wrote down are still bothering you, allow yourself to worry about them, but only for the amount of time you’ve specified for your worry period. If they don’t seem important any more, cut your worry period short and enjoy the rest of your day. Postponing worrying is effective because it breaks the habit of dwelling on worries when you’ve got other things to do, yet there’s no struggle to suppress the thought or judge it. You simply save it for later. And as you develop the ability to postpone your anxious thoughts, you’ll start to realize that you have more control than you think. Worry and anxiety self-help tip #2: Ask yourself if the problem is solvable Research shows that while you’re worrying, you temporarily feel less anxious. Running over the problem in your head distracts you from your emotions and makes you feel like you’re getting something accomplished. But worrying and problem solving are two very different things. Problem solving involves evaluating a situation, coming up with concrete steps for dealing with it, and then putting the plan into action. Worrying, on the other hand, rarely leads to solutions. No matter how much time you spend dwelling on worst-case scenarios, you’re no more prepared to deal with them should they actually happen. Distinguish between solvable and unsolvable worries If a worry pops into your head, start by asking yourself whether the problem is something you can actually solve. The following questions can help: Is the problem something you’re currently facing, rather than an imaginary what-if? If the problem is an imaginary what-if, how likely is it to happen? Is your concern realistic? Can you do something about the problem or prepare for it, or is it out of your control? Productive, solvable worries are those you can take action on right away. For example, if you’re worried about your bills, you could call your creditors to see about flexible payment options. Unproductive, unsolvable worries are those for which there is no corresponding action. “What if I get cancer someday?” or “What if my kid gets into an accident?” If the worry is solvable, start brainstorming. Make a list of all the possible solutions you can think of. Try not to get too hung up on finding the perfect solution. Focus on the things you have the power to change, rather than the circumstances or realities beyond your control. After you’ve evaluated your options, make a plan of action. Once you have a plan and start doing something about the problem, you’ll feel much less worried. Dealing with unsolvable worries But what if the worry isn’t something you can solve? If you’re a chronic worrier, the vast majority of your anxious thoughts probably fall in this camp. In such cases, it’s important to tune into your emotions. As previously mentioned, worrying helps you avoid unpleasant emotions. Worrying keeps you in your head, thinking about how to solve problems rather than allowing yourself to feel the underlying emotions. But you can’t worry your emotions away. While you’re worrying, your feelings are temporarily suppressed, but as soon as you stop, they bounce back. And then, you start worrying about your feelings: “What’s wrong with me? I shouldn’t feel this way!” The only way out of this vicious cycle is by learning to embrace your feelings. This may seem scary at first because of negative beliefs you have about emotions. For example, you may believe that you should always be rational and in control, that your feelings should always make sense, or that you shouldn’t feel certain emotions, such as fear or anger. The truth is that emotions—like life—are messy. They don’t always make sense and they’re not always pleasant. But as long as you can accept your feelings as part of being human, you’ll be able to experience them without becoming overwhelmed and learn how to use them to your advantage. The following tips will help you find a better balance between your intellect and your emotions. Worry and anxiety self-help tip #3: Challenge anxious thoughts If you suffer from chronic anxiety and worries, chances are you look at the world in ways that make it seem more dangerous than it really is. For example, you may overestimate the possibility that things will turn out badly, jump immediately to worst-case scenarios, or treat every negative thought as if it were fact. You may also discredit your own ability to handle life’s problems, assuming you’ll fall apart at the first sign of trouble. These irrational, pessimistic attitudes are known as cognitive distortions. Although cognitive distortions aren’t based on reality, they’re not easy to give up. Often, they’re part of a lifelong pattern of thinking that’s become so automatic you’re not even completely aware of it. In order to break these bad thinking habits and stop the worry and anxiety they bring, you must retrain your brain. Start by identifying the frightening thought, being as detailed as possible about what scares or worries you. Then, instead of viewing your thoughts as facts, treat them as hypotheses you’re testing out. As you examine and challenge your worries and fears, you’ll develop a more balanced perspective. Stop worrying by questioning the anxious thought What’s the evidence that the thought is true? That it’s not true? Is there a more positive, realistic way of looking at the situation? What’s the probability that what I’m scared of will actually happen? If the probability is low, what are some more likely outcomes? Is the thought helpful? How will worrying about it help me and how will it hurt me? What would I say to a friend who had this worry? Cognitive Distortions that Add to Anxiety, Worry, and Stress All-or-nothing thinking – Looking at things in black-or-white categories, with no middle ground. “If I fall short of perfection, I’m a total failure.” Overgeneralization – Generalizing from a single negative experience, expecting it to hold true forever. “I didn’t get hired for the job. I’ll never get any job.” The mental filter – Focusing on the negatives while filtering out all the positives. Noticing the one thing that went wrong, rather than all the things that went right. Diminishing the positive – Coming up with reasons why positive events don’t count. “I did well on the presentation, but that was just dumb luck.” Jumping to conclusions – Making negative interpretations without actual evidence. You act like a mind reader, “I can tell she secretly hates me.” Or a fortune teller, “I just know something terrible is going to happen.” Catastrophizing – Expecting the worst-case scenario to happen. “The pilot said we’re in for some turbulence. The plane’s going to crash!” Emotional reasoning – Believing that the way you feel reflects reality. “I feel frightened right now. That must mean I’m in real physical danger.” 'Shoulds’ and ‘should-nots’ – Holding yourself to a strict list of what you should and shouldn’t do and beating yourself up if you break any of the rules Labeling – Labeling yourself based on mistakes and perceived shortcomings. “I’m a failure; an idiot; a loser.” Personalization – Assuming responsibility for things that are outside your control. “It’s my fault my son got in an accident. I should have warned him to drive carefully in the rain.” Worry and anxiety self-help tip #4: Accept uncertainty The inability to tolerate uncertainty plays a huge role in anxiety and worry. Chronic worriers can’t stand doubt or unpredictability. They need to know with 100 percent certainty what’s going to happen. Worrying is seen as a way to predict what the future has in store—a way to prevent unpleasant surprises and control the outcome. The problem is, it doesn’t work. Thinking about all the things that could go wrong doesn’t make life any more predictable. You may feel safer when you’re worrying, but it’s just an illusion. Focusing on worst-case scenarios won’t keep bad things from happening. It will only keep you from enjoying the good things you have in the present. So if you want to stop worrying, start by tackling your need for certainty and immediate answers. Challenging intolerance of uncertainty: The key to anxiety relief Ask yourself the following questions and write down your responses. See if you can come to an understanding of the disadvantages and problems of being intolerant of uncertainty. Is it possible to be certain about everything in life? What are the advantages of requiring certainty, versus the disadvantages? Or, how is needing certainty in life helpful and unhelpful? Do you tend to predict bad things will happen just because they are uncertain? Is this a reasonable thing to do? What is the likelihood of positive or neutral outcomes? Is it possible to live with the small chance that something negative may happen, given its likelihood is very low? Adapted from: Accepting Uncertainty, Centre for Clinical Interventions Worry and anxiety self-help tip # 5: Be aware of how others affect you How you feel is affected by the company you keep, whether you’re aware of it or not. Studies show that emotions are contagious. We quickly “catch” moods from other people—even from strangers who never speak a word (e.g. The terrified woman sitting by you on the plane; the fuming man in the checkout line). The people you spend a lot of time with have an even greater impact on your mental state. Keep a worry diary. You may not be aware of how people or situations are affecting you. Maybe this is the way it’s always been in your family, or you’ve been dealing with the stress so long that it feels normal. Try keeping a worry diary for a week or so. Every time you start to worry, jot down the thought and what triggered it. Over time, you’ll start to see patterns. Spend less time with people who make you anxious. Is there someone in your life who drags you down or always seems to leave you feeling stressed? Think about cutting back on the time you spend with that person or establish healthier relationship boundaries. For example, you might set certain topics off-limits, if you know that talking about them with that person makes you anxious. Choose your confidantes carefully. Know who to talk to about situations that make you anxious. Some people will help you gain perspective, while others will feed into your worries, doubts, and fears. Worry and anxiety self-help tip #6: Practice mindfulness Man meditating Worrying is usually focused on the future—on what might happen and what you’ll do about it. The centuries-old practice of mindfulness can help you break free of your worries by bringing your attention back to the present. In contrast to the previous techniques of challenging your anxious thoughts or postponing them to a worry period, this strategy is based on observing and then letting them go. Together, they can help you identify where your thinking is causing problems, while helping you get in touch with your emotions. Acknowledge and observe your anxious thoughts and feelings. Don’t try to ignore, fight, or control them like you usually would. Instead, simply observe them as if from an outsider’s perspective, without reacting or judging. Let your worries go. Notice that when you don’t try to control the anxious thoughts that pop up, they soon pass, like clouds moving across the sky. It’s only when you engage your worries that you get stuck. Stay focused on the present. Pay attention to the way your body feels, the rhythm of your breathing, your ever-changing emotions, and the thoughts that drift across your mind. If you find yourself getting stuck on a particular thought, bring your attention back to the present moment. Using mindfulness meditation to stay focused on the present is a simple concept, but it takes practice to reap the benefits. At first, you’ll probably find that your mind keeps wandering back to your worries. Try not to get frustrated. Each time you draw your focus back to the present, you’re reinforcing a new mental habit that will help you break free of the negative worry cycle. I hope this helps. Take care

I am 54 years old. My son is married but I am feeling loneliness not interested in anything. what should i do?

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician
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I am 54 years old. My son is married but I am feeling loneliness  not interested in anything. what should i do?
This is age related and due to separation from son. You understand that this is normal part of life in all persons and you spend time by reading, books and music, meditaion and yoga. Your menopause also may add to depression. Move with your age group people around your area and find time for some social work. Be positive in life. You can discuss itha gynecologist if you need hormone replacement for depression from menopause.

I am 38 years old. I am suffering from epilepsy when I was 8 years old. I am taking EPTOIN tablets since 8 years. Is there any chance to completely cure.

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist
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When you are seizure free for 2 years, neurologist will do EEG and attempt dose reduction, if epilepsy does not recur, can be stopped, else need to continue.

I am getting sex thoughts every day if I have seen a lady who seems sexy and I am unable to control. Please help.

Reparenting Technique, BA, BEd
Psychologist
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I am getting sex thoughts every day if I have seen a lady who seems sexy and I am unable to control. Please help.
There is no need to be alarmed to this extent. Between the ages of 16 to 18 years, for a duration of almost exactly two years, all boys and girls will have a spurt in the production of the male sex hormone, testosterone. Due to this hormone there are three identified effects, all because of this chemical: you will become sexually active; you will become aggressive and rebellious; and you will all suffer acne and pimple problems. You have no choice because this is a body clock mechanism that gets activated and over the two years that it prevails, it will gradually subside and return to normal. But during this time you could (driven by the hormones) do something inadvertent that there may be no turning the clock back. So you need to exercise control and channelize this energy through games and sports and hobbies. Also you would have developed secondary sexual characteristics and they seek to be used and seek fulfillment. Again this is not a problem but the drive can be very bad for those who do not have sufficiently well developed value systems or a good conscience. These kids can lose control and become reckless. Most kids have a problem, like you do, around their sexual urges and may resort to acting out in the form of masturbation, pornography, and other sexual exploits. If you indulge in any of these you can get into a guilt trip or develop an addiction that may plague you for a long time. There is no threat to your mental well being. Your character will certainly be tested, and it will reflect your development in this regard. The best thing to do is to get a sex education from a counselor and ask all the questions you wish answered. Otherwise you will want to experiment or seek information from your peers who are not adequately qualified to really do justice to your queries.

Hello doctor. I have been married for last 1 and half year. I want to highlight three issues about my wife: 1. Always thinking about the past (we had gone through a bad patch after marriage) and start over reacting. Sometimes it looks like that I am facing two different personalities - one very caring and sweet and other one (after getting angry) is totally opposite, very rude, abusive and dangerous face. This is like the worse situation I face. I got very afraid & don't want to face this situation again and again. 2. Getting bored very frequently with anything. 3. Difficulty in taking decision I love my wife very much and I want to live a happy life with her. Please help

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist
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Hello doctor. I have been married for last 1 and half year. I want to highlight three issues about my wife: 1. Always...
It will be wise for you both to get your personalities assessed. Marriage is an institution, where both the partners need to adjust and change to accommodate others pluses and minuses. Get an appointment fixed with a psychiatrist who does marital counselling or a clinical psychologist who does the same and both of you can reduce the altercations and can be happy most of the times

Respected sir, I am male of 28 years suffering from generalized anxiety disorder since 10 months. But not taking any medicine just relaxing and not thinking much. Will anxiety go away on its own and it's dangerous symptoms like derealisation, depersonalization, shortness of breath, dream like state and brain fog will go away sun or not please let me know as there is no way except keeping patience. Please reply.

M.A-Philosophy, Masters in Psychotherapy and Counselling, B.A.M.S
Psychologist
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Respected sir, I am male of 28 years suffering from generalized anxiety disorder since 10 months. But not taking any ...
Good if you are able to relax there is no need of any treatment you can learn mindfulness meditation for your development.

My son 24 yrs he is by born downsyndrom patient what can I do? any treatment available?

DIABETES MANAGEMENT, MBBS
Geneticist
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Hi There is developmental delay in all spheres (motor, adaptive and social) in children with Down’s syndrome and most common genetic cause of learning disability & mental retardation. As there is no curative therapy, counseling has a central role to play in the management. Having Down's syndrome child can be challenging at times. But with help professional support, most people are able to have healthy, active and more independent lives. There are many children who have done wonders and hence take it as chanllenge and support your kid to develop and learn.

I am taking clonazepam .25 mg twice daily from last two week for anxiety, how long I can continue this medicine.

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist
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I am taking clonazepam .25 mg twice daily from last two week for anxiety, how long I can continue this medicine.
2 weeks maximum, clonazepam is used for acute anxiety, if longer/ chronic anxiety needs to be treated there are other medicines.

Hi sir I am from india. I had stones in my kidney nd ureter. 16mm in ureter which was removed recently 20 day back with the help of laser lithotripsy. But 3 mm nd 4mm stones are still in kidney. This is the second time I had taken laser lithotripsy. 4 years before done the same procedure as had stone in my ureter. My age is 25. I am totally feared sir would you pls suggest me. To stop this stone formation plzzzzz. Hoping the best regards.

MSC Human Development , Hypnotherapy , Special Educator , ms- counselling and physiotherapy, Applied psychology Hons
Psychologist
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Hi sir I am from india. I had stones in my kidney nd ureter. 16mm in ureter which was removed recently 20 day back wi...
You have to drink a plenty of water or other fluid. The quantity should always more than two litre of water you intake. Only this will help you to stop this stone formation. Or you can take suggestion from a normal physician that what you have to stop or eat in small quantity. There are many vegetables which increase the percentage of formation of stone in every person. Drink water as much you can only it will help you remove those particals through urine which can be make stone in your body.

Depression in Children

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist
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Depression might be the cause poor academic in childhood.
Depression in Children

How long does it takes to recover from anorexia nervosa? I really want help, and I do not want to look pale or yellowish. Can anyone please tell about the correct diet chart and weight according to my age, i.e. 21 yrs. And how much time it take to recover, and suggestions for the recovery.

Diploma in Diet and Nutrition
Dietitian/Nutritionist
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How long does it takes to recover from anorexia nervosa? I really want help, and I do not want to look pale or yellow...
Hi It requires a lot of courage to accept that something has gone off-track. Appreciate yourself for taking this step. You have already started your recovery. Don't worry about time. Slow and steady wins the health race. Its good to take help of people whom you trust. You can also continue to search for online forums where you can find support for recovery... You can also try these steps. 1. Accept yourself the way you are. 2. A person is more than his looks and weight. Focus on your inner self. 3. Focus on your good qualities. 4. Focus on your work and studies. 5. Try to pick / follow a hobby. 6. Listen to music you like. 7. Read books you like. 8. Eat small portions of food you like. Try to balance carbs/fats/proteins. 9. Do breathing exercises. 10. Try meditation. You can try Minda.lee.kumar videos on youtube. 11. Continue your journey towards health step by step. 12. Believe that you will achieve better health. Never give up.

What You Need to Know About Borderline Personality Disorder

DNB (Psychiatry), DPM, MBBS
Psychiatrist
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Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is such a disorder of personality that causes mood swings, self-esteem issues, impulsive behavior and recurrent self-harm behaviour. It is very difficult to lead a normal life with these varied psychological issues.

People suffering from BPD fear abandonment and loneliness. Yet, they have a tendency of showing mood swings, sudden emotional outburst or anger and hostility. This prevents them from having a long lasting relationship in life. It usually starts affecting the patient's life from early adulthood. It however seems to improve with age. The patient also has distorted self-image. He or she is unclear about what they want from life or what they are in reality. Even minor incidents can trigger intense reactions in people with BPD.

Symptoms of BPD

1. Disturbed self-image - People have self-esteem issues, they sometimes love or hate themselves or see themselves as evil. They have unclear goals, views, beliefs and often end up changing their friends, lovers, jobs, sexual identity frequently.

2. Emotional instability: Intense feelings of rage, sorrow, anger, guilt and emptiness or loneliness are experienced by some sufferers of BPD. Extreme mood swings, lasting for a short span of time, are common in BPD. They may also have issues with their self-image where they cannot place themselves and don't know what they feel about themselves or who they are.

3. Dysfunctional relationships: It is very difficult to maintain a normal relationship for people with personality disorder. They tend to have quick short-lived relationships and get put off very easily which leads to a lot of heartbreak. Suicidal tendencies and frequent self-harm behaviour like cutting skin using blades/ sharp objects are common. Drugs and alcohol abuse, eating disorders and sexual promiscuity are other forms of self-destructive behaviour commonly encountered in this population. Extreme aggression, delusions, transitional Psychotic states are other possible symptoms of BPD.

Causes for BPD:

1. Usually it has been found by researchers that it occurs to patients who have had a disturbed childhood. Complex and unpleasant happenings in the childhood may leave a deep impact on the patient's personality, which comes back as a disorder in his or her early adulthood. From mental, physical to sexual abuse in the childhood can lead to this condition in adults.

2. Besides, researchers have discovered recently that this illness has hereditary links. Some genes may be responsible for BPD. Improper functioning of the brain is also another factor. Especially, the portion of brain that controls emotions might not be functioning properly in co-ordination with other parts of it.

Diagnosis for BPD

There is no particular clinical test that can diagnose BPD. It can be diagnosed by a series of interactive session with the patient by a psychiatrist.

Love and support from family and friends are crucial for patients suffering from this disease. Prolonged counseling sessions, therapies and the effort to break away from the chronic gloomy thoughts will definitely lead one to a better life.
What You Need to Know About Borderline Personality Disorder

I am a 40 year old and having problem of pulling my mustach with my fingers unknowningly and my mush became thin. How to avoid pulling mushtach knowingly unknoingly, so that I can grow mush as per my wife's wish.

M.Phil clinical Psychology, MS Psychotherapy and Counseling, PGDGC, MSc Psychology
Psychologist
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Check whether its a mannerism you have developed which manifests your anxiety or just a habituated behavior while involving in some activities which are interesting or the ones which involve a deep thinking process. If so remind yourselves before you start any such activity that you should be careful not to do it. There is also a possibility that you are suffering from trichotillomania for which seek the help of a clinical psychologist.

Dear professionals I am suffering from phobia and panic about urine while going out traveling in bus and more and stage fear also is there please help me only I want allopath professionals.

CCEBDM, PG Diploma In Clinical cardiology, MBBS
Cardiologist
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Dear professionals I am suffering from phobia and panic about urine while going out traveling in bus and more and sta...
Built confidence. Do more interaction with friends. Relatives and colleagues do 1.no alcohol 2. Reduce body wt 3. No smoking/ tobacco 4. Diet - no ghee/ butter, have mix of vegetable oils - mustard, til, ground nut, olive oil, have more green vegetables and fruits, have whole grain atta, no fried. Fast. Spicy / processed/ junk food. Less sugar, potato, rice 5. 30 mts brisk walk daily 6. Deep breathing exercise for 10 mts daily 7. Meditation daily for 10 mts. 6-8 hrs of sleep at night 8. Expose your body to sun for 15-20 mts daily after some oil massage to get vit d. 9. Take more water you need med, for medicine contact on private chat. Good luck.

Hello sir I want to know more about stuttering and stammering fear at the time of interview?

MD
Psychiatrist
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Stuttering and stammering both are different conditions related to speech. Meet one speech therapist to resolve it. And fear at the time of interview may be due to few others conditions like performance anxiety or social phobia.

I lost my mom 2 years back I always feel very low in sad times and usually for 2-3 hours a day what should you do to move on successfully and be redirect myself to the future success.

MSC Human Development , Hypnotherapy , Special Educator , ms- counselling and physiotherapy, Applied psychology Hons
Psychologist
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I lost my mom 2 years back I always feel very low in sad times and usually for 2-3 hours a day what should you do to ...
As you love your mom and your mom was not happy to see you like this. Every body has faces this kind of time. Be strong and do some relaxation exercise for keep you relax. Always be positive for any situation of life. Look forward you have a whole life. Live it positively. Take help of any psychologist near by you. If you want to take our help you can contact us.
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