Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}
Call Doctor
Book Appointment

Dr. Mukul Bhardwaj

General Physician, Aligarh

100 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Dr. Mukul Bhardwaj General Physician, Aligarh
100 at clinic
Book Appointment
Call Doctor
Submit Feedback
Report Issue
Get Help
Services
Feed

Personal Statement

I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning....more
I pride myself in attending local and statewide seminars to stay current with the latest techniques, and treatment planning.
More about Dr. Mukul Bhardwaj
Dr. Mukul Bhardwaj is an experienced General Physician in Prince Nagar, Aligarh. He is currently practising at mukul bhardwaj in Prince Nagar, Aligarh. Save your time and book an appointment online with Dr. Mukul Bhardwaj on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has top trusted General Physicians from across India. You will find General Physicians with more than 41 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find General Physicians online in Aligarh and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

Info

Languages spoken
English
Hindi
Professional Memberships
IMA

Location

Book Clinic Appointment with Dr. Mukul Bhardwaj

mukul bhardwaj

56,pratibha colony banna devi thana aligarhAligarh Get Directions
100 at clinic
...more
View All

Services

Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
Get Cost Estimate
View All Services

Submit Feedback

Submit a review for Dr. Mukul Bhardwaj

Your feedback matters!
Write a Review

Patient Review Highlights

"Very helpful" 1 review

Feed

Nothing posted by this doctor yet. Here are some posts by similar doctors.

I'm 32 years old. I'm suffering from sinusitis last from 4 yrs. I have ear problems with this sinusitis. From last 1 years I have some sounds ringing continuously. So I ask you Sir please suggest ayurvedic medicine. Can I take Himalaya septilin. How much time? How much Dose? Sir please give answer.

(BAMS)
Ayurveda, Indore
Hello To cure sinusitis you should go for a proper treatment. Ear problem is a complication of sinusitis which leads to many more problem like eye ache, head ache and other ENT disorders, to prevent from them you should take a proper treatment for the disease and be healthy. Contact us Preventous Ayurveda
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Drinking water in plastic bottles is harmful. Then what about Kent, puri filters which are made of plastic and water stored in it for more than hours. Kindly suggest.

PGD In Ultraasonography, Non Invasive Cardiology Course, MD - Medicine, MBBS
General Physician, Narnaul
Drinking water in plastic bottles is harmful.
Then what about Kent, puri filters which are made of plastic and water ...
Probably. But it depends on the type of plastic the bottle is made from. And in an effort to be more healthy, many of us make a point of carrying water bottles with us everywhere we go. But are our water bottles a health issue? Especially those made from plastic? Generally they are safe, says Michael Moore, Emeritus Professor of Toxicology at the University of Queensland, but it depends on the kind of plastic the bottle is made of. Most plastics are made of long chains of hydrocarbon molecules, built from simpler building blocks called monomers. Some plastics then have chemicals added to give them a characteristic such as flexibility or colour. Buying bottled water The 'single use' water bottles that you typically buy at milk bars, service stations and the like are usually made from polyethylene terephthalate (abbreviated to PET or PETE), an inexpensive and lightweight plastic. Its recycling code (the number in the centre of the triangle of arrows found on most plastics) is 1. "PET is not one of the plastics that one would think has a propensity to cause a problem, says Moore. Moore agrees with the US FDA, which says that PET bottles are safe for use and reuse so long as they are washed properly with detergent and water to remove bacteria. The safety of using PET bottles was questioned after a student research project hit the headlines. The 2001 study found traces of a phthalate — a potentially harmful 'plasticiser' used to make some plastics more flexible — in water from PET bottles, but the research hadn't been verified. Moore says PET has never contained phthalates and the public's association between the two could be based on the plastic's name. And while some preliminary studies have suggested water from PET bottles can contain as-yet-unidentified substances with 'oestrogenic' properties (which disrupt the body's normal hormone regulation), Moore says no rigorous scientific review has backed these. A substance called antimony is used in PET production and it can leach into the water in PET bottles. However, this doesn't pose much of a risk, says Moore. "Antimony is not in the same league as lead or mercury toxicologically so the likelihood of harm is low, says Moore. Using your own bottle But what if you've decided not to buy bottled water, but to use a refillable water bottle to cut down on the plastic sent to landfill? Polycarbonate has been commonly used to make the sturdy reusable water bottles that many of us use. Polycarbonate is one of the plastics classed as 'other' in the recycling scheme. It has a recycling code of 7, but not all bottles stamped with a 7 are made from polycarbonate. Polycarbonate is made of a monomer called bisphenol A (BPA). As the plastic breaks down over time, BPA is released into the water held in polycarbonate bottles, particularly when the bottle is heated or repeatedly washed. "If you have a bottle made of polycarbonate, on first use there probably isn't much depolymerisation but as you use it again and again — especially if things are warm or hot — then there's a high likelihood that there will be a breakdown of the plastic to release the monomer, says Moore. But just because there is some BPA in the water, it doesn't necessarily mean it's dangerous, says Moore. Research in animals has found BPA can cause a range of conditions — such as cancer, diabetes, obesity and reproductive and developmental disorders. Some studies suggest that young animals metabolise BPA less efficiently than adults. "But there's nothing much in the way of identified effects in humans — virtually all of the effects have been established in relatively higher levels of exposure in animal models. The level of exposure is probably not sufficient to cause these effects [in people]. But people who are feeding young children are saying 'I'd rather not take the chance' which is fair enough. It's likely that soon we won't need to make these choices ourselves, says Moore. Even though most national food safety agencies, including Australia's FSANZ, say that the level of exposure to BPA is too low to be dangerous, food and drink companies are moving away from polycarbonate because of the bad press. However, other agencies, such as the US National Toxicology Program, are worried enough to be carrying out reviews and the World Health Organisation is holding a meeting next month to review all the scientific evidence. "There is a lot of ongoing work to look at the effects of this compound to see whether this genuinely represents a big issue. The position at present is that it doesn't constitute a huge issue, says Moore. "In effect I would expect that in the very near future various agencies will make changes to the tolerable daily intake of BPA, he adds. The internationally agreed Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) for BPA is currently 0.05 mg per kilogram of body weight per day. One plastic that can be undoubtedly dangerous for making water bottles is polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which has a recycling code of 3. PVC often has phthalates added to make it flexible — though you can't tell this by looking at the recycling code. Thankfully, PVC is not often used to make water bottles. Choosing a bottle If you want to err on the side of caution, Moore suggests you avoid drinks bottles that have the recycling codes of 3 or 7, particularly for children. The best bottles to use and reuse are those with the recycling codes 2, 4 and 5. 2 and 4 are made from polyethylene and 5 is made from polypropylene. "There's absolutely nothing in polyethylene or polypropylene that could be classified as dangerous" says Moore. But these bottles are more expensive to make, so while they are likely to be found more and more in reusable bottles, PET is likely to be the plastic of choice for single-use bottles for a while to come. You can also check that reusuable bottles say they are 'BPA-free' as some bottles may be made of number 5 plastic but use polycarbonate linings or mouthpieces. Another rule of thumb is to use clear plastic rather than coloured or opaque because they eliminate small potential risks from colouring agents added to the plastic, says Moore. And while stainless steel or aluminium bottles are often considered a safe bet, these still have some issues, says Moore. Stainless steel can corrode a little over time and while the released iron won't harm you, it'll add an unpleasant taste to your water. Aluminium can also corrode and release aluminium salts into the water. One way of stopping this is to use a plastic liner, which takes you to square one. Glass is a good, but often impractical. "In the end you've got to balance all the issues. I would think that many bottles are safe to use, even PET ones. The only one I would advise against are PVC and polycarbonate, concludes Moore. And in an effort to be more healthy, many of us make a point of carrying water bottles with us everywhere we go. But are our water bottles a health issue? Especially those made from plastic? Generally they are safe, says Michael Moore, Emeritus Professor of Toxicology at the University of Queensland, but it depends on the kind of plastic the bottle is made of. Most plastics are made of long chains of hydrocarbon molecules, built from simpler building blocks called monomers. Some plastics then have chemicals added to give them a characteristic such as flexibility or colour. Buying bottled water The 'single use' water bottles that you typically buy at milk bars, service stations and the like are usually made from polyethylene terephthalate (abbreviated to PET or PETE), an inexpensive and lightweight plastic. Its recycling code (the number in the centre of the triangle of arrows found on most plastics) is 1. "PET is not one of the plastics that one would think has a propensity to cause a problem, says Moore. Moore agrees with the US FDA, which says that PET bottles are safe for use and reuse so long as they are washed properly with detergent and water to remove bacteria. The safety of using PET bottles was questioned after a student research project hit the headlines. The 2001 study found traces of a phthalate — a potentially harmful 'plasticiser' used to make some plastics more flexible — in water from PET bottles, but the research hadn't been verified. Moore says PET has never contained phthalates and the public's association between the two could be based on the plastic's name. And while some preliminary studies have suggested water from PET bottles can contain as-yet-unidentified substances with 'oestrogenic' properties (which disrupt the body's normal hormone regulation), Moore says no rigorous scientific review has backed these. A substance called antimony is used in PET production and it can leach into the water in PET bottles. However, this doesn't pose much of a risk, says Moore. "Antimony is not in the same league as lead or mercury toxicologically so the likelihood of harm is low, says Moore. Using your own bottle But what if you've decided not to buy bottled water, but to use a refillable water bottle to cut down on the plastic sent to landfill? Polycarbonate has been commonly used to make the sturdy reusable water bottles that many of us use. Polycarbonate is one of the plastics classed as 'other' in the recycling scheme. It has a recycling code of 7, but not all bottles stamped with a 7 are made from polycarbonate. Polycarbonate is made of a monomer called bisphenol A (BPA). As the plastic breaks down over time, BPA is released into the water held in polycarbonate bottles, particularly when the bottle is heated or repeatedly washed. "If you have a bottle made of polycarbonate, on first use there probably isn't much depolymerisation but as you use it again and again — especially if things are warm or hot — then there's a high likelihood that there will be a breakdown of the plastic to release the monomer, says Moore. But just because there is some BPA in the water, it doesn't necessarily mean it's dangerous, says Moore. Research in animals has found BPA can cause a range of conditions — such as cancer, diabetes, obesity and reproductive and developmental disorders. Some studies suggest that young animals metabolise BPA less efficiently than adults. "But there's nothing much in the way of identified effects in humans — virtually all of the effects have been established in relatively higher levels of exposure in animal models. The level of exposure is probably not sufficient to cause these effects [in people]. But people who are feeding young children are saying 'I'd rather not take the chance' which is fair enough. It's likely that soon we won't need to make these choices ourselves, says Moore. Even though most national food safety agencies, including Australia's FSANZ, say that the level of exposure to BPA is too low to be dangerous, food and drink companies are moving away from polycarbonate because of the bad press. However, other agencies, such as the US National Toxicology Program, are worried enough to be carrying out reviews and the World Health Organisation is holding a meeting next month to review all the scientific evidence. "There is a lot of ongoing work to look at the effects of this compound to see whether this genuinely represents a big issue. The position at present is that it doesn't constitute a huge issue, says Moore. "In effect I would expect that in the very near future various agencies will make changes to the tolerable daily intake of BPA, he adds. The internationally agreed Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) for BPA is currently 0.05 mg per kilogram of body weight per day. One plastic that can be undoubtedly dangerous for making water bottles is polyvinyl chloride (PVC), which has a recycling code of 3. PVC often has phthalates added to make it flexible — though you can't tell this by looking at the recycling code. Thankfully, PVC is not often used to make water bottles. Choosing a bottle If you want to err on the side of caution, Moore suggests you avoid drinks bottles that have the recycling codes of 3 or 7, particularly for children. The best bottles to use and reuse are those with the recycling codes 2, 4 and 5. 2 and 4 are made from polyethylene and 5 is made from polypropylene. "There's absolutely nothing in polyethylene or polypropylene that could be classified as dangerous" says Moore. But these bottles are more expensive to make, so while they are likely to be found more and more in reusable bottles, PET is likely to be the plastic of choice for single-use bottles for a while to come. You can also check that reusuable bottles say they are 'BPA-free' as some bottles may be made of number 5 plastic but use polycarbonate linings or mouthpieces. Another rule of thumb is to use clear plastic rather than coloured or opaque because they eliminate small potential risks from colouring agents added to the plastic, says Moore. And while stainless steel or aluminium bottles are often considered a safe bet, these still have some issues, says Moore. Stainless steel can corrode a little over time and while the released iron won't harm you, it'll add an unpleasant taste to your water. Aluminium can also corrode and release aluminium salts into the water. One way of stopping this is to use a plastic liner, which takes you to square one. Glass is a good, but often impractical. "In the end you've got to balance all the issues. I would think that many bottles are safe to use, even PET ones. The only one I would advise against are PVC and polycarbonate, concludes Moore. The Best Water Filter Options What’s In Your Water? If you are drinking tap water, the answer to that question is 300+ chemicals and pollutants, according to research from the Environmental Working Group. Among these contaminants are: Volatile Organic Chemicals (VOCs) such as pesticides, herbicides and other chemicals. These chemicals are found in most municipal water sources and even in well and other sources due to agricultural run-off and contamination. Research links certain VOCs to damage in the reproductive system, liver, kidneys and more. Heavy Metals like lead and mercury are found in some water sources and have been linked to any health problems. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals are chemicals that may mimic or interfere with the normal hormones in the body and these chemicals are being found in increasing amounts in the water supply. From this testimony before a congressional committee on the issue: “Over the past fifty years, researchers observed increases in endocrine-sensitive health outcomes. Breast and prostatic cancer incidence increased between 1969 and 1986 ; there was a four-fold increase in ectopic pregnancies (development of the fertilized egg outside of the uterus) in the U.S. Between 1970 and 1987 ; the incidence of cryptorchidism (undescended testicles) doubled in the U.K. Between 1960 and the mid 1980s ; and there was an approximately 42% decrease in sperm count worldwide between 1940 and 1990 .” These chemicals are known to affect animals when they enter the water supply as well. Fluoride: This is perhaps the most controversial of the contaminants in water (if something like water contaminants can be controversial!) because it is purposefully added to the water and there is much heated debate about the benefits/harm of this. Anyone who listened to the Heal Thy Mouth Summit is well aware of the potential dangers of Fluoride thanks to Dr. Kennedy, but the short is: If fluoride has any benefit, it would be directly to the teeth, as drinking the fluoride has not been statistically shown to increase oral health at all. Additionally, fluoride has been linked to thyroid problems and other disorders when consumed internally. So what are the options for those of us not interested in drinking a chemical cocktail every time we are thirsty? Bottled Water: Bottled water has started falling out of favor lately and with good reason. Mark’s Daily Apple did an in-depth analysis of why, but bottled water is not a good option for several reasons: Chemicals from the plastic bottle itself can leech into the water In most cases, the water itself is no different than tap water Bottled water costs more in many cases that drinking tap water Water bottles are a major source of consumer waste each year! Verdict: Not the best option on price, taste, or health so I skip it. That being said, having a bottle of water is very convenient, and there are some great sustainable options. Glass and steel water bottles are my personal favorites! Pitcher Water Filters Pitcher water filters like Brita use Granulated Activated Charcoal to remove some contaminants. They are less expensive than other filter options upfront, but require frequent filling (especially for large families) and cartridge replacement (making them more expensive in the long run). Since the carbon is not solid, it does not remove all toxins though these filters will improve taste. Pitcher filters will reduce chlorine, but are not effective at removing VOCs, heavy metals, endocrine disruptors or fluoride. This category also includes faucet mount external filters, which use the same technology. Verdict: Better than nothing, but doesn’t remove the worst offenders and is somewhat costly to use compared to other options. Reverse Osmosis (RO) Reverse Osmosis filtration uses a membrane which removes many contaminants from water. It is usually paired with a Granulated Activated Charcoal filter to remove chlorine and many mount under the sink and have a holding tank. The semipermeable membrane separates many contaminates (which usually have a larger particle size that water) from the water and rejects a large amount of water in the process. The result is a waste of several gallons of water for every gallon filtered and many naturally occurring minerals (including calcium and magnesium) are also removed from the water. We used this type of filter for a long time but added trace minerals back in to the water to replace the ones that are filtered out. It does remove a large amount of contaminants but is not the best option, in my opinion. Pros: Removes a large amount of contaminants. Many unites are stored under the sink and have a simple spigot over the counter for getting the water. Does reduce arsenic, asbestos and heavy metals. Does remove fluoride. Cons: Wastes more water than it produces. Does not reduce VOCs or endocrine disruptors. Requires adequate water pressure to work so it is not usable if home water supply is cut off. Takes up to an hour to filter one gallon of water and filters need to be replaced regularly. Removes necessary minerals from the water. Verdict: Certainly better than a lot of options out there and does remove fluoride, but not the best due to its waste of water and costly filters. Distilled Water The distillation process uses heat to cause the water to become steam. The steam rises and moves to a cooling chamber where it turns back into liquid, leaving behind many contaminants. This type of filtration reduces large particles like minerals and heavy metals but does not remove endocrine disruptors or VOCs since they vaporize at equal or lower temps that water and rise with the steam. It does effectively kill bacteria. Pros: Removes a large amount of contaminants. Does reduce arsenic, asbestos and heavy metals. Does remove fluoride. Cons: Does not reduce VOCs or endocrine disruptors. Home distillation systems are often large and expensive. Use a large amount of electricity and will not work in power outages. Removes necessary minerals from the water. Long term use can cause mineral deficiencies. Verdict: Better than bottled water, but definitely not the best option out there, especially for home situations. Solid Block Carbon Filters Recognized by the EPA as the best option for removing chemicals like herbicides, pesticides and VOCs. Quality carbon block filters will remove chemicals, pesticides, bacteria, fluoride (with filter attachment), heavy metals, nitrate, nitrites and parasites. Most are gravity based and can safely transform any type of water into safe drinking water including rain water, pond water and even sea water (though these types of water will clog the filters much more quickly and are not ideal!) It will even filter water with food coloring to create clear water (yes, I tested it…) This is the option that we use now and my only complaint is that it does take up counter space. The advantages are that it is gravity based and will work even without electricity or running water. While these types of units can be more pricey that pitcher filters or other filters up front, they seem to be the least expensive in the long run and require the fewest filter replacements (a big plus for me!). These types of filters also don’t remove naturally occurring minerals from the water, making it the best tasting filtered water option, in my opinion. Using a filter calculator, I’ve determined that the specific system we use won’t need to be replaced for over 20 years with our current usage (though I’m guessing our usage will increase as the kids get older). The most common type of this filter is the Berkey and it comes in many sizes for different uses. It can even be used camping to filter river water for drinking! (Tested this too and it saved one of my brother in-laws from Giardia when other members of his group got it while camping) Pros: Filters VOCs, heavy metals, chlorine, fluoride, nitrates/ites, bacteria, parasites and other chemicals. Very inexpensive per gallon cost and infrequent filter replacement. Great tasting water. Doesn’t require electricity or water pressure to work. Portable options can even be used while traveling. Cons: Does require counter space and does have to be manually filled (not a big deal for us, we just fill at night and we have plenty of water the next day). More expensive up front. Does not remove endocrine disruptors and there are some concerns with third party testing with some brands. Verdict: A good option, especially in places where under-counter or permanent systems are not an option. We uses this one for years before our current system. Under Counter Multi-Stage Filters: After years of research and trying most of the options above at some point, we finally found and switched to an under-counter multi-stage water filter system that meets all of the criteria and exceeds them. I review the one we personally use in depth in this post, but in short, it filters water through a 14-stage process that utilizes most of the methods listed above, along with others like UV and adds minerals back in. During the filtration process, water goes through these stages: Stage 1 – Five Micron Pre-Filter Stage 2 – Internal Coconut Shell Carbon Filter (like Berkey) Stage 3 – Reverse Osmosis Membrane (Purifier #1) (like regular RO but more efficient) Stage 4 – Mixed Bed De-Ionization Purifier (Purifier #2) Stage 5 – Mixed Bed De-Ionization Purifier (Purifier #3) Stages 6 & 7 – Homeopathic Restructuring – Erasing Memory, Molecule Coherence Stage 8 – Holding Tank – standard tank holds about 3 gallons of pure water. Other tanks are available. Stage 9 – Ultraviolet Light – 14 Watt Stage 10 – Reprogramming – Adding Natural Mineral Properties Stages 11-12 – Far-Infrared Reprogramming Stage 13 – Coconut Shell Carbon Post-Filtration Stage 14 – Alka-Min (Alkalizing, Ionic Remineralization) It removes fluoride, lead, chlorine, MTBE, chromium-6, nitrates, pesticides, pharmaceutical residues, water-borne illness and more. We absolutely love this water filter and I’ve recommended it to my own family members. Pros: Removes the widest range of contaminants. Very easy to use with no manual filling required. Spigot attaches near sink for easy use. Water tastes great. Cons: Must be installed under the sink. We had to hire a plumber for this, though we probably could have figured it out ourselves, I was just reluctant to try. Verdict: The best option I’ve found and the one we currently use.
8 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

When i am having sex my sperm comes out with in less time i am not able to sex the girl for 5 minutes even, I'll do hand job for my pennies everyday 1 or 2.

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Chennai
When i am having sex my sperm comes out with in less time i am not able to sex the girl for 5 minutes even, I'll do h...
5 mins is fine, less than 2 mins is Premature ejaculation. So dont worry, with some techniques u can extend the time
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi I am a diabetic n under insulin control. I have tried all medics but right now I am under ayurvedic treatment yielding no results. Kindly help me sort out my PE problem which is destroying my married life.

BHMS, MD - Homoeopathy
Homeopath, Lucknow
Hi I am a diabetic n under insulin control. I have tried all medics but right now I am under ayurvedic treatment yiel...
Lybrate-user for diabetes first of all you should have to take a restricted diet of diabetes and this is not a disease which can be so easy to cure. But yes homoeopathy has answer to this disease and can manage it very well without any side-effects.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 42 years old with diabetes and blood pressure. Recently I have developed bloating of the stomach. I feel heavy in the empty stomach. I am getting rashes in the skin too. Please suggest me a remedy naturally. What diet should I follow. What are natural probiotic so. Please help me with the answers.

MD- Homoeopathy
Homeopath,
I am 42 years old with diabetes and blood pressure. Recently I have developed bloating of the stomach. I feel heavy i...
This common ailment often happens because you swallow more air than usual, overeat, smoke, chew gum, or eat foods that cause gas. Flatulence can be embarrassing and painful for anyone, but don’t worry You easily reduce flatulence with diet and lifestyle choices. Have smaller meals throughout the day. Eat six small meals per day instead of three large meals. Your system may more easily digest fewer meals and produce less gas from them Eat easily digestible carbs. Foods that contain simple carbohydrates may be easier for you to digest Avoid gas-promoting foods. Plan your meals each day to include easily digestible carbs. Steer clear of food choices that may make create gas in your intestines. Find suitable replacements for the following gas-promoting foods Beans and lentils. Cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts. Bran. Dairy products containing lactose. Fruit such as apples and pears. Sorbitol, a sugar substitute found in some sugar-free products. Fatty junk foods, like fast food burgers or pizza. Chew your meal slowly. If you're famished or you're a fast eater, avoid the temptation to shovel your food into your mouth. Chew each meal slowly so you don’t swallow too much air. Doing this can aid digestion and may minimize the production of gas. Get regular exercise. Physical activity can help your intestines expel gas and stay regular. Exercise for at least 30 minutes most days of the week. If you are unable to do 30 minutes, aim for 2 15-minute sessions of physical movement, which can also ease flatulence. Try different kinds of exercise to prevent flatulence: Running Walking Biking Swimming Yoga For medication consult online in private.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi, I am 28 years female. I had pain in my upper back and upper stomach pain in mild. I have done ultrasound scan. It's normal only but sometimes have a pain but my weight is not decreased eating good and urine motion are normal. What is the reason for pain?

MPT, BPT
Physiotherapist, Noida
Hi, I am 28 years female. I had pain in my upper back and upper stomach pain in mild. I have done ultrasound scan. It...
Postural Correction- Sit Tall, Walk Tall. Extension Exercises x 15 times x twice daily. Apply Hot Fomentation twice daily. Avoid bending in front.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi, I'm suffering from bloating and I'm not able to understand how it happened everything was running good. Since last 3 to 4 days it's happening with me and specially after lunch difficult sit because my stomach sounds like a diesel engine in every 5 to minutes. I don't eat too much and eat slowly and do daily 15 minutes exercise. Pls help me what can I do for this it's seriously awkward in office.

BAMS
Ayurveda, Bangalore
Hi, I'm suffering from bloating and I'm not able to understand how it happened everything was running good. Since las...
Hi, Take tab. Gasex 2-0-2 after food and tab. Avipattikara 1-1-1 for 10 - 15 days. Do not keep the stomach for long hours. Avoid spicy and oily food. Drink 2-3 litres of water per day. Walk for 30 mins daily. Take Himcocid Syrup 2 tsf 3 times a day 15 mins before food to relieve belching.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Hi, I was second day on my periods, and my bf fingered me after touching his erected penis, after that we used condoms and just one time he touched penis without condom on extreme upper part. Is their ant chance of pregnancy. Their was no sexual intercourse no ejaculation on me or anything?

BHMS
Sexologist, Mumbai
There are no chances of pregnancy as 1 week after periods is infertile. Learn to count fertile days by calender method if cycles r regular to avoid unwanted worries. Learn different ways of enjoying sex other than penetration for full satisfaction.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Preventing a Sore Penis

MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi

Preventing a Sore Penis: Tips

When a guy's penis feels good, sex feels good - whether it's sex with a partner or with himself. (That's one of the primary reasons why men make it a habit of keeping an eye on their penis health.) But when a man has a sore penis, it can have a big impact on sex. Sometimes it makes it far less pleasurable; other times that sore penis may keep a guy from having sex altogether - and no man likes that, especially when the sexual urge is strong within him. Still, the occasional sore penis is a fact of life for just about every man, so let's investigate a few tips to help prevent or treat a sore penis.

Tips

- Don't be afraid of lubrication. One of the most common causes of a sore penis is rawness due to friction, and that tends to result from engaging in sex - partner-based or solo - without sufficient lubrication. Yes, the penis does tend to produce pre-seminal fluid which provides some lubrication, and yes, a woman's body also creates natural lubricants. But in many cases, this is not sufficient to the task at hand. Some men (and women) feel embarrassed at needing to use a lubricant, but doing so can play a big role in preventing a sore penis.

- Reapply the lubricant. Some guys are good at using an initial dose of lubricant, but then don't reapply it if it gets worn off. Granted, it's not so romantic to stop some great sex to withdraw the member and re-lubricate it; but doing so pays off in the long run. And if a guy is engaging in very length sex - and especially masturbating for an extended period of time - reapplication is key.

- Engage in foreplay. One reason some couples need to utilize lubricant is because they skimp on the foreplay, which thus impairs their bodies' ability to produce their own lubricants. Spending some extra time on foreplay can in many cases negate the need for additional lubrication.

- Use a well-fitting condom. A condom that fits correctly is important for several reasons; one of them is that it can contribute to penile soreness, especially if it is too tight. In addition, condom use greatly decreases the chances of getting a sexually-transmitted infection, which can in turn cause a seriously sore penis.

- Relax the grip. One of the most valuable tips for masturbation: Don't use a grip that is too tight for too long. This can create a friction situation that rubs the penis raw, leading both to soreness and to a loss of sensitivity in the penis, which no guy wants.

- Switch things up. For those men whose sexual escapades continue at length, it often helps to switch positions once or twice. Trying a new position means that different parts of the penis will receive stimulation, and this may help prevent the over-stimulation that can lead to a sore penis.

- Communicate. Often a partner may be making moves or otherwise handling the penis in an undesirable way. It pays to speak up about what doesn't feel good - and what does - so the partner can make changes as necessary.

These tips can help prevent a sore penis, but what happens if a guy gets soreness anyway? Assuming the cause is related to basic overuse, application of a first rate penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) can be beneficial. Overworked penis skin needs to be remoisturized, so the ideal crème will contain two moisturizing agents, such as Shea butter (an acclaimed emollient) and vitamin E (one of nature's best hydrators). The skin also needs to be strengthened, which a crème with a powerful antioxidant, such as alpha lipoic acid, can supply. The antioxidant will attack excess free radicals that can cause oxidative stress.

2 people found this helpful

My head and my leg is big pain please solve my problem please give me any solution I am very hard pain.

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Delhi
My head and my leg is big pain please solve my problem please give me any solution I am very hard pain.
This treatment is being suggested on bases of the information provided. I would like to examine & investigate you in detail. Any way it may be tried, --. Dolokind Plus (Mankind) [Aceclofenac 100 mg +Paracetamol 350 mg 1 tab. OD & SOS. X 5 days. --. Caldikind plus (Mankind) 1 tab OD x 10 days. (You may need help of your local doctor to get these medicines.)--. Fomentation with warm water. Avoid direct flow of AC or Cooler. --. Sleep on a hard bed with soft bedding. --. Use no pillow under the head. --. Avoid painful acts & activities. -- .Do mild exercises for Neck & shoulders. Knee & Legs Do not ignore, let it not become beginning of a major problem. Do ask for a detailed treatment plan. If no relief in 2-3 days, contact me again (through this platform only) Kindly make sure, there is no allergy to any of these medicines. (Contact your family doctor, if needed). For emergency treatment visit nearest hospital. I hope, I have solved your problem to your satisfaction. Kindly rate the answer.Wish you a quick recovery & good health.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback
View All Feed