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Excess of Vitamin B12 - Can It Cause Acne?

Dr.Arshi Rahul 86% (51ratings)
Diploma In Skin Aesthetics, BHMS, Certificate Course in Skin & Vinereal Disease
Dermatologist, Pune
Excess of Vitamin B12 - Can It Cause Acne?

Is Vitamin B12 Causing Your Acne?
It’s a common belief that vitamins are essential for glowing skin and shiny hairs. But are you aware that excess of vitamin B12 can trigger acne breakouts and leave you with a dull skin? Well, you have read it correctly. Recent studies have revealed that too much vitamin B12 can worsen acne. To get a better understanding of the matter, it is best to know more about vitamin B12.

What Is Vitamin B12?
It is one of the most complex vitamins. It has a very complicated chemical structure. It has an organic molecule, surrounding an atom of cobalt. Our body can use three types of vitamin B12. These types are known as cobalamin. We are also prescribed vitamin B12 supplements sometimes by the doctor. These supplements contain Cyanocobalamin, which is easily converted into methylcobalamin and 5-deoxyadenosyl cobalamin in the body. Our body needs vitamin B12 to produce certain enzymes, which are needed for making a detoxifying a substance called homocysteine and haemoglobin production.

Why is vitamin B12 essential for us?
Vitamin B12 is needed for the good health of the cardiovascular and nervous system. It promotes the production of haemoglobin and red blood cells.

According to a recent study, an excess of vitamin B12 in the body triggers the occurrence of pimples or acne breakouts. In the presence of vitamin B12, the acne producing bacteria thrives. Vitamin B12 helps these bacteria to pump out inflammatory substances that cause acne. Vitamin B12 changes the gene expression of the bacteria and causes pimples. They found that vitamin B12 changed the gene expression of the skin bacteria, which could have led to acne-promoting inflammation.

Can you use ointments and lotions with B12 for acne?
There is still no proof that creams or ointments containing vitamin B12 are useful for treating acne. It cannot be confirmed too that these creams help psoriasis. On the other hand, there is no evidence that these creams worsen acne. Therefore, it will be wrong to reject such ointments just because they have vitamin B12. It is advisable to consult your dermatologist for the best remedy.

B12 Deficiency and Acne
Acne can also be caused due to vitamin B12 deficiency. People who use retinoid drugs often need additional B12 injections to prevent homocysteine. Retinoid drugs in the form of pills can hinder in the proper functioning of enzymes, especially cystathionine-beta-synthase. Injection of vitamin B12 ensures better functioning of the enzymes and prevents your skin from any breakout. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can ask a free question.

3472 people found this helpful

How To Control Pain After Knee Replacement?

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, Fellowship Joint Replacement Surgery
Orthopedic Doctor, Faridabad
How To Control Pain After Knee Replacement?

Knee replacement can be extremely painful. Previously, opioids or narcotics were administered for pain relief. But excessive addition of opioids is not exactly effective for controlling pain.

Multimodal pain management has become an important part of the perioperative care of patients undergoing total joint replacement. The principle of multimodal therapy is to use interventions that target several different steps of the pain pathway, allowing more effective pain control with fewer side effects. Many different protocols have shown clinical benefit. The goal of this review is to provide a concise overview of the principles and results of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the management of joint arthroplasty patients.

Multimodal denotes administering two or more than two types of medications that work with different mechanisms. The following are the techniques used:

  1. Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block: Prior to the surgery, a catheter is placed beside the femoral nerve for blocking it. This nerve is located in the upper thigh. Medication is delivered through the catheter for the nerve to be numbed for 24 hours. Thus, pain signals to the brain are blocked. This method reduces the use of narcotics and the consequent side effects.

  2. Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): This method is also known as ‘Pain Pump’. An intravenous pump is used to administer pain relief medications, such as oxymorphone or morphine, after the surgery. The control button of the machine could be pressed, by the patient for 6 to 10 times per hour. The machine is used for two post-operative days.

  3. Oral Medications: The oral medications include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs or NSAID; such as Celebrex which is similar to aspirin, structurally. Alternatively, acetaminophen, such as Tylenol or its equivalent composition, can also be used.

  4. Acetaminophen: It acts on the Central Prostaglandin Synthesis and relieves the patient of pain through multiple mechanisms.

  5. Epidural Analgesia: It produces lower pain scores and involves less time for achieving physical therapy goals. However, this is subject to side effects such as dizziness, urinary retention and itchiness.

  6. Gabapentinoids: These medications include membrane stabilizers such as Gabapentin and Pregabalin.

The objective of multimodal treatments is to provide quick relief to the patient and immediately so. Earlier the rehabilitation, more successful will be the knee replacement surgery. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3756 people found this helpful

Different Ways Pain Can Be Treated After It Total Knee Replacement!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, Fellowship In Arthroscopy & Sports Injury, Fellowship Joint Replacement, Fellowship in Shoulder and Elbow, Fellowship in Shoulder and Elbow Surgery
Orthopedic Doctor, Bangalore
Different Ways Pain Can Be Treated After It Total Knee Replacement!

Knee replacement can be extremely painful. Previously, opioids or narcotics were administered for pain relief. But excessive addition of opioids is not exactly effective for controlling pain.

Multimodal pain management has become an important part of the perioperative care of patients undergoing total joint replacement. The principle of multimodal therapy is to use interventions that target several different steps of the pain pathway, allowing more effective pain control with fewer side effects. Many different protocols have shown clinical benefit. The goal of this review is to provide a concise overview of the principles and results of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the management of joint arthroplasty patients.

Multimodal denotes administering two or more than two types of medications that work with different mechanisms. The following are the techniques used:

  1. Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block: Prior to the surgery, a catheter is placed beside the femoral nerve for blocking it. This nerve is located in the upper thigh. Medication is delivered through the catheter for the nerve to be numbed for 24 hours. Thus, pain signals to the brain are blocked. This method reduces the use of narcotics and the consequent side effects.

  2. Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): This method is also known as ‘Pain Pump’. An intravenous pump is used to administer pain relief medications, such as oxymorphone or morphine, after the surgery. The control button of the machine could be pressed, by the patient for 6 to 10 times per hour. The machine is used for two post-operative days.

  3. Oral Medications: The oral medications include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs or NSAID; such as Celebrex which is similar to aspirin, structurally. Alternatively, acetaminophen, such as Tylenol or its equivalent composition, can also be used.

  4. Acetaminophen: It acts on the Central Prostaglandin Synthesis and relieves the patient of pain through multiple mechanisms.

  5. Epidural Analgesia: It produces lower pain scores and involves less time for achieving physical therapy goals. However, this is subject to side effects such as dizziness, urinary retention and itchiness.

  6. Gabapentinoids: These medications include membrane stabilizers such as Gabapentin and Pregabalin.

The objective of multimodal treatments is to provide quick relief to the patient and immediately so. Earlier the rehabilitation, more successful will be the knee replacement surgery.

2618 people found this helpful

Total Knee Replacement - Ways To Manage Multimodal Pain After It!

Dr.Niranjan T J 88% (12ratings)
DNB - Orthopedics, D ( ORTHO), MBBS
Orthopedic Doctor, Trivandrum
Total Knee Replacement - Ways To Manage Multimodal Pain After It!

Knee replacement can be extremely painful. Previously, opioids or narcotics were administered for pain relief. But excessive addition of opioids is not exactly effective for controlling pain.

Multimodal pain management has become an important part of the perioperative care of patients undergoing total joint replacement. The principle of multimodal therapy is to use interventions that target several different steps of the pain pathway, allowing more effective pain control with fewer side effects. Many different protocols have shown clinical benefit. The goal of this review is to provide a concise overview of the principles and results of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the management of joint arthroplasty patients.

Multimodal denotes administering two or more than two types of medications that work with different mechanisms. The following are the techniques used:

  1. Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block: Prior to the surgery, a catheter is placed beside the femoral nerve for blocking it. This nerve is located in the upper thigh. Medication is delivered through the catheter for the nerve to be numbed for 24 hours. Thus, pain signals to the brain are blocked. This method reduces the use of narcotics and the consequent side effects.

  2. Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): This method is also known as ‘Pain Pump’. An intravenous pump is used to administer pain relief medications, such as oxymorphone or morphine, after the surgery. The control button of the machine could be pressed, by the patient for 6 to 10 times per hour. The machine is used for two post-operative days.

  3. Oral Medications: The oral medications include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs or NSAID; such as Celebrex which is similar to aspirin, structurally. Alternatively, acetaminophen, such as Tylenol or its equivalent composition, can also be used.

  4. Acetaminophen: It acts on the Central Prostaglandin Synthesis and relieves the patient of pain through multiple mechanisms.

  5. Epidural Analgesia: It produces lower pain scores and involves less time for achieving physical therapy goals. However, this is subject to side effects such as dizzinessurinary retention and itchiness.

  6. Gabapentinoids: These medications include membrane stabilizers such as Gabapentin and Pregabalin.

The objective of multimodal treatments is to provide quick relief to the patient and immediately so. Earlier the rehabilitation, more successful will be the knee replacement surgery.

3936 people found this helpful

Total Knee Replacement - Ways To Get Quick Relief From Pain!

Dr.Rutul Gandhi 88% (22ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Ahmedabad
Total Knee Replacement - Ways To Get Quick Relief From Pain!

Knee replacement can be extremely painful. Previously, opioids or narcotics were administered for pain relief. But excessive addition of opioids is not exactly effective for controlling pain.

Multimodal pain management has become an important part of the perioperative care of patients undergoing total joint replacement. The principle of multimodal therapy is to use interventions that target several different steps of the pain pathway, allowing more effective pain control with fewer side effects. Many different protocols have shown clinical benefit. The goal of this review is to provide a concise overview of the principles and results of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the management of joint arthroplasty patients.

Multimodal denotes administering two or more than two types of medications that work with different mechanisms. The following are the techniques used:

  1. Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block: Prior to the surgery, a catheter is placed beside the femoral nerve for blocking it. This nerve is located in the upper thigh. Medication is delivered through the catheter for the nerve to be numbed for 24 hours. Thus, pain signals to the brain are blocked. This method reduces the use of narcotics and the consequent side effects.

  2. Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): This method is also known as ‘Pain Pump’. An intravenous pump is used to administer pain relief medications, such as oxymorphone or morphine, after the surgery. The control button of the machine could be pressed, by the patient for 6 to 10 times per hour. The machine is used for two post-operative days.

  3. Oral Medications: The oral medications include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs or NSAID; such as Celebrex which is similar to aspirin, structurally. Alternatively, acetaminophen, such as Tylenol or its equivalent composition, can also be used.

  4. Acetaminophen: It acts on the Central Prostaglandin Synthesis and relieves the patient of pain through multiple mechanisms.

  5. Epidural Analgesia: It produces lower pain scores and involves less time for achieving physical therapy goals. However, this is subject to side effects such as dizzinessurinary retention and itchiness.

  6. Gabapentinoids: These medications include membrane stabilizers such as Gabapentin and Pregabalin.

The objective of multimodal treatments is to provide quick relief to the patient and immediately so. Earlier the rehabilitation, more successful will be the knee replacement surgery.

3685 people found this helpful

Multimodal Pain Relief - Know More About It!

Dr.Jwalant Modi 92% (48ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedic Doctor, Ahmedabad
Multimodal Pain Relief - Know More About It!

Knee replacement can be extremely painful. Previously, opioids or narcotics were administered for pain relief. But excessive addition of opioids is not exactly effective for controlling pain.

Multimodal pain management has become an important part of the perioperative care of patients undergoing total joint replacement. The principle of multimodal therapy is to use interventions that target several different steps of the pain pathway, allowing more effective pain control with fewer side effects. Many different protocols have shown clinical benefit. The goal of this review is to provide a concise overview of the principles and results of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the management of joint arthroplasty patients.

Multimodal denotes administering two or more than two types of medications that work with different mechanisms. The following are the techniques used:

  1. Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block: Prior to the surgery, a catheter is placed beside the femoral nerve for blocking it. This nerve is located in the upper thigh. Medication is delivered through the catheter for the nerve to be numbed for 24 hours. Thus, pain signals to the brain are blocked. This method reduces the use of narcotics and the consequent side effects.

  2. Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): This method is also known as ‘Pain Pump’. An intravenous pump is used to administer pain relief medications, such as oxymorphone or morphine, after the surgery. The control button of the machine could be pressed, by the patient for 6 to 10 times per hour. The machine is used for two post-operative days.

  3. Oral Medications: The oral medications include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs or NSAID; such as Celebrex which is similar to aspirin, structurally. Alternatively, acetaminophen, such as Tylenol or its equivalent composition, can also be used.

  4. Acetaminophen: It acts on the Central Prostaglandin Synthesis and relieves the patient of pain through multiple mechanisms.

  5. Epidural Analgesia: It produces lower pain scores and involves less time for achieving physical therapy goals. However, this is subject to side effects such as dizziness, urinary retention and itchiness.

  6. Gabapentinoids: These medications include membrane stabilizers such as Gabapentin and Pregabalin.

The objective of multimodal treatments is to provide quick relief to the patient and immediately so. Earlier the rehabilitation, more successful will be the knee replacement surgery.

2558 people found this helpful

How Effective Is Multimodal Pain Relief Subsequently Total Knee Replacement?

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Lucknow
How Effective Is Multimodal Pain Relief Subsequently Total Knee Replacement?

Knee replacement can be extremely painful. Previously, opioids or narcotics were administered for pain relief. But excessive addition of opioids is not exactly effective for controlling pain.

Multimodal pain management has become an important part of the perioperative care of patients undergoing total joint replacement. The principle of multimodal therapy is to use interventions that target several different steps of the pain pathway, allowing more effective pain control with fewer side effects. Many different protocols have shown clinical benefit. The goal of this review is to provide a concise overview of the principles and results of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the management of joint arthroplasty patients.

Multimodal denotes administering two or more than two types of medications that work with different mechanisms. The following are the techniques used:

  1. Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block: Prior to the surgery, a catheter is placed beside the femoral nerve for blocking it. This nerve is located in the upper thigh. Medication is delivered through the catheter for the nerve to be numbed for 24 hours. Thus, pain signals to the brain are blocked. This method reduces the use of narcotics and the consequent side effects.

  2. Patient-Controlled Analgesia (PCA): This method is also known as ‘Pain Pump’. An intravenous pump is used to administer pain relief medications, such as oxymorphone or morphine, after the surgery. The control button of the machine could be pressed, by the patient for 6 to 10 times per hour. The machine is used for two post-operative days.

  3. Oral Medications: The oral medications include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs or NSAID; such as Celebrex which is similar to aspirin, structurally. Alternatively, acetaminophen, such as Tylenol or its equivalent composition, can also be used.

  4. Acetaminophen: It acts on the Central Prostaglandin Synthesis and relieves the patient of pain through multiple mechanisms.

  5. Epidural Analgesia: It produces lower pain scores and involves less time for achieving physical therapy goals. However, this is subject to side effects such as dizziness, urinary retention and itchiness.

  6. Gabapentinoids: These medications include membrane stabilizers such as Gabapentin and Pregabalin.

The objective of multimodal treatments is to provide quick relief to the patient and immediately so. Earlier the rehabilitation, more successful will be the knee replacement surgery. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult the best Orthopedic doctor in Lucknow & get answers to your questions!

2778 people found this helpful

Total Knee Replacement - Ways To Get Rid Of The Pain After It!

Dr.Umesh Kulkarni 87% (21ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, Diploma In Orthopedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Nashik
Total Knee Replacement - Ways To Get Rid Of The Pain After It!

Knee replacement can be extremely painful. Previously, opioids or narcotics were administered for pain relief. But excessive addition of opioids is not exactly effective for controlling pain.

Multimodal pain management has become an important part of the perioperative care of patients undergoing total joint replacement. The principle of multimodal therapy is to use interventions that target several different steps of the pain pathway, allowing more effective pain control with fewer side effects. Many different protocols have shown clinical benefit. The goal of this review is to provide a concise overview of the principles and results of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the management of joint arthroplasty patients.

Multimodal denotes administering two or more than two types of medications that work with different mechanisms. The following are the techniques used:

  1. Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block: Prior to the surgery, a catheter is placed beside the femoral nerve for blocking it. This nerve is located in the upper thigh. Medication is delivered through the catheter for the nerve to be numbed for 24 hours. Thus, pain signals to the brain are blocked. This method reduces the use of narcotics and the consequent side effects.

  2. Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): This method is also known as ‘Pain Pump’. An intravenous pump is used to administer pain relief medications, such as oxymorphone or morphine, after the surgery. The control button of the machine could be pressed, by the patient for 6 to 10 times per hour. The machine is used for two post-operative days.

  3. Oral Medications: The oral medications include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs or NSAID; such as Celebrex which is similar to aspirin, structurally. Alternatively, acetaminophen, such as Tylenol or its equivalent composition, can also be used.

  4. Acetaminophen: It acts on the Central Prostaglandin Synthesis and relieves the patient of pain through multiple mechanisms.

  5. Epidural Analgesia: It produces lower pain scores and involves less time for achieving physical therapy goals. However, this is subject to side effects such as dizzinessurinary retention and itchiness.

  6. Gabapentinoids: These medications include membrane stabilizers such as Gabapentin and Pregabalin.

The objective of multimodal treatments is to provide quick relief to the patient and immediately so. Earlier the rehabilitation, more successful will be the knee replacement surgery.

4715 people found this helpful

Total Knee Replacement - Tips For Multimodal Pain Relief After It!

MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MS - Orthopaedics, Fellowship In Joint Replacement, Fellowship In Minimal Invasive Subvastus Knee Replacement
Orthopedic Doctor, Navi Mumbai
Total Knee Replacement - Tips For Multimodal Pain Relief After It!

Knee replacement can be extremely painful. Previously, opioids or narcotics were administered for pain relief. But excessive addition of opioids is not exactly effective for controlling pain.

Multimodal pain management has become an important part of the perioperative care of patients undergoing total joint replacement. The principle of multimodal therapy is to use interventions that target several different steps of the pain pathway, allowing more effective pain control with fewer side effects. Many different protocols have shown clinical benefit. The goal of this review is to provide a concise overview of the principles and results of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the management of joint arthroplasty patients.

Multimodal denotes administering two or more than two types of medications that work with different mechanisms. The following are the techniques used:

  1. Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block: Prior to the surgery, a catheter is placed beside the femoral nerve for blocking it. This nerve is located in the upper thigh. Medication is delivered through the catheter for the nerve to be numbed for 24 hours. Thus, pain signals to the brain are blocked. This method reduces the use of narcotics and the consequent side effects.

  2. Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): This method is also known as ‘Pain Pump’. An intravenous pump is used to administer pain relief medications, such as oxymorphone or morphine, after the surgery. The control button of the machine could be pressed, by the patient for 6 to 10 times per hour. The machine is used for two post-operative days.

  3. Oral Medications: The oral medications include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs or NSAID; such as Celebrex which is similar to aspirin, structurally. Alternatively, acetaminophen, such as Tylenol or its equivalent composition, can also be used.

  4. Acetaminophen: It acts on the Central Prostaglandin Synthesis and relieves the patient of pain through multiple mechanisms.

  5. Epidural Analgesia: It produces lower pain scores and involves less time for achieving physical therapy goals. However, this is subject to side effects such as dizzinessurinary retention and itchiness.

  6. Gabapentinoids: These medications include membrane stabilizers such as Gabapentin and Pregabalin.

The objective of multimodal treatments is to provide quick relief to the patient and immediately so. Earlier the rehabilitation, more successful will be the knee replacement surgery.

5233 people found this helpful

Multimodal Pain Management & Knee Replacement - How Former Can Benefit Latter?

MS - Orthopaedics, AO Fellowship in Trauma, Fellow Spine Surgeon, fellow in Endoscopic Spine Surgery
Orthopedic Doctor, Gurgaon
Multimodal Pain Management & Knee Replacement - How Former Can Benefit Latter?

Knee replacement can be extremely painful. Previously, opioids or narcotics were administered for pain relief. But excessive addition of opioids is not exactly effective for controlling pain.

Multimodal pain management has become an important part of the perioperative care of patients undergoing total joint replacement. The principle of multimodal therapy is to use interventions that target several different steps of the pain pathway, allowing more effective pain control with fewer side effects. Many different protocols have shown clinical benefit. The goal of this review is to provide a concise overview of the principles and results of multimodal pain management regimens as a practical guide for the management of joint arthroplasty patients.

Multimodal denotes administering two or more than two types of medications that work with different mechanisms. The following are the techniques used:

  1. Pre-operative Femoral Nerve Block: Prior to the surgery, a catheter is placed beside the femoral nerve for blocking it. This nerve is located in the upper thigh. Medication is delivered through the catheter for the nerve to be numbed for 24 hours. Thus, pain signals to the brain are blocked. This method reduces the use of narcotics and the consequent side effects.

  2. Patient Controlled Analgesia (PCA): This method is also known as ‘Pain Pump’. An intravenous pump is used to administer pain relief medications, such as oxymorphone or morphine, after the surgery. The control button of the machine could be pressed, by the patient for 6 to 10 times per hour. The machine is used for two postoperative days.

  3. Oral Medications: The oral medications include Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory drugs or NSAID; such as Celebrex which is similar to aspirin, structurally. Alternatively, acetaminophen, such as Tylenol or its equivalent composition, can also be used.

  4. Acetaminophen: It acts on the Central Prostaglandin Synthesis and relieves the patient of pain through multiple mechanisms.

  5. Epidural Analgesia: It produces lower pain scores and involves less time for achieving physical therapy goals. However, this is subject to side effects such as dizziness, urinary retention and itchiness.

  6. Gabapentinoids: These medications include membrane stabilizers such as Gabapentin and Pregabalin.

The objective of multimodal treatments is to provide quick relief to the patient and immediately so. Earlier the rehabilitation, more successful will be the knee replacement surgery.

3719 people found this helpful