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Nalosil Cream Tips

10. Use a mouthwash containing anti-bacterial like chlorhexidine to help control gum diseases.
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Avoid over use of the chlorhexidine mouthwash.
Use only by advice of the dentist. Over use alter the microbial flora of mouth. This result in black spot on tongue.

Gum Pain Home Remedies

Gum Pain Home Remedies
Try Rinse

It is recommended to use a rinse with anti-plaque properties. It helps to reduce the amount of plaque mass in your mouth at any one time. Your best bet is a rinse that contains chlorhexidine. Since such products are only available by prescription, you should ask your dentist whether one would be right for you. Some over-the-counter rinses such as Listerine has been shown to be effective in preventing plaque buildup, but they don’t work as well as those with chlorhexidine.

Medications That Can Stain Teeth!

Medications That Can Stain Teeth!

The antibiotic tetracycline causes gray teeth in children whose teeth are still developing. Antibacterial mouthwashes that contain chlorhexidine or cetylpyridinium chloride can also stain teeth. Some antihistamines, antipsychotic drugs, and blood pressure medications cause tooth stains, like iron and excess fluoride. If bleaching doesn't help, ask your dentist about dental bonding, in which tooth-colored material is applied to teeth.

medications that can stain teeth

medications that can stain teeth
Medications that can stain teeth

The antibiotic tetracycline causes gray teeth in children whose teeth are still developing. Antibacterial mouthwashes that contain chlorhexidine or cetylpyridinium chloride can also stain teeth. Some antihistamines, antipsychotic drugs, and blood pressure medications cause tooth stains, as can iron and excess fluoride. If bleaching doesn't help, ask your dentist about dental bonding, in which a tooth-colored material is applied to teeth.

Mouthwash - What Should You Know?

Mouthwash - What Should You Know?

Mouthwash has become an essential ingredient of one's oral hygiene kit. Though not a substitute for flossing or brushing, it offers additional oral protection. Due to a host of ingredients, such as alcohol,

Chlorhexidine, cetylpyridinium chloride, menthol, methyl salicylate, fluoride, antibacterial enzymes, hydrogen peroxide, essential oils, zinc chloride and other herbs and "natural" ingredients mouthwash has a number of benefits.

Alcohol is the basic ingredient in all of them. While fluoride protects against decay, chlorhexidine protects against gum diseases. Hydrogen peroxide produces a mild bleaching effect. Herbs and essential oils produce a freshening effect.

Benefits of using a mouthwash

1. Reduces the formation of tartar and plaque.
2. Protects from oral problems like gingivitis and periodontal disease, especially if it contains cetylpyridinium or essential oils. Chlorhexidine is also effective in protecting plaque formation and gingivitis.
3. Kills bacteria in the mouth and prevents cavities or decay, especially if it contains fluoride.
4. Mouthwash, to some extent, covers up bad breath due to oral hygiene or oral disease and produces a fresher breath.
5. Certain mouthwashes containing cetylpyridinium chloride and zinc chloride produce a better breath freshening effect.
6. Helps manage dry mouth, especially if containing biotene.

Types of Mouthwash

1. Cosmetic
2. Therapeutic

The cosmetic one is usually for freshening up the breath and is not regulated by the FDA. The therapeutic ones contain active ingredients aimed at addressing one of the issues like plaque formation, bad breath, dry mouth, or decay. They kill bacteria, reduce plaque, fight gingivitis, and control decay. They are not a substitute for brushing or flossing but supplement these two very well. These are approved by FDA and are proven in terms of safety and efficacy. Rinses with zinc chloride are effective against bad breath, those with fluoride are useful in people who are cavity-prone, and chlorhexidine helps prevent gum disease.

Choosing a mouthwash: This depends on the oral health condition, and it is always advisable that the dentist prescribes the right rinse for you.

When and how to use mouthwash: When you are done with your brushing and flossing, rinse your mouth with a capful of the mouthwash liquid. Swish it around your mouth for about 30 seconds and spit it out. Avoid brushing, drinking water, or rinsing your mouth after using a mouthwash for about 15 to 20 minutes. This will give sufficient time for the active ingredients in the mouthwash (especially if it is a therapeutic one) to act in the mouth. Brushing after mouthwash removes all the effect of the rinse.

Mouthwash - How Vital Is It?

Mouthwash - How Vital Is It?

Mouthwash has become an essential ingredient of one's oral hygiene kit. Though not a substitute for flossing or brushing, it offers additional oral protection.

Due to a host of ingredients, such as alcohol, chlorhexidine, cetylpyridinium chloride, menthol, methyl salicylate, fluoride, antibacterial enzymes, hydrogen peroxide, essential oils, zinc chloride and other herbs and natural ingredients, mouthwash has a number of benefits.

Alcohol is the basic ingredient in all of them. While fluoride protects against decay, chlorhexidine protects against gum diseases. Hydrogen peroxide produces a mild bleaching effect. Herbs and essential oils produce a freshening effect.

Benefits of using a mouthwash -

  1. Reduces the formation of tartar and plaque.
  2. Protects from oral problems like gingivitis and periodontal disease, especially if it contains cetylpyridinium or essential oils. Chlorhexidine is also effective in protecting plaque formation and gingivitis.
  3. Kills bacteria in the mouth and prevents cavities or decay, especially if it contains fluoride.
  4. Mouthwash, to some extent, covers up bad breath due to oral hygiene or oral disease and produces a fresher breath.
  5. Certain mouthwashes containing cetylpyridinium chloride and zinc chloride produce a better breath freshening effect.
  6. Helps manage dry mouth, especially if containing Biotene.

Types of Mouthwash -

1. Cosmetic
2. Therapeutic

The cosmetic one is usually for freshening up the breath and is not regulated by the FDA. The therapeutic ones contain active ingredients aimed at addressing one of the issues like plaque formation, bad breath, dry mouth, or decay. They kill bacteria, reduce plaque, fight gingivitis, and control decay. They are not a substitute for brushing or flossing but supplement these two very well. These are approved by the FDA and are proven in terms of safety and efficacy. Rinses with zinc chloride are effective against bad breath, those with fluoride are useful in people who are cavity-prone, and chlorhexidine helps prevent gum disease.

Choosing a mouthwash - This depends on the oral health condition, and it is always advisable that the dentist prescribes the right rinse for you.

When and how to use mouthwash - When you are done with your brushing and flossing, rinse your mouth with a capful of the mouthwash liquid. Swish it around your mouth for about 30 seconds and spit it out. Avoid brushing, drinking water, or rinsing your mouth after using a mouthwash for about 15 to 20 minutes. This will give sufficient time for the active ingredients in the mouthwash (especially if it is a therapeutic one) to act in the mouth. Brushing after mouthwash removes all the effect of the rinse.

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Mouthwash: All You Need to Know About it

Mouthwash: All You Need to Know About it

Mouthwash has become an essential ingredient of one's oral hygiene kit. Though not a substitute for flossing or brushing, it offers additional oral protection. Due to a host of ingredients, such as alcohol,
Chlorhexidine, cetylpyridinium chloride, menthol, methyl salicylate, fluoride, antibacterial enzymes, hydrogen peroxide, essential oils, zinc chloride and other herbs and "natural" ingredients mouthwash has a number of benefits.

Alcohol is the basic ingredient in all of them. While fluoride protects against decay, chlorhexidine protects against gum diseases. Hydrogen peroxide produces a mild bleaching effect. Herbs and essential oils produce a freshening effect.

Benefits of using a mouthwash

1. Reduces formation of tartar and plaque.
2. Protects from oral problems like gingivitis and periodontal disease, especially if it contains cetylpyridinium or essential oils. Chlorhexidine is also effective in protecting plaque formation and gingivitis.
3. Kills bacteria in the mouth and prevents cavities or decay, especially if it contains fluoride.
4. Mouthwash, to some extent, covers up bad breath due to oral hygiene or oral disease and produces a fresher breath.

5. Certain mouthwashes containing cetylpyridinium chloride and zinc chloride produce a better breath freshening effect.
6. Helps manage dry mouth, especially if containing biotene.

Types of Mouthwash

1. Cosmetic
2. Therapeutic

The cosmetic one is usually for freshening up the breath and is not regulated by the FDA. The therapeutic ones contain active ingredients aimed at addressing one of the issues like plaque formation, bad breath, dry mouth, or decay. They kill bacteria, reduce plaque, fight gingivitis, and control decay. They are not a substitute for brushing or flossing but supplement these two very well. These are approved by FDA and are proven in terms of safety and efficacy. Rinses with zinc chloride are effective against bad breath, those with fluoride are useful in people who are cavity-prone, and chlorhexidine helps prevent gum disease.

Choosing a mouthwash: This depends on the oral health condition, and it is always advisable that the dentist prescribes the right rinse for you.

When and how to use mouthwash: When you are done with your brushing and flossing, rinse your mouth with a capful of the mouthwash liquid. Swish it around your mouth for about 30 seconds and spit it out. Avoid brushing, drinking water, or rinsing your mouth after using a mouthwash for about 15 to 20 minutes. This will give sufficient time for the active ingredients in the mouthwash (especially if it is a therapeutic one) to act in the mouth. Brushing after mouthwash removes all the effect of the rinse.

7963 people found this helpful

Pityriasis Amiantacea - A Guide!

Pityriasis Amiantacea - A Guide!

Pityriasis amiantacea is a disorder of the scalp. Some of the visible signs of this condition include adherent, silver, thick scales. The scales resemble the color of the asbestos and often surrounds the tufts of hair. While the condition is manageable, care should be taken to manage this condition right from its inception. Here is a brief overview of this scalp condition.

Origin of Pityriasis Amiantacea:
Pityriasis Amiantacea is inflammatory in nature. It comes from the seborrheic and psoriasis dermatitis spectrum. Experts are of the view that this condition is a result of the exaggerated response of the body to a primary condition of the scalp. Earlier studies have suggested that there is a possibility that Pityriasis Amiantacea may have originated from lichen planus, pyogenic infection and superficial fungal. In most of the cases, it has been witnessed that fungus has a close relation to this condition.

Exposure of Pityriasis Amiantacea and its diagnosis:
This condition has low exposure among females. It is mostly observed among, young adults, children, and adolescents. The diagnosis is done clinically. A specialist might prescribe dermoscopy to rule out other conditions of the scalp. If the result is positive, the scaling will reveal a diffused yellowish or whitish pattern. While the condition is local, it has all the possibilities to spread to other hairy parts of the body. Some experts are of the view that Pityriasis Amiantacea has a close association with temporary alopecia. While histopathology is not prescribed by most doctors, however, biopsy of the scalp is suggested in many cases.


Does Pityriasis Amiantacea result in hair loss?
The answer is yes. As a result of the scaly crust, the encased hair tends to fall. This being said, it is entirely a reversible condition. The hair comes back in 9 out of 10 cases. Medical ointments and antibiotic shampoo can help to grow back the lost hair. Apart from this, home-made protein solutions can help in the regeneration of the hair and get back the original color of the hair.

Treatment options:
This is a treatable condition that might take some time for a complete cure. It involves the keratolytic and tropical anti-inflammatory treatment. This is accompanied with salicylic ointment and topical corticosteroids. A tropical mineral oil is often prescribed by doctors to ensure that the adherent scales are removed. Some doctors might also suggest a clobetasol propionate shampoo. Even ketoconazole and silver sulfadiazine is helpful to get rid of the scales. If in case the infection is accompanied with Staphylococcus aureus, antibiotics are prescribed to ensure that the condition does not turn from bad to worse. Systematic therapies are suggested if this condition is accompanied by an underlying condition such as psoriasis. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4313 people found this helpful

Pityriasis Amiantacea - How To Diagnose It?

Pityriasis Amiantacea - How To Diagnose It?

Pityriasis amiantacea is a disorder of the scalp. Some of the visible signs of this condition include adherent, silver, thick scales. The scales resemble the color of the asbestos and often surrounds the tufts of hair. While the condition is manageable, care should be taken to manage this condition right from its inception. Here is a brief overview of this scalp condition.

Origin of Pityriasis Amiantacea:
Pityriasis Amiantacea is inflammatory in nature. It comes from the seborrheic and psoriasis dermatitis spectrum. Experts are of the view that this condition is a result of the exaggerated response of the body to a primary condition of the scalp. Earlier studies have suggested that there is a possibility that Pityriasis Amiantacea may have originated from lichen planus, pyogenic infection and superficial fungal. In most of the cases, it has been witnessed that fungus has a close relation to this condition.

Exposure of Pityriasis Amiantacea and its diagnosis:
This condition has low exposure among females. It is mostly observed among, young adults, children, and adolescents. The diagnosis is done clinically. A specialist might prescribe dermoscopy to rule out other conditions of the scalp. If the result is positive, the scaling will reveal a diffused yellowish or whitish pattern. While the condition is local, it has all the possibilities to spread to other hairy parts of the body. Some experts are of the view that Pityriasis Amiantacea has a close association with temporary alopecia. While histopathology is not prescribed by most doctors, however, biopsy of the scalp is suggested in many cases.

Does Pityriasis Amiantacea result in hair loss?
The answer is yes. As a result of the scaly crust, the encased hair tends to fall. This being said, it is entirely a reversible condition. The hair comes back in 9 out of 10 cases. Medical ointments and antibiotic shampoo can help to grow back the lost hair. Apart from this, home-made protein solutions can help in the regeneration of the hair and get back the original color of the hair.

Treatment options:
This is a treatable condition that might take some time for a complete cure. It involves the keratolytic and tropical anti-inflammatory treatment. This is accompanied with salicylic ointment and topical corticosteroids. A tropical mineral oil is often prescribed by doctors to ensure that the adherent scales are removed. Some doctors might also suggest a clobetasol propionate shampoo. Even ketoconazole and silver sulfadiazine is helpful to get rid of the scales. If in case the infection is accompanied with Staphylococcus aureus, antibiotics are prescribed to ensure that the condition does not turn from bad to worse. Systematic therapies are suggested if this condition is accompanied by an underlying condition such as psoriasis.

3803 people found this helpful