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Lornicam 8 MG Tablet Tips

Getting out of Self Doubt (SD)!

Dr.Shreyas Pendharkar 89% (482ratings)
MD-Psychiatry, MBBS, Certificate in Medical Neuroscience
Psychiatrist, Akola
Getting out of Self Doubt (SD)!
Step out of Denial Mode
When we never admit there is a problem, we cannot seek a solution. Acknowledge your shortcoming and problems which leaves you helpless. Also, dig into your belief system and thought patterns which help sustain SD. Discuss it with your trusted colleagues in the same settings and how do they manage it? Modify your belief system and coping strategies if required.
Maintain a SMILE Journal/ Diary
Record interesting little things that made you happy today. Write a few lines every time you glean a new lesson from your experiences. These small records will help you cheer up whenever you find yourself stuck in old helpless rut.

Locate your support system
Its important to identify your support system in advance. Individuals who are approachable and can guide you out of dense fog of SD. Someone who can help you in modifying existing coping strategies for desirable results.
Maintain Emotional Wellbeing
While trying to step out of SD its important to take care of your emotional wellbeing. Continuous struggle, chances of relapse, exhaustion may lead to frustration and thus anger outbursts, which are capable of diminishing all the progress you have made so far. Learn how to express anger in a healthy way, so that you can use it as an effective tool instead of spoiling everything.
Let go of Fear
A pinch of Fear can do more damage than all criticism summed up. Let go of all excuses & false beliefs that comes in the way of helping yourself. Since everything you tried till date didn’t worked its time to try something new. Start with breaking strings from self doubt. Parent your inner child in the process. Foster making mistakes and take the opportunity to learn something new rather than demoralizing yourself.
I hope these steps at your personal level shall boost you to step out of SD and if nothing works, seek help from a compassionate therapist to ride this rip.

Are Osteoporosis and Osteopenia fast turning into diseases of the young?

Dr.Kamal Bachani 90% (278ratings)
International Arthroscopy , Shoulder Surgery Fellowship, M Ch. Ortho, Fellowship in Joint Replacement, Fellowship Tr.Sports surgery/arthroscopy, Fellowship in Orthopaedic Rehabilitation (FOR), MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedic Doctor, Delhi
Are Osteoporosis and Osteopenia fast turning into diseases of the young?

Why Osteoporosis and Osteopenia are fast turning into diseases of the young.

Did you know that osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures worldwide every year? What is frightening is many  of these fractures are now taking place among the youth due to deficit  diet and poor lifestyle coupled with genetic predisposition. Both osteoporosis and osteopenia are two forms of bone loss conditions, with the latter being a precursor to the former. To distinguish between the two a bone mineral density test is usually performed.

What is difference between Osteoporosis and Osteopenia?

A BMD (bone mineral density) T-score between -1 SD and -2.5 SD indicates osteopenia with a high chance of osteoporosis. On the other hand, a T-score of -2.5 SD and below stands for osteoporosis. A higher bone density (above -1SD) is usually indicative of stronger bones. Fragility index is more accurate way to assess risk of fractures.

In osteoporosis the bone loss or weakening of bones take place over a long period of time, and results in unexpected fractures and severe bone problems. Disfigurement, fractures in the spine, loss of mobility and independence are usual characteristics of this bone disease once it progresses further.

Prevention is better than cure, ALWAYS!

To keep bones strong and healthy, calcium and phosphate is continuously absorbed by the body. But after 30, the body’s ability to absorb calcium slows down and there’s a decrease in the production of new bones. In contrast, bone desorption (the process of transferring calcium from the bone to the blood) continues unabated.

When the body starts absorbing the store of calcium in the bones to meets its needs, it leads to calcium depletion and is one of the causes of weakening of the bone.

At present, the age limit (50-60 years) for osteoporosis has seen a drop with many younger people increasingly suffering from the ailment. Factors like unhealthy lifestyle, late-night shifts, smoking and alcohol consumption have been found to be the culprits behind the rise in osteoporosis cases among the young.  Recent studies have identified vitamin D deficiency as a major factor for poor bone health and bone mass density in the young.

How to keep your bones strong and healthy? And manage Osteo - penia/porosis complications:

Bone loss can be prevented by adopting these very simple but effective ways:

- Exercising can help in building strong bones and muscles, while preventing bone loss.

- Maintaining a calcium intake of 1000 mg for pre-menopausal women and 1200 mg for women post menopause.

- Staying out in the sun for 20 minutes to produce requisite amount of Vitamin D for calcium absorption and using supplements of vitamin D.

- there are many safe medicines available to prevent and treat osteoporosis like alendronates, calcitonin, Parathyroid , teriparatide preparation etc.

- In osteoporosis induced /associated fractures we have to to modify implants to negate weak purchase of implants in bone and improve mobility.

We have been using these modifications in established osteopenia/porosis case in fractures treatment/joint replacement/ arthroscopic fixations and MIS spine fracture management.

 

'Consult'.

4376 people found this helpful

Osteoporosis And Osteopenia - Know The Difference!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Chennai
Osteoporosis And Osteopenia - Know The Difference!

Did you know that osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures worldwide every year? What is frightening is many  of these fractures are now taking place among the youth due to deficit  diet and poor lifestyle coupled with genetic predisposition. Both osteoporosis and osteopenia are two forms of bone loss conditions, with the latter being a precursor to the former. To distinguish between the two a bone mineral density test is usually performed.

What is difference between Osteoporosis and Osteopenia?

A BMD (bone mineral density) T-score between -1 SD and -2.5 SD indicates osteopenia with a high chance of osteoporosis. On the other hand, a T-score of -2.5 SD and below stands for osteoporosis. A higher bone density (above -1SD) is usually indicative of stronger bones. Fragility index is more accurate way to assess risk of fractures.

In osteoporosis the bone loss or weakening of bones take place over a long period of time, and results in unexpected fractures and severe bone problems. Disfigurement, fractures in the spine, loss of mobility and independence are usual characteristics of this bone disease once it progresses further.

Prevention is better than cure, ALWAYS!

To keep bones strong and healthy, calcium and phosphate is continuously absorbed by the body. But after 30, the body’s ability to absorb calcium slows down and there’s a decrease in the production of new bones. In contrast, bone desorption (the process of transferring calcium from the bone to the blood) continues unabated.

When the body starts absorbing the store of calcium in the bones to meets its needs, it leads to calcium depletion and is one of the causes of weakening of the bone.

At present, the age limit (50-60 years) for osteoporosis has seen a drop with many younger people increasingly suffering from the ailment. Factors like unhealthy lifestyle, late-night shifts, smoking and alcohol consumption have been found to be the culprits behind the rise in osteoporosis cases among the young.  Recent studies have identified vitamin D deficiency as a major factor for poor bone health and bone mass density in the young.

How to keep your bones strong and healthy? And manage Osteo - penia/porosis complications:

Bone loss can be prevented by adopting these very simple but effective ways:

- Exercising can help in building strong bones and muscles, while preventing bone loss.

- Maintaining a calcium intake of 1000 mg for pre-menopausal women and 1200 mg for women post menopause.

- Staying out in the sun for 20 minutes to produce requisite amount of Vitamin D for calcium absorption and using supplements of vitamin D.

- There are many safe medicines available to prevent and treat osteoporosis like alendronates, calcitonin, Parathyroid, teriparatide preparation etc.

- In osteoporosis induced /associated fractures we have to to modify implants to negate weak purchase of implants in bone and improve mobility.

We have been using these modifications in established osteopenia/porosis case in fractures treatment/joint replacement/ arthroscopic fixations and MIS spine fracture management. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an orthopedist.

4245 people found this helpful

Osteoporosis And Osteopenia - Tips To Prevent Bone Loss!

Dr.Shekhar Srivastav 86% (20ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MS - Orthopaedics, AO Fellowship
Orthopedic Doctor, Delhi
Osteoporosis And Osteopenia - Tips To Prevent Bone Loss!

Did you know that osteoporosis causes more than 8.9 million fractures worldwide every year? What is frightening is many  of these fractures are now taking place among the youth due to deficit  diet and poor lifestyle coupled with genetic predisposition. Both osteoporosis and osteopenia are two forms of bone loss conditions, with the latter being a precursor to the former. To distinguish between the two a bone mineral density test is usually performed.

What is difference between Osteoporosis and Osteopenia?

A BMD (bone mineral density) T-score between -1 SD and -2.5 SD indicates osteopenia with a high chance of osteoporosis. On the other hand, a T-score of -2.5 SD and below stands for osteoporosis. A higher bone density (above -1SD) is usually indicative of stronger bones. Fragility index is more accurate way to assess risk of fractures.

In osteoporosis the bone loss or weakening of bones take place over a long period of time, and results in unexpected fractures and severe bone problems. Disfigurement, fractures in the spine, loss of mobility and independence are usual characteristics of this bone disease once it progresses further.

Prevention is better than cure, ALWAYS!

To keep bones strong and healthy, calcium and phosphate is continuously absorbed by the body. But after 30, the body’s ability to absorb calcium slows down and there’s a decrease in the production of new bones. In contrast, bone desorption (the process of transferring calcium from the bone to the blood) continues unabated.

When the body starts absorbing the store of calcium in the bones to meets its needs, it leads to calcium depletion and is one of the causes of weakening of the bone.

At present, the age limit (50-60 years) for osteoporosis has seen a drop with many younger people increasingly suffering from the ailment. Factors like unhealthy lifestyle, late-night shifts, smoking and alcohol consumption have been found to be the culprits behind the rise in osteoporosis cases among the young.  Recent studies have identified vitamin D deficiency as a major factor for poor bone health and bone mass density in the young.

How to keep your bones strong and healthy? And manage Osteo - penia/porosis complications:

Bone loss can be prevented by adopting these very simple but effective ways:

- Exercising can help in building strong bones and muscles, while preventing bone loss.

- Maintaining a calcium intake of 1000 mg for pre-menopausal women and 1200 mg for women post menopause.

- Staying out in the sun for 20 minutes to produce requisite amount of Vitamin D for calcium absorption and using supplements of vitamin D.

- There are many safe medicines available to prevent and treat osteoporosis like alendronates, calcitonin, Parathyroid , teriparatide preparation etc.

- In osteoporosis induced /associated fractures we have to to modify implants to negate weak purchase of implants in bone and improve mobility.

We have been using these modifications in established osteopenia/porosis case in fractures treatment/joint replacement/ arthroscopic fixations and MIS spine fracture management.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3997 people found this helpful

Bone Mineral Density Test - How Can It Help Identify Osteopenia?

Dr.Kunal Dhurve 90% (44ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, Fellow In Joint Replacement And Arthoscopy Surgery
Orthopedic Doctor, Nashik
Bone Mineral Density Test - How Can It Help Identify Osteopenia?

230394Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases.
2677 people found this helpful

Osteopenia or Osteoporosis - Know More About It!

Dr.Rakesh Kumar 91% (144ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedic Doctor, Delhi
Osteopenia or Osteoporosis - Know More About It!

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases.
2538 people found this helpful

How Low Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Can Cause Osteopenia?

DNB - Orthopedics/Orthopedic Surgery, MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, Fellowship In Joint Replacement
Orthopedic Doctor, Bangalore
How Low Bone Mineral Density (BMD) Can Cause  Osteopenia?

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases.
3593 people found this helpful

Osteopenia or Osteoporosis - How To Analyse If You Are At Risk?

Dr.Gautam R Prasad 90% (25ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, Fellow In Spine Surgery
Spine and Pain Specialist, Patna
Osteopenia or Osteoporosis - How To Analyse If You Are At Risk?

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases.
4631 people found this helpful

Risk Factors Of Osteopenia!

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Spine and Pain Specialist, Delhi
Risk Factors Of Osteopenia!

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an Orthopaedist.
3369 people found this helpful

Understanding The Risk Factors Of Osteopenia & Osteoporosis!

Dr.Mukesh Kumar Agarwal 88% (28ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, DNB (Orthopedics)
Orthopedic Doctor, Guwahati
Understanding The Risk Factors Of Osteopenia & Osteoporosis!

Osteopenia is a medical condition that gradually causes thinning of bone mass. While the thinning mass is not considered as severe, the real danger looms when osteopenia aggravates to osteoporosis, resulting in a bone fracture. Osteopenia is mostly witnessed in people above the age of 50. The difference between the diagnosis of osteopenia and osteoporosis lies in the measure of bone density.

Osteoporosis, on the other hand, is the loss of bone mass due to the deficiency of calcium, magnesium, vitamin D and other minerals and vitamins. Osteoporosis can lead to broken bones, height loss, acute pain and humpback. It is estimated that over 54 million people in the US suffer from osteoporosis.

Bone mineral density (BMD):
The calcium deposit in the bone is measured by the bone mineral density (BMD) test. This test rightly estimates the chances of bone fracture in a person. Furthermore, it helps a doctor to distinguish between osteopenia and osteoporosis. Being non-invasive in nature, this test can be performed anytime on areas such as hip, shin bone, spine etc. BMD can either be measured by plain radiographs or DEXA. The latter is a form of X-ray that has lesser exposure to radiation. Post the test, a score is given based on the calcium availability of the bones.

How is a BMD comprehended?
Every BMD result is evaluated in the form of T-score. The T-score is derived by comparing the result of the BMD with a normal person in the 30’s having the same race and sex. The difference of score between a healthy individual and a patient affected with osteoporosis or osteopenia is referred to as Standard Deviation. A patient with a T-score in the range of (-1SD) to (-2.5SD) is considered a prime candidate for osteopenia. A patient having a T-score lesser than -2.5SD is diagnosed with osteoporosis.

Risk factor for osteopenia or osteoporosis:
While not everyone runs the risk of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis, there are certain risk factors attached to it:

  1. Gender: Women run a higher risk of getting affected with osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  2. Race: Women who belong from the Caucasian or Asian origin run a higher risk of getting these diseases.
  3. Age: Most people tend to get these diseases above the age of 50. Humans have a tendency of losing close to 0.5 percent of bone every year after a certain age.
  4. Family history: A person with a family history of osteopenia or osteoporosis has more than 50% chance of getting either osteopenia or osteoporosis.
  5. Lifestyle: Poor diet, excessive smoking, alcohol, lack of exercising etc. goes a long way in contributing towards these diseases.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4496 people found this helpful