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The Causes And Treatment Of Avascular Necrosis Of Femoral Head!

MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery
Orthopedic Doctor, Ratlam
The Causes And Treatment Of Avascular Necrosis Of Femoral Head!

Avascular Necrosis refers to a condition that affects the upper half of the leg, especially the femoral head. The femoral head receives less amount of blood supply. As bone is a living tissue, so when the blood supply gets reduced by a sufficient extent, it results in the bone dying out. Collapse of the femoral head takes place and if it is severe then collapse of the hip joint also takes place. It usually crops up as secondary problem to a health issue underlying or because of any previous injury.

Causes behind the problem-
Any kind of either traumatic or non-traumatic problem leads to the problem of Avascular Necrosis. Some of the causes include:

  1. This problem can be the result of having sustained a dislocated hip, wherein the femoral head has got dislodged from its joint.
  2. Close to 20% of people who suffer from dislocated hip, tend to develop avascular necrosis of femoral head.
  3. Excessive consumption of alcohol, chronic use of corticosteroids and any kind of damage to the arteries can result in the emergence of this problem.
  4. All the above-mentioned causes interfere with the breaking down of fatty substances. Thus the build up of fatty substances takes place and they get collected within the blood vessels, making them quite narrow. The narrower the blood vessels are, there is restricted blood flow to the femoral head.

Treatment
The primary goal is to help preserve the natural femoral head rather than getting it replaced. The treatment options include:

  1. Core Decompression: This involves decreasing the pressure inside the femoral head, which is achieved by way of drilling holes into the femoral head to create channels for new blood vessels for nourishing the affected areas of the hip.
  2. Physiotherapy: This happens to be a conservative treatment which aims to decrease the weight bearing load through the head of the femur but still this has not really been a successful method of treating the problem.
  3. Total Hip Joint Replacement: It is the final treatment for late stage of Avascular Necrosis which completely eradicates the problem from the root.

No matter what approach one takes, finally the opinion of an orthopaedic surgeon is of paramount importance for ensuring that the condition is treated in the most effective manner.

5012 people found this helpful

Super Fact of the Day: Your thigh bone is stronger than concrete!

Dr.Jyoti Goel 93% (7197ratings)
MBBS, Diploma in Nutrition and Health Education (DNHE), Diploma in Clinical Cosmetology
General Physician, Noida
Super Fact of the Day: Your thigh bone is stronger than concrete!
Your thighbone is the longest and strongest bone in your body. Because your thighbone or femur is so strong, it generally takes a lot of force to break it, yet it gets fractured.

Would you like to share this interesting fact with family or friends? go ahead and share!
456 people found this helpful

Know More About Perthes Disease In Children!

MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Gurgaon
Know More About Perthes Disease In Children!

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the round head of thigh bone (femoral head) with the cup shaped socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis and Perthe’s Disease is an affliction of the hip joints in growing children. It is much more common in boys than girls, and occurs most commonly in children aged between 4 to 10 years. The cause of this problem is still unidentified.

In Perthes disease, changes affect the femoral head which can be seen on X-ray. These changes occur in three stages over 18 months to 2 years:

  1. The blood supply to part of the femoral head is disturbed, causing loss of bone cells.
  2. Softening and collapse of the affected bone
  3. Re-establishment of the blood supply, repair and remodeling of the femoral head.

Limping is the most common symptom. The limp may become more persistent and pain may develop. Examination of the child by the orthopaedic surgeon generally shows restriction of hip movement. The nature of Perthes disease is variable. Severity depends on the child’s age, and the extent of femoral head involvement. Older children, girls, and those with greater involvement of the femoral head are likely to require more complex treatment. Treatment aims to reduce pain and stiffness, and prevent femoral head deformity.

All children need regular review by the orthopaedic surgeon through the duration of the disease. Not all children require active treatment. Many will make a good recovery with only symptomatic treatment. This may involve restriction of activity such as running and high impact sports. Swimming is encouraged. Some children may require exercise in slings and springs, or the application of plaster casts to the lower limbs. Some children will require surgical management.

Children with Perthes Disease are otherwise healthy, but may be affected by physical restrictions. By middle age, one third of those affected have no symptoms, one third have intermittent hip pain, and one third would develop arthritis requiring treatment. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2381 people found this helpful

How To Treat Perthes Disease In Children?

Dr.Sanjay Kapoor 90% (234ratings)
M. Ch. (Orthopedic), MS - Orthopaedics, Diploma In Orthopaedics (D. Ortho), MBBS
Orthopedic Doctor, Gurgaon
How To Treat Perthes Disease In Children?

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the round head of thigh bone (femoral head) with the cup shaped socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis and Perthe’s Disease is an affliction of the hip joints in growing children. It is much more common in boys than girls, and occurs most commonly in children aged between 4 to 10 years. The cause of this problem is still unidentified.

In Perthes disease, changes affect the femoral head which can be seen on X-ray. These changes occur in three stages over 18 months to 2 years:

  1. The blood supply to part of the femoral head is disturbed, causing loss of bone cells.
  2. Softening and collapse of the affected bone
  3. Re-establishment of the blood supply, repair and remodeling of the femoral head.

Limping is the most common symptom. The limp may become more persistent and pain may develop. Examination of the child by the orthopaedic surgeon generally shows restriction of hip movement. The nature of Perthes disease is variable. Severity depends on the child’s age, and the extent of femoral head involvement. Older children, girls, and those with greater involvement of the femoral head are likely to require more complex treatment. Treatment aims to reduce pain and stiffness, and prevent femoral head deformity.

All children need regular review by the orthopaedic surgeon through the duration of the disease. Not all children require active treatment. Many will make a good recovery with only symptomatic treatment. This may involve restriction of activity such as running and high impact sports. Swimming is encouraged. Some children may require exercise in slings and springs, or the application of plaster casts to the lower limbs. Some children will require surgical management.

Children with Perthes Disease are otherwise healthy, but may be affected by physical restrictions. By middle age, one third of those affected have no symptoms, one third have intermittent hip pain, and one third would develop arthritis requiring treatment.

4252 people found this helpful

Perthes Disease In Children - What Can Possibly Lead To It?

MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Thane
Perthes Disease In Children - What Can Possibly Lead To It?

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the round head of thigh bone (femoral head) with the cup shaped socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis and Perthe’s Disease is an affliction of the hip joints in growing children. It is much more common in boys than girls, and occurs most commonly in children aged between 4 to 10 years. The cause of this problem is still unidentified.

In Perthes disease, changes affect the femoral head which can be seen on X-ray. These changes occur in three stages over 18 months to 2 years:

  1. The blood supply to part of the femoral head is disturbed, causing loss of bone cells.
  2. Softening and collapse of the affected bone
  3. Re-establishment of the blood supply, repair and remodeling of the femoral head.

Limping is the most common symptom. The limp may become more persistent and pain may develop. Examination of the child by the orthopaedic surgeon generally shows restriction of hip movement. The nature of Perthes disease is variable. Severity depends on the child’s age, and the extent of femoral head involvement. Older children, girls, and those with greater involvement of the femoral head are likely to require more complex treatment. Treatment aims to reduce pain and stiffness, and prevent femoral head deformity.

All children need regular review by the orthopaedic surgeon through the duration of the disease. Not all children require active treatment. Many will make a good recovery with only symptomatic treatment. This may involve restriction of activity such as running and high impact sports. Swimming is encouraged. Some children may require exercise in slings and springs, or the application of plaster casts to the lower limbs. Some children will require surgical management.

Children with Perthes Disease are otherwise healthy, but may be affected by physical restrictions. By middle age, one third of those affected have no symptoms, one third have intermittent hip pain, and one third would develop arthritis requiring treatment.

2634 people found this helpful

Perthes Disease In Children - Know More About It!

Dr.Ravi C V 90% (20ratings)
DNB, Fellowship in Pediatric Orthopedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Visakhapatnam
Perthes Disease In Children - Know More About It!

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the round head of thigh bone (femoral head) with the cup shaped socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis and Perthe’s Disease is an affliction of the hip joints in growing children. It is much more common in boys than girls, and occurs most commonly in children aged between 4 to 10 years. The cause of this problem is still unidentified.

In Perthes disease, changes affect the femoral head which can be seen on X-ray. These changes occur in three stages over 18 months to 2 years:

  1. The blood supply to part of the femoral head is disturbed, causing loss of bone cells.
  2. Softening and collapse of the affected bone
  3. Re-establishment of the blood supply, repair and remodeling of the femoral head.
  • Limping is the most common symptom. The limp may become more persistent and pain may develop. Examination of the child by the orthopaedic surgeon generally shows restriction of hip movement. The nature of Perthes disease is variable. Severity depends on the child’s age, and the extent of femoral head involvement. Older children, girls, and those with greater involvement of the femoral head are likely to require more complex treatment. Treatment aims to reduce pain and stiffness, and prevent femoral head deformity.
  • All children need regular review by the orthopaedic surgeon through the duration of the disease. Not all children require active treatment. Many will make a good recovery with only symptomatic treatment. This may involve restriction of activity such as running and high impact sports. Swimming is encouraged. Some children may require exercise in slings and springs, or the application of plaster casts to the lower limbs. Some children will require surgical management.
  • Children with Perthes Disease are otherwise healthy, but may be affected by physical restrictions. By middle age, one third of those affected have no symptoms, one third have intermittent hip pain, and one third would develop arthritis requiring treatment.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3979 people found this helpful

Perthes Disease - How Can You Help Your Child?

MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, DNB - Orthopaedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Pune
Perthes Disease - How Can You Help Your Child?

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the round head of thigh bone (femoral head) with the cup shaped socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis and Perthe’s Disease is an affliction of the hip joints in growing children. It is much more common in boys than girls, and occurs most commonly in children aged between 4 to 10 years. The cause of this problem is still unidentified.

In Perthes disease, changes affect the femoral head which can be seen on X-ray. These changes occur in three stages over 18 months to 2 years:

  1. The blood supply to part of the femoral head is disturbed, causing loss of bone cells.
  2. Softening and collapse of the affected bone
  3. Re-establishment of the blood supply, repair and remodeling of the femoral head.

  • Limping is the most common symptom. The limp may become more persistent and pain may develop. Examination of the child by the orthopaedic surgeon generally shows restriction of hip movement. The nature of Perthes disease is variable. Severity depends on the child’s age, and the extent of femoral head involvement. Older children, girls, and those with greater involvement of the femoral head are likely to require more complex treatment. Treatment aims to reduce pain and stiffness, and prevent femoral head deformity.
  • All children need regular review by the orthopaedic surgeon through the duration of the disease. Not all children require active treatment. Many will make a good recovery with only symptomatic treatment. This may involve restriction of activity such as running and high impact sports. Swimming is encouraged. Some children may require exercise in slings and springs, or the application of plaster casts to the lower limbs. Some children will require surgical management.
  • Children with Perthes Disease are otherwise healthy, but may be affected by physical restrictions. By middle age, one third of those affected have no symptoms, one third have intermittent hip pain, and one third would develop arthritis requiring treatment.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2471 people found this helpful

What Is Perthes Disease?

Dr.Gaurav Khera 91% (30ratings)
MBBS, Diploma In Orthopaedics (D. Ortho), DNB - Orthopedics, Mch
Orthopedic Doctor, Delhi
What Is Perthes Disease?

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the round head of thigh bone (femoral head) with the cup shaped socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis and Perthe’s Disease is an affliction of the hip joints in growing children. It is much more common in boys than girls, and occurs most commonly in children aged between 4 to 10 years. The cause of this problem is still unidentified.

In Perthes disease, changes affect the femoral head which can be seen on X-ray. These changes occur in three stages over 18 months to 2 years:

  1. The blood supply to part of the femoral head is disturbed, causing loss of bone cells.
  2. Softening and collapse of the affected bone
  3. Re-establishment of the blood supply, repair and remodeling of the femoral head.

Limping is the most common symptom. The limp may become more persistent and pain may develop. Examination of the child by the orthopaedic surgeon generally shows restriction of hip movement. The nature of Perthes disease is variable. Severity depends on the child’s age, and the extent of femoral head involvement. Older children, girls, and those with greater involvement of the femoral head are likely to require more complex treatment. Treatment aims to reduce pain and stiffness, and prevent femoral head deformity.

All children need regular review by the orthopaedic surgeon through the duration of the disease. Not all children require active treatment. Many will make a good recovery with only symptomatic treatment. This may involve restriction of activity such as running and high impact sports. Swimming is encouraged. Some children may require exercise in slings and springs, or the application of plaster casts to the lower limbs. Some children will require surgical management.

Children with Perthes Disease are otherwise healthy, but may be affected by physical restrictions. By middle age, one third of those affected have no symptoms, one third have intermittent hip pain, and one third would develop arthritis requiring treatment.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2576 people found this helpful

Know More About Perthes Disease In Children!

Dr.Ravi C V 90% (20ratings)
DNB, Fellowship in Pediatric Orthopedics
Orthopedic Doctor, Visakhapatnam
Know More About Perthes Disease In Children!

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the round head of thigh bone (femoral head) with the cup shaped socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis and Perthe’s Disease is an affliction of the hip joints in growing children. It is much more common in boys than girls, and occurs most commonly in children aged between 4 to 10 years. The cause of this problem is still unidentified.

In Perthes disease, changes affect the femoral head which can be seen on X-ray. These changes occur in three stages over 18 months to 2 years:

  1. The blood supply to part of the femoral head is disturbed, causing loss of bone cells.
  2. Softening and collapse of the affected bone
  3. Re-establishment of the blood supply, repair and remodeling of the femoral head.

  • Limping is the most common symptom. The limp may become more persistent and pain may develop. Examination of the child by the orthopaedic surgeon generally shows restriction of hip movement. The nature of Perthes disease is variable. Severity depends on the child’s age, and the extent of femoral head involvement. Older children, girls, and those with greater involvement of the femoral head are likely to require more complex treatment. Treatment aims to reduce pain and stiffness, and prevent femoral head deformity.
  • All children need regular review by the orthopaedic surgeon through the duration of the disease. Not all children require active treatment. Many will make a good recovery with only symptomatic treatment. This may involve restriction of activity such as running and high impact sports. Swimming is encouraged. Some children may require exercise in slings and springs, or the application of plaster casts to the lower limbs. Some children will require surgical management.
  • Children with Perthes Disease are otherwise healthy, but may be affected by physical restrictions. By middle age, one third of those affected have no symptoms, one third have intermittent hip pain, and one third would develop arthritis requiring treatment.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4443 people found this helpful

Perthes Disease In Children - Things To Know!

MS - Orthopaedics, M.Ch - Orthopaedics, FRCS, MBBS
Orthopedic Doctor, Pune
Perthes Disease In Children - Things To Know!

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint made up of the round head of thigh bone (femoral head) with the cup shaped socket (acetabulum) of the pelvis and Perthe’s Disease is an affliction of the hip joints in growing children. It is much more common in boys than girls, and occurs most commonly in children aged between 4 to 10 years. The cause of this problem is still unidentified.

In Perthes disease, changes affect the femoral head which can be seen on X-ray. These changes occur in three stages over 18 months to 2 years:

  1. The blood supply to part of the femoral head is disturbed, causing loss of bone cells.
  2. Softening and collapse of the affected bone
  3. Re-establishment of the blood supply, repair and remodeling of the femoral head.
  • Limping is the most common symptom. The limp may become more persistent and pain may develop. Examination of the child by the orthopaedic surgeon generally shows restriction of hip movement. The nature of Perthes disease is variable. Severity depends on the child’s age, and the extent of femoral head involvement. Older children, girls, and those with greater involvement of the femoral head are likely to require more complex treatment. Treatment aims to reduce pain and stiffness, and prevent femoral head deformity.
  • All children need regular review by the orthopaedic surgeon through the duration of the disease. Not all children require active treatment. Many will make a good recovery with only symptomatic treatment. This may involve restriction of activity such as running and high impact sports. Swimming is encouraged. Some children may require exercise in slings and springs, or the application of plaster casts to the lower limbs. Some children will require surgical management.
  • Children with Perthes Disease are otherwise healthy, but may be affected by physical restrictions. By middle age, one third of those affected have no symptoms, one third have intermittent hip pain, and one third would develop arthritis requiring treatment.
2499 people found this helpful