Common Specialities
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Bo Lax 5Mg Tablet Tips

Myth - Breast feeding spoils the Mother's figure

Not at all! Breasts sag from obesity and lax muscle tone - not because of nursing a baby. To the contrary, the baby's sucking leads to the uterus contracting, which helps restore the belly to its normal position quite quickly. What you really need is a well fitting bra to give you support, with nursing flaps to allow your baby easy access to your breasts.
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Eyebags And Homeopathic Treatment

Eyebags And Homeopathic Treatment

Homeopathy does offers certain medicines for swelling under the eyelids or around the eyelids. Medicines like kali carb, apis, china are often used. But the success of treatment depends on conditions like whether the swelling is oedematous in nature, or there is collection of fat, or there is lax tissue, or if this is a hereditary feature. If the eye bags show any variation in size with the day then they have a much better prognosis with homeopathy.

If the eye bags have developed after some illness or relatively recently, you may get benefit from constitutional treatment, covering you as a person.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Do you have any symptoms like snoring, interrupted sleep, unrefreshened sleep, morning headaches, daytime sleepiness etc, if yes it further supports the diagnosis.
It is a condition characterised by obstruction of upper airway especially during sleep due to lax airway and narrowing of airway due to obesity.
Basically, obstruction of upper airway leads to temporary stoppage of respiration, increased sympathetic drive and increased pulse rate. Also, other reason for pulse rate rise is deconditioning as you are not accustomed to activities.
Investigation
ENT examination if you have any symptoms of nasal stuffiness, recurrent tonsillitis to rule nasal causes of obstruction.

Thyroid function test
Lipid profile and sugar, hba1c
Vitamin D
Polysomnography which is sleep study to confirm the diagnosis and extent of disease, pressure of cpap needed.
In treatment, first thing weight loss. You need to have low fat, calorie diet in order to loose weight. Cure for this is weight loss.
Secondly, cpap which is mask and device, and pressure during inspiration and expiration during sleep in order keep your airways patent and avoid this from happening.
Also, regular exercises is very important. Chest physiotherapy and yoga will be helpful.

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Patients with acidity should avoid chocolates and peppermint

Persistent acidity is usually due to reflux of acid from the stomach into the food
pipe. Mild cases of acidity reflux can usually be managed with lifestyle and dietary modifications along with antacids, H2 blockers and proton pump inhibitors.

However, patients in whom lifestyle management along with empirical treatment is unsuccessful or who have symptoms suggestive of complicated diseases should undergo endoscopy to rule out cancer of the food pipe, a condition linked with persistent acidity.

Symptoms that may suggest complicated disease include loss of appetite, loss of weight and difficulty in swallowing food, bleeding and signs of systemic illness.

Lifestyle changes for reflux involve elevation of head and of the body, avoidance of food before sleep and avoidance of food which makes the food pipe valve lax. The examples of such foods include fatty food, chocolates, peppermint and excessive intake of alcohol.

Hurry, worry and curry are the three main factors that cause acidity apart from alcohol and smoking.

People with acidity should consume less of fermented, sour, salty and pungent foods.
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6 Benefits of Slowing Down Your Life Will Make You Healthy and Happy

6 Benefits of Slowing Down Your Life Will Make You Healthy and Happy

The pressing urge to do loads in a short span of time, to plan life in a day, to see dreams unfurl into reality at the slightest of efforts inundates millions across the world. It is neither about the goals one sets before oneself nor about rational expectations arising from the awareness of one's capabilities. The problem runs deeper. Happiness and health are two elemental factors discerning the quality of your life. Happiness is directly proportional to your personal health. Neglecting one will affect the other. The best way to cope in the given situation is to take a detour from the overriding rat race. While others are in a hurry, you must slow down and care to nurture your mind and body.

Take a look at the benefits of slowing down:

  1. It will give you ample time to interact: Moving out of your comfort zone in order to exchange ideas with colleagues or friends plays an eminent role in shaping your personality. Interaction provides a person with food for thought. Therefore slowing down a little will encourage a free flow of countless ideas.
  2. It will encourage you to pursue a hobby: Hobbies keep you alive. You should take out time to pursue an interest. This is a tried and tested way of rekindling happiness in one's life.
  3. It will make you attentive towards others: A fast life shelters you within its clutches. You fail to take note of the changes in and around you. Going slow will let you take care of your loved ones.
  4. It will enable you to see your inimitability: Once you slow down, you'll find time to introspect and retrospect as well. A person can come to realize how unique he or she is in this vast scope of things.
  5. It will improve your sex life: Dopamine is the chief chemical that regulates a person's sexual desires. Increased levels of stress can hamper the production of dopamine making you lax about sex. Taking an easy pace can add zing to your sex life.
  6. It will keep your heart healthy: Being overly hyper about delay subjects you to the risk of heart diseases. You should never be frantic about plans; this can lead to high blood pressure or can even cause severe harm to your heart health. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Psychiatrist.
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Cervical Cerclage (Cervical Stitch Operation)

Cervical Cerclage (Cervical Stitch Operation)

Cervical Cerclage (Cervical Stitch Operation)

This is also called as cervical stitch operation. The cervix is the mouth or entry point of the uterus which extends into the vagina.

It is advised in cases where a woman may have a previous second-trimester pregnancy loss or some procedure done on the cervix earlier leading to weakness of the cervix. This weakness may lead to a lax birth passage through which a premature baby can slip out accidently, causing a miscarriage or premature birth.

What is it?

It is an operation done to surgically close the cervix so that the baby does not slip out through the open passage. A small suture is passed through the cervix and tied similar to the way one would tie a filled balloon. This stitch is expected to hold the pregnancy and the baby securely inside till we remove the stitch near delivery.

When should it be done?

An emergency stitch may have to be applied anytime during pregnancy when your doctor feels that the cervix is showing signs of opening. These signs may appear on ultrasound scan or while examining your cervix.

An elective procedure is usually done between 12-14 weeks of pregnancy.

What should I expect before the surgery?


You would be admitted to the hospital and put on some intravenous medication to quieten the uterus. Antibiotics may be started on the basis of your vaginal culture reports.

Surgery is usually performed under general anesthesia and takes around 30 minutes.

What happens after the surgery?

Slight bleeding and cramps in the stomach may happen after the surgery and you would be given medications to make you comfortable.

One usually needs to stay in the hospital for one or two days after the surgery to look for signs of miscarriage or any other complication.

Once you go home you should avoid exertion, vaginal intercourse and lift heavy weights( not more than 5-8 kgs) for the rest of the pregnancy.

Please inform your doctor immediately if you have any excessive discharge from the vagina/ fever/ pain in your belly or any other discomfort.

You must follow your doctor's advice on regular checkups and other investigations during the rest of the pregnancy.

When do we remove the stitch?

The stitch remains in place for the rest of the pregnancy till around 37 weeks. It may have to be removed earlier if you start your contractions or go into preterm labor.

The stitch is usually removed without any anesthesia but if there is any problem in its removal because of its position or extra tissue growing over it, then a short anesthesia may be required to cut it.

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How Slowing Down Your Life Will Make You Healthier & Happier

How Slowing Down Your Life Will Make You Healthier & Happier

The pressing urge to do loads in a short span of time, to plan life in a day, to see dreams unfurl into reality at the slightest of efforts inundates millions across the world. It is neither about the goals one sets before oneself nor about rational expectations arising from the awareness of one's capabilities. The problem runs deeper. Happiness and health are two elemental factors discerning the quality of your life. Happiness is directly proportional to your personal health. Neglecting one will affect the other. The best way to cope in the given situation is to take a detour from the overriding rat race. While others are in a hurry, you must slow down and care to nurture your mind and body.

Take a look at the benefits of slowing down:

  1. It will give you ample time to interact: Moving out of your comfort zone in order to exchange ideas with colleagues or friends plays an eminent role in shaping your personality. Interaction provides a person with food for thought. Therefore slowing down a little will encourage a free flow of countless ideas.
  2. It will encourage you to pursue a hobby: Hobbies keep you alive. You should take out time to pursue an interest. This is a tried and tested way of rekindling happiness in one's life.
  3. It will make you attentive towards others: A fast life shelters you within its clutches. You fail to take note of the changes in and around you. Going slow will let you take care of your loved ones.
  4. It will enable you to see your inimitability: Once you slow down, you'll find time to introspect and retrospect as well. A person can come to realize how unique he or she is in this vast scope of things.
  5. It will improve your sex life: Dopamine is the chief chemical that regulates a person's sexual desires. Increased levels of stress can hamper the production of dopamine making you lax about sex. Taking an easy pace can add zing to your sex life.
  6. It will keep your heart healthy: Being overly hyper about delay subjects you to the risk of heart diseases. You should never be frantic about plans; this can lead to high blood pressure or can even cause severe harm to your heart health.

Related Tip: "Get Better Sleep"

3954 people found this helpful

Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - Know Everything About It!

Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - Know Everything About It!

What is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH, is a condition that affects the hip joint in newborns and young children. The hip is like a ball-and-cup, formed by the round top of the thigh bone - called the femur - and a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis. The hip joint is stable in spite of its large range of motion and is kept in place by ligaments and other soft tissue structures. The normal infant hip is not mature at birth but develops into a strong and stable joint as the child grows.

What happens in hip dysplasia?

In DDH, the hip does not develop normally as the cup and ball are either partially or completely out of alignment. DDH can vary from mild to severe depending on whether the cup is shallow, soft tissue structures are lax or a combination of all. These problems may cause the hip to become unstable, and even come out of the joint. This is known as a dislocated hip and is believed to occur in around one in 1000 infants. One or both hips can be affected. DDH isn't painful in babies and young children. Untreated DDH can result in limping in young children. This can progress to hip pain and arthritis at a later date.

How common is it?

DDH is more common in girls and first-born children. It's more likely to occur if there's a family history or if the baby was breech. Swaddling or wrapping a baby's legs too tightly can also lead to DDH. Certain traditional practices like wrapping the children, etc. are known to increase the risk, while carrying them with limbs separated apart is known to decrease the risk of dysplasia. All newborns should have both hips carefully examined by a health professional. 

Treatment options

Treatment depends on the child's age and the severity of the condition. Young babies with confirmed DDH are usually treated in a brace or harness that holds the legs apart. This helps the hip socket to deepen and the hip to become stable with growth. Regular monitoring of the hip position is necessary to ensure good outcomes. Surgery may be necessary if brace treatment is unsuccessful, or if a hip dislocation is first noticed when the child is older.

What is the long-term outlook?

Most infants who are diagnosed and treated early do not have any hip problems in later life. Earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome, as late diagnosis often requires surgical treatment and can mean a higher likelihood of ongoing hip problems. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2739 people found this helpful

How Common Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip Is Treated?

How Common Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip Is Treated?

What is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH, is a condition that affects the hip joint in newborns and young children. The hip is like a ball-and-cup, formed by the round top of the thigh bone - called the femur - and a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis. The hip joint is stable in spite of its large range of motion and is kept in place by ligaments and other soft tissue structures. The normal infant hip is not mature at birth but develops into a strong and stable joint as the child grows.

What happens in hip dysplasia?

In DDH, the hip does not develop normally as the cup and ball are either partially or completely out of alignment. DDH can vary from mild to severe depending on whether the cup is shallow, soft tissue structures are lax or a combination of all. These problems may cause the hip to become unstable, and even come out of the joint. This is known as a dislocated hip and is believed to occur in around one in 1000 infants. One or both hips can be affected. DDH isn't painful in babies and young children. Untreated DDH can result in limping in young children. This can progress to hip pain and arthritis at a later date.

How common is it?

DDH is more common in girls and first-born children. It's more likely to occur if there's a family history or if the baby was breech. Swaddling or wrapping a baby's legs too tightly can also lead to DDH. Certain traditional practices like wrapping the children, etc. are known to increase the risk, while carrying them with limbs separated apart is known to decrease the risk of dysplasia. All newborns should have both hips carefully examined by a health professional. 

Treatment options

Treatment depends on the child's age and the severity of the condition. Young babies with confirmed DDH are usually treated in a brace or harness that holds the legs apart. This helps the hip socket to deepen and the hip to become stable with growth. Regular monitoring of the hip position is necessary to ensure good outcomes. Surgery may be necessary if brace treatment is unsuccessful, or if a hip dislocation is first noticed when the child is older.

What is the long-term outlook?

Most infants who are diagnosed and treated early do not have any hip problems in later life. Earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome, as late diagnosis often requires surgical treatment and can mean a higher likelihood of ongoing hip problems.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4334 people found this helpful

Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - How Common It Is?

Developmental Dysplasia Of Hip - How Common It Is?

What is Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip?

Developmental dysplasia of the hip or DDH, is a condition that affects the hip joint in newborns and young children. The hip is like a ball-and-cup, formed by the round top of the thigh bone - called the femur - and a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis. The hip joint is stable in spite of its large range of motion and is kept in place by ligaments and other soft tissue structures. The normal infant hip is not mature at birth but develops into a strong and stable joint as the child grows.

What happens in hip dysplasia?

In DDH, the hip does not develop normally as the cup and ball are either partially or completely out of alignment. DDH can vary from mild to severe depending on whether the cup is shallow, soft tissue structures are lax or a combination of all. These problems may cause the hip to become unstable, and even come out of the joint. This is known as a dislocated hip and is believed to occur in around one in 1000 infants. One or both hips can be affected. DDH isn't painful in babies and young children. Untreated DDH can result in limping in young children. This can progress to hip pain and arthritis at a later date.

How common is it?

DDH is more common in girls and first-born children. It's more likely to occur if there's a family history or if the baby was breech. Swaddling or wrapping a baby's legs too tightly can also lead to DDH. Certain traditional practices like wrapping the children, etc. are known to increase the risk, while carrying them with limbs separated apart is known to decrease the risk of dysplasia. All newborns should have both hips carefully examined by a health professional. 

Treatment options

Treatment depends on the child's age and the severity of the condition. Young babies with confirmed DDH are usually treated in a brace or harness that holds the legs apart. This helps the hip socket to deepen and the hip to become stable with growth. Regular monitoring of the hip position is necessary to ensure good outcomes. Surgery may be necessary if brace treatment is unsuccessful, or if a hip dislocation is first noticed when the child is older.

What is the long-term outlook?

Most infants who are diagnosed and treated early do not have any hip problems in later life. Earlier the diagnosis and treatment, the better the outcome, as late diagnosis often requires surgical treatment and can mean a higher likelihood of ongoing hip problems.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3471 people found this helpful