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Bitaquine DS 500mg Tablet Tips

Low Level Laser Therapy : Hair Loss Management

MBBS, MD - Dermatology , Venereology & Leprosy
Dermatologist, Bangalore
Low Level Laser Therapy : Hair Loss Management

- [ 1] low level laser therapy (lllt)
- [ 2] the ability of lasers to induce hair growth was incidentally noted as early as 1967 when mester et al used lllt to treat cancer in mice and excessive hair growth happened to them.
- [ 3] increased atp production and modulation of reactive oxygen species (ros) induced cell stimulation.
- [ 4] hairmax laser comb in 2007 got clearance from fda for male pattern baldness and 2011 for treatment of female pattern hair loss.
- [ 5] 655 nm wavelength shows improvement in intermediate alopecias since effective photobiostimulation depends upon minimum number of hair present.
- [ 6] moreover, combining lllt with topical minoxidil and oral finasteride may act synergistic to enhance hair regrowth.
- [ 7] due to the known beneficial effect on wound healing, it is conceivable that lllt as an adjunctive therapy in hair transplant surgery may also reduce postoperative shedding, reduce healing time and increased graft patency.
 

3 people found this helpful

Dr.Sajeev Kumar 92% (39990ratings)
C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
Malaria's adverse impact on reproductive health

Malaria can have a serious impact on reproductive health, experts said on the occasion of World Malaria Day today as they pointed out that, although rare, the disease can hamper semen quality in males and increase miscarriage risks in women.

When a man suffers from high-grade fever during malaria, he may develop severe azoospermia (no measurable level of sperm in semen), necrozoospermia (sperm in semen is either dead or immobile) or oligospermia (low sperm count),

However, in most of the cases, recovery occurs once the person is cured of malaria. Thus, success rates are comparatively low among couples who try to conceive around the period when the male partner is affected with malaria or has just recovered from the disease.

"Not many are aware that a parasitic disease like malaria can affect the reproductive health of both men and women. We sometimes see that quinine and chloroquine, the anti-malarial alkaloids that are used to treat the disease, impact the quality of sperm and blood levels of some reproductive hormones in males.

"In some cases, they also hamper the egg quality in females. Malaria also increases miscarriage risks. However, more research needs to be done to ascertain the exact effects of malaria on male and female infertility"

"The vulnerable group when it comes to malaria are children, pregnant women and the elderly. Malaria in pregnancy can cause a low birth weight infant, abortions and premature delivery and should not be ignored and treated early.

"An unexpected abortion of this nature can cause long-term infertility in patients"

Being diagnosed with malaria during pregnancy can harm both the mother and the unborn foetus. It can cause severe parasitic infection and anaemia in the foetus thus becoming a major cause of maternal mortality.

The disease can also cause premature birth or low weight, which leads to increased risk of neonatal mortality.

Malaria - Signs You Should Be Aware Of!

Dr.M.P.S Saluja 92% (364ratings)
MD, House Job Certificate ( SKIN & STD) , MBBS
General Physician, Gurgaon
Malaria - Signs You Should Be Aware Of!

Mosquitoes might be tiny creatures, but are responsible for some of the most dreadful diseases, one of them is malaria. Malaria is caused by a parasite that is transmitted through mosquito bites directly or from mother to unborn baby and through blood transfusions. Very widely spread in the Asian and African continents, people travelling here are very cautious of this disease. In areas that are notorious for mosquito infestations, the local people also take preventive measures to ensure mosquito breeding is prevented or at least minimised.

Spread of the disease: When a mosquito bites an infected person, it picks up the parasite from the person and when it next bites another person, the infection is also transmitted. From there, the parasite travels to the liver and into the bloodstream before reaching another individual. While all people are prone to getting the infection, elderly people, children, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people are at greater risk. Also, new travellers are at greater risk than local people, who are to some extent immune to mosquito bites.

Symptoms: The disease is characterised by moderate to severe shaking chills which are more common in the evening, high fever, profuse sweating, headache, vomiting, and diarrhoea. Quite often, there is about a 4-week gap between the time of the mosquito bite and the onset of symptoms. However, in many people, the disease could lie dormant and symptoms manifest when the immunity is severely lowered.
With the gradual progression of the disease, more severe symptoms could evolve as below, and that is when malaria becomes life-threatening.

  1. Cerebral malaria: Once the parasites enter the bloodstream, they can block the minor blood vessels in the brain leading to cerebral oedema and even brain damage. It could eventually result in coma.
  2. Anaemia: There is large-scale destruction of red blood cells, leading to severe anaemia and weakness and fatigue
  3. Breathing problems: Similarly, accumulation of fluid in the lung spaces can lead to pulmonary oedema which causes difficulty breathing and lung failure.
  4. Organ failure: Blood flow blockage to other vital organs like kidneys, liver, and spleen are also possible. The spleen may rupture leading to severe haemorrhage.
  5. Low blood sugar: The malarial parasite per se and the most commonly used medicine (quinine) are both known to cause low blood sugar levels. This can result in coma and even death.

Once the diagnosis is confirmed, treatment usually consists of chloroquine, Mefloquine, quinine sulfate, or hydroxychloroquine. There are various drug-resistant forms of malaria, and they may require combination therapy.
Prevention assumes greater significance with travellers going for vaccines prior to visiting these areas. Even the local people should find ways to avoid breeding of mosquitoes, use mosquito repellents and nets to avoid the infection.

5744 people found this helpful

Malaria - Know How This Disease Spreads!

Dr.Rohith P A 92% (57ratings)
MBBS
General Physician, Chennai
Malaria - Know How This Disease Spreads!

Mosquitoes might be tiny creatures, but are responsible for some of the most dreadful diseases, one of them is malaria. Malaria is caused by a parasite that is transmitted through mosquito bites directly or from mother to unborn baby and through blood transfusions. Very widely spread in the Asian and African continents, people travelling here are very cautious of this disease. In areas that are notorious for mosquito infestations, the local people also take preventive measures to ensure mosquito breeding is prevented or at least minimised.

Spread of the disease: When a mosquito bites an infected person, it picks up the parasite from the person and when it next bites another person, the infection is also transmitted. From there, the parasite travels to the liver and into the bloodstream before reaching another individual. While all people are prone to getting the infection, elderly people, children, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people are at greater risk. Also, new travellers are at greater risk than local people, who are to some extent immune to mosquito bites.

Symptoms: The disease is characterised by moderate to severe shaking chills which are more common in the evening, high fever, profuse sweating, headache, vomiting, and diarrhoea. Quite often, there is about a 4-week gap between the time of the mosquito bite and the onset of symptoms. However, in many people, the disease could lie dormant and symptoms manifest when the immunity is severely lowered.
With the gradual progression of the disease, more severe symptoms could evolve as below, and that is when malaria becomes life-threatening.

  1. Cerebral malaria: Once the parasites enter the bloodstream, they can block the minor blood vessels in the brain leading to cerebral oedema and even brain damage. It could eventually result in coma.
  2. Anaemia: There is large-scale destruction of red blood cells, leading to severe anaemia and weakness and fatigue
  3. Breathing problems: Similarly, accumulation of fluid in the lung spaces can lead to pulmonary oedema which causes difficulty breathing and lung failure.
  4. Organ failure: Blood flow blockage to other vital organs like kidneys, liver, and spleen are also possible. The spleen may rupture leading to severe haemorrhage.
  5. Low blood sugar: The malarial parasite per se and the most commonly used medicine (quinine) are both known to cause low blood sugar levels. This can result in coma and even death.

Once the diagnosis is confirmed, treatment usually consists of chloroquine, Mefloquine, quinine sulfate, or hydroxychloroquine. There are various drug-resistant forms of malaria, and they may require combination therapy.
Prevention assumes greater significance with travellers going for vaccines prior to visiting these areas. Even the local people should find ways to avoid breeding of mosquitoes, use mosquito repellents and nets to avoid the infection. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4796 people found this helpful

Malaria - What Are The Types Of It?

Dr.Debasish Pal 90% (124ratings)
MBBS
General Physician, Kolkata
Malaria - What Are The Types Of It?

Mosquitoes might be tiny creatures, but are responsible for some of the most dreadful diseases, one of them is malaria. Malaria is caused by a parasite that is transmitted through mosquito bites directly or from mother to unborn baby and through blood transfusions. Very widely spread in the Asian and African continents, people travelling here are very cautious of this disease. In areas that are notorious for mosquito infestations, the local people also take preventive measures to ensure mosquito breeding is prevented or at least minimised.

Spread of the disease: When a mosquito bites an infected person, it picks up the parasite from the person and when it next bites another person, the infection is also transmitted. From there, the parasite travels to the liver and into the bloodstream before reaching another individual. While all people are prone to getting the infection, elderly people, children, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people are at greater risk. Also, new travellers are at greater risk than local people, who are to some extent immune to mosquito bites.

Symptoms: The disease is characterised by moderate to severe shaking chills which are more common in the evening, high fever, profuse sweating, headache, vomiting, and diarrhoea. Quite often, there is about a 4-week gap between the time of the mosquito bite and the onset of symptoms. However, in many people, the disease could lie dormant and symptoms manifest when the immunity is severely lowered.

With the gradual progression of the disease, more severe symptoms could evolve as below, and that is when malaria becomes life threatening.

  1. Cerebral malaria: Once the parasites enter the bloodstream, they can block the minor blood vessels in the brain leading to cerebral oedema and even brain damage. It could eventually result in coma.
  2. Anaemia: There is large-scale destruction of red blood cells, leading to severe anaemia and weakness and fatigue
  3. Breathing problems: Similarly, accumulation of fluid in the lung spaces can lead to pulmonary oedema which causes difficulty breathing and lung failure.
  4. Organ failure: Blood flow blockage to other vital organs like kidneys, liver, and spleen are also possible. The spleen may rupture leading to severe haemorrhage.
  5. Low blood sugar: The malarial parasite per se and the most commonly used medicine (quinine) are both known to cause low blood sugar levels. This can result in coma and even death.

Once the diagnosis is confirmed, treatment usually consists of chloroquineMefloquine, quinine sulfate, or hydroxychloroquine. There are various drug-resistant forms of malaria, and they may require combination therapy.

Prevention assumes greater significance with travellers going for vaccines prior to visiting these areas. Even the local people should find ways to avoid breeding of mosquitoes, use mosquito repellents and nets to avoid the infection.

3700 people found this helpful

Malaria - Know Its Symptoms!

Dr.Riyaz A Bhat 92% (11ratings)
MD - Medicine, Diabetologist, Thyroidologist & Endocrinologist
General Physician, Srinagar
Malaria - Know Its Symptoms!

Mosquitoes might be tiny creatures, but are responsible for some of the most dreadful diseases, one of them is malaria. Malaria is caused by a parasite that is transmitted through mosquito bites directly or from mother to unborn baby and through blood transfusions. Very widely spread in the Asian and African continents, people travelling here are very cautious of this disease. In areas that are notorious for mosquito infestations, the local people also take preventive measures to ensure mosquito breeding is prevented or at least minimised.

Spread of the disease: When a mosquito bites an infected person, it picks up the parasite from the person and when it next bites another person, the infection is also transmitted. From there, the parasite travels to the liver and into the bloodstream before reaching another individual. While all people are prone to getting the infection, elderly people, children, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people are at greater risk. Also, new travellers are at greater risk than local people, who are to some extent immune to mosquito bites.

Symptoms: The disease is characterised by moderate to severe shaking chills which are more common in the evening, high fever, profuse sweating, headache, vomiting, and diarrhoea. Quite often, there is about a 4-week gap between the time of the mosquito bite and the onset of symptoms. However, in many people, the disease could lie dormant and symptoms manifest when the immunity is severely lowered.
With the gradual progression of the disease, more severe symptoms could evolve as below, and that is when malaria becomes life-threatening.

  1. Cerebral malaria: Once the parasites enter the bloodstream, they can block the minor blood vessels in the brain leading to cerebral oedema and even brain damage. It could eventually result in coma.
  2. Anaemia: There is large-scale destruction of red blood cells, leading to severe anaemia and weakness and fatigue
  3. Breathing problems: Similarly, accumulation of fluid in the lung spaces can lead to pulmonary oedema which causes difficulty breathing and lung failure.
  4. Organ failure: Blood flow blockage to other vital organs like kidneys, liver, and spleen are also possible. The spleen may rupture leading to severe haemorrhage.
  5. Low blood sugar: The malarial parasite per se and the most commonly used medicine (quinine) are both known to cause low blood sugar levels. This can result in coma and even death.

Once the diagnosis is confirmed, treatment usually consists of chloroquine, Mefloquine, quinine sulfate, or hydroxychloroquine. There are various drug-resistant forms of malaria, and they may require combination therapy.
Prevention assumes greater significance with travellers going for vaccines prior to visiting these areas. Even the local people should find ways to avoid breeding of mosquitoes, use mosquito repellents and nets to avoid the infection.

3427 people found this helpful

Are You Aware Of These Symptoms Of Malaria?

Dr.Dinesh Chandra Pant 89% (321ratings)
DOMS, MBBS
General Physician, Gurgaon
Are You Aware Of These Symptoms Of Malaria?

Malaria refers to the disease transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito. The primary agent of transmission of this disease is the ‘Anopheles’ mosquito. This particular breed of mosquito carries the species causing organism, a parasitic protozoan, known as ‘Plasmodium species’.

The parasite, upon entering the bloodstream, attaches itself to the liver. It is at this location that the parasite matures and after a few days begins to infect the red blood cells that are secreted by the liver. The red blood cells that are infected tend to explode in about forty eight to seventy two hours due to the rapid multiplication of parasites inside them. The subtropical regions and regions that exist in a broad band around the equator are known to be the hotspots of species.

Symptoms

Upon being infected, the symptoms and signs show up within 10 days to 4 weeks. Some of the general symptoms include:

  1. Nausea

  2. High fever

  3. Headache

  4. Extreme sweating

  5. Moderate to severe chills

  6. Vomiting

  7. Anaemia

  8. Diarrhoea

  9. Pain in muscles

  10. Blood in stools

In some cases, malaria can lead to further severe complications, such as:

  1. Kidney, spleen or liver failure

  2. Cerebral malaria (swollen blood vessels in the brain)

  3. Low blood sugar

  4. Pulmonary oedema (fluid accumulation in the lungs which causes breathing difficulties)

The medications administered for malaria depend on factors such as:

  1. Severity of the infection

  2. Physical conditions such as allergies, pregnancy and other health problems,

  3. Age

Some of the most common medicines used to address malaria include:

  1. Chloroquine

  2. Malarone

  3. Doxycycline

  4. Quinine sulphate

  5. Mefloquine

  6. Hydroxychloroquine

  7. A mix of Proguanil and Atovaquone

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3530 people found this helpful

Malaria - Signs You Must Not Ignore!

Dr.Vishwas Madhav Thakur 93% (919ratings)
MBBS, AFIH, PGDMLS, MD-HRM, MD-HM
General Physician, Gurgaon
Malaria - Signs You Must Not Ignore!

Mosquitoes might be tiny creatures, but are responsible for some of the most dreadful diseases, one of them is malaria. The major causes of malaria is a parasite that is transmitted through mosquito bites directly or from mother to unborn baby and through blood transfusions. Very widely spread in the Asian and African continents, people travelling here are very cautious of this disease. In areas that are notorious for mosquito infestations, the local people also take preventive measures to ensure mosquito breeding is prevented or at least minimised.

Spread of the disease: When a mosquito bites an infected person, it picks up the parasite from the person and when it next bites another person, the infection is also transmitted. From there, the parasite travels to the liver and into the bloodstream before reaching another individual. While all people are prone to getting the infection, elderly people, children, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people are at greater risk. Also, new travellers are at greater risk than local people, who are to some extent immune to mosquito bites.

Symptoms: The disease is characterised by moderate to severe shaking chills which are more common in the evening, high fever, profuse sweating, headache, vomiting, and diarrhoea. Quite often, there is about a 4-week gap between the time of the mosquito bite and the onset of symptoms. However, in many people, the disease could lie dormant and symptoms manifest when the immunity is severely lowered.

With the gradual progression of the disease, more severe symptoms could evolve as below, and that is when malaria becomes life threatening.

  1. Cerebral malaria: Once the parasites enter the bloodstream, they can block the minor blood vessels in the brain leading to cerebral oedema and even brain damage. It could eventually result in coma.
  2. Anaemia: There is large-scale destruction of red blood cells, leading to severe anaemia and weakness and fatigue
  3. Breathing problems: Similarly, accumulation of fluid in the lung spaces can lead to pulmonary oedema which causes difficulty breathing and lung failure.
  4. Organ failure: Blood flow blockage to other vital organs like kidneys, liver, and spleen are also possible. The spleen may rupture leading to severe haemorrhage.
  5. Low blood sugar: The malarial parasite per se and the most commonly used medicine (quinine) are both known to cause low blood sugar levels. This can result in coma and even death.

Once the diagnosis is confirmed, treatment usually consists of chloroquine, Mefloquine, quinine sulfate, or hydroxychloroquine. There are various drug-resistant forms of malaria, and they may require combination therapy.
Prevention assumes greater significance with travellers going for vaccines prior to visiting these areas. Even the local people should find ways to avoid breeding of mosquitoes, use mosquito repellents and nets to avoid the infection.

6109 people found this helpful

Know The Types Of Malaria!

MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MD - General Medicine
General Physician, Greater Noida
Know The Types Of Malaria!

Mosquitoes might be tiny creatures, but are responsible for some of the most dreadful diseases, one of them is malaria. Malaria is caused by a parasite that is transmitted through mosquito bites directly or from mother to unborn baby and through blood transfusions. Very widely spread in the Asian and African continents, people travelling here are very cautious of this disease. In areas that are notorious for mosquito infestations, the local people also take preventive measures to ensure mosquito breeding is prevented or at least minimised.

Spread of the disease: When a mosquito bites an infected person, it picks up the parasite from the person and when it next bites another person, the infection is also transmitted. From there, the parasite travels to the liver and into the bloodstream before reaching another individual. While all people are prone to getting the infection, elderly people, children, pregnant women, and immunocompromised people are at greater risk. Also, new travellers are at greater risk than local people, who are to some extent immune to mosquito bites.

Symptoms: The disease is characterised by moderate to severe shaking chills which are more common in the evening, high fever, profuse sweating, headache, vomiting, and diarrhoea. Quite often, there is about a 4-week gap between the time of the mosquito bite and the onset of symptoms. However, in many people, the disease could lie dormant and symptoms manifest when the immunity is severely lowered.
With the gradual progression of the disease, more severe symptoms could evolve as below, and that is when malaria becomes life-threatening.

  1. Cerebral malaria: Once the parasites enter the bloodstream, they can block the minor blood vessels in the brain leading to cerebral oedema and even brain damage. It could eventually result in coma.
  2. Anaemia: There is large-scale destruction of red blood cells, leading to severe anaemia and weakness and fatigue
  3. Breathing problems: Similarly, accumulation of fluid in the lung spaces can lead to pulmonary oedema which causes difficulty breathing and lung failure.
  4. Organ failure: Blood flow blockage to other vital organs like kidneys, liver, and spleen are also possible. The spleen may rupture leading to severe haemorrhage.
  5. Low blood sugar: The malarial parasite per se and the most commonly used medicine (quinine) are both known to cause low blood sugar levels. This can result in coma and even death.

Once the diagnosis is confirmed, treatment usually consists of chloroquine, Mefloquine, quinine sulfate, or hydroxychloroquine. There are various drug-resistant forms of malaria, and they may require combination therapy.

Prevention assumes greater significance with travellers going for vaccines prior to visiting these areas. Even the local people should find ways to avoid breeding of mosquitoes, use mosquito repellents and nets to avoid the infection.

6781 people found this helpful

Malaria - 10 Signs You Must Know!

Dr.Deepak Agrawal 91% (292ratings)
MBBS, MD - General Medicine, FCCS,USA, DIPLOMA IN HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT, POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION
Sexologist, Jaipur
Malaria - 10 Signs You Must Know!

Malaria refers to the disease transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito. The primary agent of transmission of this disease is the ‘Anopheles’ mosquito. This particular breed of mosquito carries the species causing organism, a parasitic protozoan, known as ‘Plasmodium species’.

The parasite, upon entering the bloodstream, attaches itself to the liver. It is at this location that the parasite matures and after a few days begins to infect the red blood cells that are secreted by the liver. The red blood cells that are infected tend to explode in about forty eight to seventy two hours due to the rapid multiplication of parasites inside them. The subtropical regions and regions that exist in a broad band around the equator are known to be the hotspots of species.

Symptoms

Upon being infected, the sign and symptoms of malaria show up within 10 days to 4 weeks. Some of the general symptoms include:

  1. Nausea

  2. High fever

  3. Headache

  4. Extreme sweating

  5. Moderate to severe chills

  6. Vomiting

  7. Anaemia

  8. Diarrhoea

  9. Pain in muscles

  10. Blood in stools

In some cases, malaria can lead to further severe complications, such as:

  1. Kidney, spleen or liver failure

  2. Cerebral malaria (swollen blood vessels in the brain)

  3. Low blood sugar

  4. Pulmonary oedema (fluid accumulation in the lungs which causes breathing difficulties)

The medications administered for malaria depend on factors such as:

  1. Severity of the infection

  2. Physical conditions such as allergies, pregnancy and other health problems,

  3. Age

Some of the most common medicines used to address malaria include:

  1. Chloroquine

  2. Malarone

  3. Doxycycline

  4. Quinine sulphate

  5. Mefloquine

  6. Hydroxychloroquine

  7. A mix of Proguanil and Atovaquone 

    If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a general physician.

3302 people found this helpful