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Atorica Crc 40Mg Tablet Tips

Dr.Ramakanth Reddy 92% (207ratings)
MBBS, Diploma In Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Newborns, with their soft and sensitive skin, are highly prone to a wide variety of rashes. The rashes often look alarming and are a major source of anxiety for parents. The good news is that the vast majority of rashes are self-limiting in nature and settle spontaneously on their own. However, some forms of rashes need medical attention.
1 person found this helpful

The Increasing Problem Of Liver Tumours In India!

Aster Cmi Hospital 91% (140ratings)
MBBS & M.S General Surgery
General Surgeon, Bangalore
The Increasing Problem Of Liver Tumours In India!

The liver is the engine of the human body. It is basically composed of 2 types of cells (a cell is the basic building block of the human body) – hepatocytes (liver cells) and cholangiocytes (bile duct cells). It also has other supporting tissue and their respective cells. The hepatocytes are by far the most numerous cell type, not surprisingly tumours (otherwise called mass or lump. “Tumor” means lump in Latin), of this cell form the majority of abnormal growths in the liver. Abnormal growths can be benign (that is, they do not grow rapidly, spread to other parts of the organ or to other parts of the body) or malignant (grow rapidly, spread to other parts of the organ and to other parts of the body, i.e. cancer). These abnormal growths from liver cells are Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), Adenomas (the benign variety) and hepatocellular cancer (otherwise called Hepatoma/HCC, the cancerous type). What we need to recognize is that certain adenomas can turn into HCC, over a period of time. The other type of growths in the liver are those that have originated elsewhere in the body and spread to the liver, for example a growth of the breast spreading to the liver. These are in fact the commonest tumours of the liver. I will discuss these at a later date.

Benign growths of the liver

Common benign growths are Haemangiomas, FNH and Adenoma. Most of these are identified when a scan is performed as investigation for some other problem. Accurate diagnosis of the nature of these lumps is important to determine the type of treatment needed. This can be ascertained by a carefully selected scan like an Ultrasound, CT scan or an MRI. The technology of these scans is continuing to evolve and get better year on year. There are different types of Ultrasound, CT and MRI scans with different applications, based on whether contrast is used or not, the different phases of scanning, the type of MRI scanning sequence etc. Therefore, these scans although commonly available and used very frequently, need to be performed under the supervision of a team involving Liver doctors and radiologist who is well versed in the diagnosis of liver lumps, for accurate diagnosis without the need for unnecessary tests (Box 1).

Haemangiomas are by far the commonest. It is estimated that 5% of the adult population harbor this lump in their livers! They occur in both sexes and at all ages but are commonest between 30 to 50 years in women. Most of them are small, less than 4-5 cms in diameter and are are identified on Ultrasound. MRI and its various applications is the scan of choice for accurate diagnosis. This is crucial as most of them do not need treatment.

Focal Nodular Hyperplasia (FNH) are the second most common liver lumps. They are usually single and small (less than 4 cms) and occur in women between 35 – 50 years of age. About 2.5-3% of population harbor this lump in their livers. Special MRI techniques using special contrast agents is diagnostic and the findings are quite distinct from haemangiomas. Again treatment is not recommended apart from selected circumstances. Assessment in a dedicated Liver team is recommended for accurate diagnosis and a proper management plan to be formulated.

Hepatic adenomas (Hepatocellular adenoma, HCA) are rare lumps and occur in 0.2 to 0.3% of the population, again occurring mostly in young women during their reproductive period. They are again solitary and most usually 3-4 ms in diameter.

There are a couple characteristics which make this lump different from the previous 2, there is a strong relation between hormones the development of HCA and some of these HCA can turn into the malignant Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, accurate characterization and diagnosis of these HCA is essential. Sometimes biopsy of the lump, molecular and genetic tests maybe necessary to determine if the HCA has a high chance of progressing to HCC. Imaging tests are generally adequate, contrast MRI Liver and its different techniques is accurate in diagnosing HCA and sub-typing it, however CT and contrast-enhanced Ultrasound is sometimes necessary along with MRI.

Generally, a HCA in a male is recommended for surgical resection. While in women, discontinuation of the OCP pill/ any other such hormone is recommended for a period of 6 months, if the HCA does not have any worrying features and size is less than 5 cms. IF HCA is larger than 5 cms and has features suggestive of a high risk for change to HCC, surgery is advised. Again these decisions have to be made as a part of a Multi-disciplinary team (Box 1)

Malignant growths beginning within the Liver

As mentioned earlier, usually malignant growths which are seen in the liver spread to it from elsewhere in the body. Hepatocellular cancer/Hepatoma (HCC) is the commonest malignant tumour beginning within the liver, as apposed to those that spread to the liver from elsewhere. It occurs between 40-70 years of age and occurs commonly in men. It is estimated that 17000 new patients develop this tumour every year in India. The vast majority (> 80%) of these develop in patients who have chronic liver disease (cirrhosis). Importantly the number of HCC cases is increasing year on year as cirrhosis due to fatty liver disease, Hepatitis B (3% of Indian population carry this virus, ie nearly 40 million individuals) and alcohol are continuing to increase in India. Nearly overall it is the 4th or 5th most common cause of cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. This is continuing to increase too. We do not have a national policy in India to screen and diagnose these lumps in the liver at an early stage. Most patients present at a late stage when effective treatment is not possible.

Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable disease, there are good drugs to treat it and decrease the risk of cirrhosis and HCC in HBV patients, therefore it is important to test for this virus infection. The fatty liver disease can cause chronic liver damage and HCC, regular exercise and consuming a balanced diet can reduce the risk of fatty liver disease.

The usual mode of detection of these growths is when a scan is done for some other reason. Occasionally patients can develop pain in the abdomen or jaundice which leads to an investigation. The treatment of HCC depends on the extent of tumour, the extent of the chronic liver disease (the stage of cirrhosis) and the overall condition of the patient. These patients are best seen, assessed and treated in a team (Box 1) which specializes in the treatment of Liver disease.

The best treatment for HCC is surgery. However, this is suitable only for certain carefully selected patients. This can take the form of liver resection (where a portion of the liver with tumour is removed) or liver transplantation (where the whole liver is removed and a donated liver (full or partial) is replaced into the patient. Indeed surgical has excellent survival rates; more than 75% of patients survive for more than 5 years after resection or transplantation making treatment for these cancers one of the most satisfactory.

Other treatments which can be combined with surgery in selected patients or can be combined with patients not suitable for surgery are different types of Interventional radiological therapy – chemotherapy or radiotherapy delivered through fine catheters introduced into the blood vessels of the liver (TACE: Transarterial chemotherapy, TARE: Transarterial radiotherapy) and or heat energy delivered to the tumour area by means of carefully placed needles/probes (RFA: radiofrequency ablation, MWA: microwave ablation).

HCC is unique cancer as its treatment should be tailored to the patient, the treatments are varied and range from catheter-based non-invasive treatment to major surgery and transplantation. This necessitates that HCC patients are best managed in a multidisciplinary team which is highly skilled in and specializes in the management of liver diseases.

Box 1: A liver tumour multidisciplinary team – Integrated Liver Care team

  • The team should be one with expertise in the management of benign liver lesions and should include a Hepatologist, a Hepatobiliary & Transplant surgeon, Diagnostic and Interventional radiologists, Medical oncologist and a Pathologist.

  • Each member of the team must hold specific and relevant training, expertise and experience relevant to the management of benign liver lesions.

  • The team should be one with the skills required not only to appropriately manage these patients but also to manage the rare but known complications of diagnostic or therapeutic interventions.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3298 people found this helpful

Liver Tumours - How Lethal Are They?

MBBS (Gold Medalist), MS- General Surgery (Gold Medalist), DNB - General Surgery (Gold Medalist), DNB - GI surgery, Fellow Minimal Access Surgeon, Fellowship in Hepato Biliary, Pancreatic Surgery & Liver Transplantation, MRCS
Gastroenterologist, Kolkata
Liver Tumours - How Lethal Are They?

The liver is the engine of the human body. It is basically composed of 2 types of cells (a cell is the basic building block of the human body) – hepatocytes (liver cells) and cholangiocytes (bile duct cells). It also has other supporting tissue and their respective cells. The hepatocytes are by far the most numerous cell type, not surprisingly tumours (otherwise called mass or lump. “Tumor” means lump in Latin), of this cell form the majority of abnormal growths in the liver. Abnormal growths can be benign (that is, they do not grow rapidly, spread to other parts of the organ or to other parts of the body) or malignant (grow rapidly, spread to other parts of the organ and to other parts of the body, i.e. cancer). These abnormal growths from liver cells are Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH), Adenomas (the benign variety) and hepatocellular cancer (otherwise called Hepatoma/HCC, the cancerous type). What we need to recognize is that certain adenomas can turn into HCC, over a period of time. The other type of growths in the liver are those that have originated elsewhere in the body and spread to the liver, for example a growth of the breast spreading to the liver. These are in fact the commonest tumours of the liver. I will discuss these at a later date.

Benign growths of the liver

Common benign growths are Haemangiomas, FNH and Adenoma. Most of these are identified when a scan is performed as investigation for some other problem. Accurate diagnosis of the nature of these lumps is important to determine the type of treatment needed. This can be ascertained by a carefully selected scan like an Ultrasound, CT scan or an MRI. The technology of these scans is continuing to evolve and get better year on year. There are different types of Ultrasound, CT and MRI scans with different applications, based on whether contrast is used or not, the different phases of scanning, the type of MRI scanning sequence etc. Therefore, these scans although commonly available and used very frequently, need to be performed under the supervision of a team involving Liver doctors and radiologist who is well versed in the diagnosis of liver lumps, for accurate diagnosis without the need for unnecessary tests (Box 1).

Haemangiomas are by far the commonest. It is estimated that 5% of the adult population harbor this lump in their livers! They occur in both sexes and at all ages but are commonest between 30 to 50 years in women. Most of them are small, less than 4-5 cms in diameter and are are identified on Ultrasound. MRI and its various applications is the scan of choice for accurate diagnosis. This is crucial as most of them do not need treatment.

Focal Nodular Hyperplasia (FNH) are the second most common liver lumps. They are usually single and small (less than 4 cms) and occur in women between 35 – 50 years of age. About 2.5-3% of population harbor this lump in their livers. Special MRI techniques using special contrast agents is diagnostic and the findings are quite distinct from haemangiomas. Again treatment is not recommended apart from selected circumstances. Assessment in a dedicated Liver team is recommended for accurate diagnosis and a proper management plan to be formulated.

Hepatic adenomas (Hepatocellular adenoma, HCA) are rare lumps and occur in 0.2 to 0.3% of the population, again occurring mostly in young women during their reproductive period. They are again solitary and most usually 3-4 ms in diameter.

There are a couple characteristics which make this lump different from the previous 2, there is a strong relation between hormones the development of HCA and some of these HCA can turn into the malignant Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, accurate characterization and diagnosis of these HCA is essential. Sometimes biopsy of the lump, molecular and genetic tests maybe necessary to determine if the HCA has a high chance of progressing to HCC. Imaging tests are generally adequate, contrast MRI Liver and its different techniques is accurate in diagnosing HCA and sub-typing it, however CT and contrast-enhanced Ultrasound is sometimes necessary along with MRI.

Generally, a HCA in a male is recommended for surgical resection. While in women, discontinuation of the OCP pill/ any other such hormone is recommended for a period of 6 months, if the HCA does not have any worrying features and size is less than 5 cms. IF HCA is larger than 5 cms and has features suggestive of a high risk for change to HCC, surgery is advised. Again these decisions have to be made as a part of a Multi-disciplinary team (Box 1)

Malignant growths beginning within the Liver

As mentioned earlier, usually malignant growths which are seen in the liver spread to it from elsewhere in the body. Hepatocellular cancer/Hepatoma (HCC) is the commonest malignant tumour beginning within the liver, as apposed to those that spread to the liver from elsewhere. It occurs between 40-70 years of age and occurs commonly in men. It is estimated that 17000 new patients develop this tumour every year in India. The vast majority (> 80%) of these develop in patients who have chronic liver disease (cirrhosis). Importantly the number of HCC cases is increasing year on year as cirrhosis due to fatty liver disease, Hepatitis B (3% of Indian population carry this virus, ie nearly 40 million individuals) and alcohol are continuing to increase in India. Nearly overall it is the 4th or 5th most common cause of cancer and the second most common cause of cancer-related death. This is continuing to increase too. We do not have a national policy in India to screen and diagnose these lumps in the liver at an early stage. Most patients present at a late stage when effective treatment is not possible.

Hepatitis B is a vaccine-preventable disease, there are good drugs to treat it and decrease the risk of cirrhosis and HCC in HBV patients, therefore it is important to test for this virus infection. The fatty liver disease can cause chronic liver damage and HCC, regular exercise and consuming a balanced diet can reduce the risk of fatty liver disease.

The usual mode of detection of these growths is when a scan is done for some other reason. Occasionally patients can develop pain in the abdomen or jaundice which leads to an investigation. The treatment of HCC depends on the extent of tumour, the extent of the chronic liver disease (the stage of cirrhosis) and the overall condition of the patient. These patients are best seen, assessed and treated in a team (Box 1) which specializes in the treatment of Liver disease.

The best treatment for HCC is surgery. However, this is suitable only for certain carefully selected patients. This can take the form of liver resection (where a portion of the liver with tumour is removed) or liver transplantation (where the whole liver is removed and a donated liver (full or partial) is replaced into the patient. Indeed surgical has excellent survival rates; more than 75% of patients survive for more than 5 years after resection or transplantation making treatment for these cancers one of the most satisfactory.

Other treatments which can be combined with surgery in selected patients or can be combined with patients not suitable for surgery are different types of Interventional radiological therapy – chemotherapy or radiotherapy delivered through fine catheters introduced into the blood vessels of the liver (TACE: Transarterial chemotherapy, TARE: Transarterial radiotherapy) and or heat energy delivered to the tumour area by means of carefully placed needles/probes (RFA: radiofrequency ablation, MWA: microwave ablation).

HCC is unique cancer as its treatment should be tailored to the patient, the treatments are varied and range from catheter-based non-invasive treatment to major surgery and transplantation. This necessitates that HCC patients are best managed in a multidisciplinary team which is highly skilled in and specializes in the management of liver diseases.

Box 1: A liver tumour multidisciplinary team – Integrated Liver Care team

  • The team should be one with expertise in the management of benign liver lesions and should include a Hepatologist, a Hepatobiliary & Transplant surgeon, Diagnostic and Interventional radiologists, Medical oncologist and a Pathologist.

  • Each member of the team must hold specific and relevant training, expertise and experience relevant to the management of benign liver lesions.

  • The team should be one with the skills required not only to appropriately manage these patients but also to manage the rare but known complications of diagnostic or therapeutic interventions.

1750 people found this helpful

HIV is a virus, but AIDS is a medical condition!

Dr.Vinod Raina 95% (6486ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi

HIV infection can cause AIDS to develop. However, it is possible to contract HIV without developing AIDS. Without treatment, HIV can progress and, eventually, it will develop into AIDS in the vast majority of cases.

 

1 person found this helpful

Symptoms Of Heart Attack!

Dr.Saurabh Juneja 87% (259ratings)
MBBS, Master of Surgery - General Surgery, Magistrar Chirurgiae (Cardio-Thoracic Surgery)
Cardiologist, Faridabad
Symptoms Of Heart Attack!

Heart attack or myocardial infarction mostly occurs when the flow of blood to the heart is blocked due to one or more reasons. The most prominent reason could be high fat or cholesterol that results in plaque build up in the coronary artery. The restricted blood flow has the potential to damage or even destroy the heart muscle. Some of the symptoms that can be helpful when it comes to the identification of a heart attack are listed below.

1. Discomfort in the Chest - Your chest may feel tight and pressured when you are about to be hit by a heart attack. Pain or discomfort in the chest is usually central typically felt behind the sternum, the central bone of chest. It may not be pain, it may be only discomfort, it may only be in upper part of tummy, very commonly confused with a gas problem. It is often accompanied by a painful sensation in the chest or arms. If a chest pain lasts more than 15-20 min it can be assumed to be a heart attack. This aching sensation may even spread to your back, neck or jaw.

2. Feeling of inconvenience - Often before the heart attack, the person may have feelings of nausea, ingestion, abdominal pain or a heartburn.


3. Breathing problems - Another prominent symptom of heart attack is shortness of breath which is accompanied by cold sweat and fatigue.

Emergency Measure:

If you think you are getting a heart attack, you should immediately take one tablet of Aspirin (preferably chew aspirin if possible), 4 tablets of a drug called Clopidogrel, and one tablet of Atorvastatin 80 mg and rush to the nearest possible medical facility as time is very important in the treatment of an acute heart attack. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

3099 people found this helpful

How to Know If You are Getting a Heart Attack?

Sr. Fellowship in Electrophysiology & Pacing, M.R.C.P.(U.K.), DM - Cardiology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS
Cardiologist, Delhi
How to Know If You are Getting a Heart Attack?

Heart attack or myocardial infarction mostly occurs when the flow of blood to the heart is blocked due to one or more reasons. The most prominent reason could be high fat or cholesterol that results in plaque build up in the coronary artery. The restricted blood flow has the potential to damage or even destroy the heart muscle. Some of the symptoms that can be helpful when it comes to the identification of a heart attack are listed below.

1. Discomfort in the Chest - Your chest may feel tight and pressured when you are about to be hit by a heart attack. Pain or discomfort in the chest is usually central typically felt behind the sternum, the central bone of chest. It may not be pain, it may be only discomfort, it may only be in upper part of tummy, very commonly confused with a gas problem. It is often accompanied by a painful sensation in the chest or arms. If a chest pain lasts more than 15-20 min it can be assumed to be a heart attack. This aching sensation may even spread to your back, neck or jaw.


2. Feeling of inconvenience - Often before the heart attack, the person may have feelings of nausea, ingestion, abdominal pain or a heartburn.

3. Breathing problems - Another prominent symptom of heart attack is shortness of breath which is accompanied by cold sweat and fatigue.

Emergency Measure:

If you think you are getting a heart attack, you should immediately take one tablet of Aspirin, 4 tablets of a drug called Clopidogrel, and one tablet of Atorvastatin 80 mg and rush to the nearest possible medical facility as time is very important in the treatment of an acute heart attack.

'Consult'.

Related Tip: Heart Attack - Is the Damage Reversible?

3901 people found this helpful

Can Breathing Problems Be A Symptom Of Heart Attack?

Dr.Anil Dhall 86% (17ratings)
MBBS, MD - Medicine, DM - Cardiology
Cardiologist, Delhi
Can Breathing Problems Be A Symptom Of Heart Attack?

Heart attack or myocardial infarction mostly occurs when the flow of blood to the heart is blocked due to one or more reasons. The most prominent reason could be high fat or cholesterol that results in plaque build up in the coronary artery. The restricted blood flow has the potential to damage or even destroy the heart muscle. Some of the symptoms that can be helpful when it comes to the identification of a heart attack are listed below.

1. Discomfort in the Chest - Your chest may feel tight and pressured when you are about to be hit by a heart attack. Pain or discomfort in the chest is usually central typically felt behind the sternum, the central bone of chest. It may not be pain, it may be only discomfort, it may only be in upper part of tummy, very commonly confused with a gas problem. It is often accompanied by a painful sensation in the chest or arms. If a chest pain lasts more than 15-20 min it can be assumed to be a heart attack. This aching sensation may even spread to your back, neck or jaw.


2. Feeling of inconvenience - Often before the heart attack, the person may have feelings of nausea, ingestion, abdominal pain or a heartburn.

3. Breathing problems - Another prominent symptom of heart attack is shortness of breath which is accompanied by cold sweat and fatigue.

Emergency Measure:

If you think you are getting a heart attack, you should immediately take one tablet of Aspirin, 4 tablets of a drug called Clopidogrel, and one tablet of Atorvastatin 80 mg and rush to the nearest possible medical facility as time is very important in the treatment of an acute heart attack.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3928 people found this helpful

Tips for Choosing a Toothbrush

Dr.Vaishali Katke 91% (312ratings)
MDS
Dentist, Mumbai
Tips for Choosing a Toothbrush
Size: the best toothbrush head for you should allow you easy access to all surfaces of your teeth. For most adults, a toothbrush head a half-inch wide and one-inch tall will be the easiest to use and the most effective.

Bristle variety. You will be able to select a toothbrush with soft, medium, or hard nylon bristles. For the vast majority of people, a soft-bristled toothbrush will be the most comfortable and safest choice. Depending on how vigorously you brush your teeth and the strength of your teeth, medium- and hard-bristled brushes could actually damage the gums, root surface, and protective tooth enamel.

404 people found this helpful

Dr.Sajeev Kumar 92% (39992ratings)
C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician, Alappuzha
Fatty Liver
It is also called nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in adults.
It is an ongoing silent epidemic in India.
Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) refers to the presence of hepatic steatosis when there are no other causes for secondary hepatic fat accumulation such as heavy alcohol consumption.
NAFLD may progress to cirrhosis and is likely an important cause of cryptogenic cirrhosis
NAFLD is subdivided into nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).
In NAFLD, hepatic steatosis is present without evidence of inflammation, whereas in NASH, hepatic steatosis is associated with hepatic inflammation that histologically is indistinguishable from alcoholic steatohepatitis
Risk factors for cirrhosis are, older age, diabetes, SGOT SGPT >2 times, BMI >28, higher visceral adiposity index, which takes into account waist circumference, BMI, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein level, less coffee consumption, heavy alcohol intake
As little as two drinks per day in those who are overweight (and one drink per day in those who are obese) is associated in hepatic injury.
Liver cancer is associated with cirrhosis due to NAFLD.
Heart disease is the most common cause of death among patients with NAFLD.
Weight loss for patients who are overweight or obese is recommended.
Goal for many patients is to lose 0.5 to 1 kg/week (1 to 2 lb/week).
Vaccination for Hepatitis A and B, pneumococcal vaccination and standard immunizations (e.G, influenza, diphtheria, tetanus boosters) are recommended for the population in general.
Risk factors for cardiovascular disease should be managed.
Vitamin E at a dose of 400 IU/day may be suggested for those patients with advanced fibrosis on biopsy who do not have diabetes or coronary artery disease.
Avoid all alcohol consumption.
Heavy alcohol use is associated with disease progression among patients with NAFLD.
Thiazolidinediones can improve histologic parameters in patients with NASH, metformin does not.
UDCA has anti-inflammatory effects in the liver
Atorvastatin has protective effect on SGOT, SGPT levels in patients with NAFLD.
Pentoxifylline inhibits production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and may be effective in NASH.
Omega-3 fatty acids may benefit NAFLD or NASH.
If serum ferritin >1.5 times the upper limit of normal: Progressive liver disease:
If SGOT:SGPT > twice the upper limit of normal, then refer
11 people found this helpful

How To Reduce Cholesterol?

M.Sc - Dietetics & Food Service Management, Post graduate diploma public health Nutrition , Certified in EFT and TFT, Lactation consultant, certified in energy healing, Certified in plant based diet, Certified NLP Practioner
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Lucknow
How To Reduce Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is an oil-based substance that does not mix with blood and is found in every cell of the body.LDL (low density lipoprotein) is the bad cholesterol and HLD (high density lipoprotein) is the good cholesterol. Cholesterol, at normal levels is good for us.But, if it gets too high then it can prove to be dangerous for us. Here’s a guide on how to reduce cholesterol and cholesterol diet, lowering high cholesterol, cholesterol medicine.

Cholesterol diet:Diet can help you to lower your cholesterol levels by 10 to 20 per cent.The best dietician in India says that the best cholesterol diet and for lowering high cholesterol you should include the following ten cholesterol reducing foods:

Foods rich in fibre, soya, nuts, healthy oils, oats, red wine, salmon, fenugreek, garlic, beans.

These are cholesterol lowering foods. And, suggested by the best dietician in India to lower high cholesterol naturally. For reducing cholesterol, you must add these foods to your daily diet.

Cholesterol Medicines: Various medicines are also used to lower high cholesterol. If your cholesterol is too high, then these are the medicines that are generally prescribed by doctors.The cholesterol medicines are:

Niacin: Niacin (Niaspan, Nicoar) is a B-vitamin. It is prescribed by doctors to lower bad cholesterol (LHL) and raise good cholesterol (HDL)

Statins (Atorvastatin, Fluvastatin, Lovastatin, Pitavastatin, Pravastatin, Rosuvastatin, and Simvastatin) Statins can lessen the chance of cardiac events. These are also prescribed by doctors to lower your bad cholesterol and raise your good cholesterol.

Exercise: The best dietician in India says that exercise is very helpful to lower your cholesterol. Exercise at least for 3 hours a week to raise your HDL. This is one of the very important parts for lowering high cholesterol.

Other tips to lower cholesterol: Here are other tips that you can follow for lowering high cholesterol. Apart from the above tips on cholesterol diet and cholesterol medicines, the best dietician in India says that you should:

  • Maintain healthy weight.
  • Avoid smoking.
  • Limit intake of foods containing saturated fats, trans fats, and dietary cholesterol

Follow the above tips and cholesterol diet for lowering your cholesterol naturally.

 

105 people found this helpful