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Dr. Kasish

Advanced Infertility

Audiologist, delhi

7 Years Experience
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Dr. Kasish Advanced Infertility Audiologist, delhi
7 Years Experience
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Personal Statement

Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; a......more
Hello and thank you for visiting my Lybrate profile! I want to let you know that here at my office my staff and I will do our best to make you comfortable. I strongly believe in ethics; as a health provider being ethical is not just a remembered value, but a strongly observed one.
More about Dr. Kasish
Dr. Kasish is a renowned Audiologist in Punjabi Bagh, Delhi. He has been a practicing Audiologist for 7 years. He has done Advanced Infertility . He is currently associated with shipra in Punjabi Bagh, Delhi. Don’t wait in a queue, book an instant appointment online with Dr. Kasish on Lybrate.com.

Lybrate.com has a number of highly qualified Audiologists in India. You will find Audiologists with more than 37 years of experience on Lybrate.com. You can find Audiologists online in Delhi and from across India. View the profile of medical specialists and their reviews from other patients to make an informed decision.

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Education
Advanced Infertility - A J Institute of Medical Sciences & Research Centre, Mangalore - 2011
Languages spoken
English
Hindi

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My kid is of 8 yrs old we had bera test and found 100% loss of hearing impairment in left ear. Please suggest what should we do further.

Pediatrician, Pune
Get a thorough evaluation by ent specialist, but why b era was done? why not an audiometry, please consult the ent specialist.
1 person found this helpful
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When I speak to people. They cannot hear my voice properly. They said me that you have bad sound. But in the past I was able to speak clearly but now what has happened with me. I have cough also. What should I do now?

Bachelor of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology (B.A.S.L.P)
Audiologist, Delhi
Go for voice evaluation by an audiologist, because there is something wrong with your vocal system i. E. Infection in larynx due to which you r suffering from dry cough and voice problem, which is unpleasant for listeners. So try to talk less, drink luke-warm water, avoid throat clearing, avoid tea, coffee, too much shouting etc. For voice conservation.
1 person found this helpful
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HEARING AIDS KNOWLEDGE BANK

Master of Hospital Administration, Bachelor of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology (B.A.S.L.P)
Speech Therapist, Gurgaon
HEARING AIDS  KNOWLEDGE  BANK

Perhaps you've thought about getting a hearing aid, but you're worried about how it will look or whether it will really help. It may help ease your concerns to know more about:
- The hearing aid options available to you
- What to look for when buying a hearing aid
- How to get used to it
- Hearing aids can't restore normal hearing. They can improve your hearing by amplifying soft sounds, helping you hear sounds that you've had trouble hearing.

How hearing aids work

Hearing aids use the same basic parts to carry sounds from the environment into your ear and make them louder. Most hearing aids are digital, and all are powered with a hearing aid battery.

Small microphones collect sounds from the environment. A computer chip with an amplifier converts the incoming sound into digital code. It analyzes and adjusts the sound based on your hearing loss, listening needs and the level of the sounds around you. The amplified signals are then converted back into sound waves and delivered to your ears through speakers.

Hearing aid styles

Hearing aids vary a great deal in price, size, special features and the way they're placed in your ear.

The following are common hearing aid styles, beginning with the smallest, least visible in the ear. Hearing aid designers keep making smaller hearing aids to meet the demand for a hearing aid that is not very noticeable. But the smaller aids may not have the power to give you the improved hearing you may expect.

Completely in the canal (CIC) or mini CIC

A completely-in-the-canal hearing aid is molded to fit inside your ear canal. It improves mild to moderate hearing loss in adults.

A completely-in-the-canal hearing aid:
- Is the smallest and least visible type
- Is less likely to pick up wind noise
- Uses very small batteries, which have shorter life and can be difficult to handle
- Doesn't contain extra features, such as volume control or a directional microphone
- Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker

In the canal

An in-the-canal (itc) hearing aid is custom molded and fits partly in the ear canal. This style can improve mild to moderate hearing loss in adults.

An in-the-canal hearing aid:
- Is less visible in the ear than larger styles
- Includes features that won't fit on completely-in-the-canal aids, but may be difficult to adjust due to its small size
- Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker

In the ear
An in-the-ear (ITE) hearing aid is custom-made in two styles — one that fills most of the bowl-shaped area of your outer ear (full shell) and one that fills only the lower part (half shell). Both are helpful for people with mild to severe hearing loss.

An in-the-ear hearing aid:
- Includes features that don't fit on smaller style hearing aids, such as a volume control
- May be easier to handle
- Uses a larger battery for longer battery life
- Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker
- May pick up more wind noise than smaller devices
- Is more visible in the ear than smaller devices

Behind the ear
A behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid hooks over the top of your ear and rests behind the ear. A tube connects the hearing aid to a custom earpiece called an earmold that fits in your ear canal. This type is appropriate for people of all ages and those with almost any type of hearing loss.

A behind-the-ear hearing aid:
- Traditionally has been the largest type of hearing aid, though some newer mini designs are streamlined and barely visible
- Is capable of more amplification than are other styles
- May pick up more wind noise than other styles

Receiver in canal or receiver in the ear
The receiver-in-canal (RIC) and receiver-in-the-ear (RITE) styles are similar to a behind-the-ear hearing aid with the speaker or receiver in the canal or in the ear. A tiny wire, rather than tubing, connects the pieces.

A receiver-in-canal hearing aid:
- Has a less visible behind-the-ear portion
- Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker

Open fit
An open-fit hearing aid is a variation of the behind-the-ear hearing aid with a thin tube. This style keeps the ear canal very open, allowing for low-frequency sounds to enter the ear naturally and for high-frequency sounds to be amplified through the hearing aid. This makes the style a good choice for people with mild to moderate hearing loss.

An open-fit hearing aid:
- Is less visible
- Doesn't plug the ear like the small in-the-canal hearing aids do, making your own voice sound better to you
- May be more difficult to handle and adjust due to small parts.

My mother feel Vibrating sounds in her Ears. And she can't listen properly. Is there any medicine or we have to buy a machine for listening properly.

Bachelor of Audiology & Speech Language Pathology (B.A.S.L.P)
Audiologist, Hyderabad
Hi, the vibrating is called one type of tinnitus. It is one of the symptom of hearing nerve weakness. See an audiologist to know her nerve condition through audiometry test and they can suggest you solution.
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MD - Medicine
Endocrinologist, Ahmedabad
Wear layers of clothes to protect you from cold breezes. Wear headgears also while going out.

Your Headphones Can Turn You Deaf!!

MS - ENT, MBBS
ENT Specialist, Delhi
Your Headphones Can Turn You Deaf!!

Did you know your earphones are making you deaf? Here's how.

Fact: Roughly 1.1 billion people worldwide within the age group of 12-35 have been found to be at an increased risk of developing hearing problems.

Listening to loud music on handheld devices using earphones has become a common trend among youngsters these days. You might find it very relaxing to plug in your earphones and escape into your own world of music, but you need to know that this can cause serious damage to your ears. The worst part: you won't realise your ears are being damaged until it's too late.

So, exactly how is loud music damaging your ears?

Continuous exposure to loud music from earphones or other sources results in a medical condition known as Noise-Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL), which can be associated with irreversible damage to the ears resulting in deafness.

When you hear loud music for a considerable amount of time every day it affects your hair cells (nerve cells responsible for sending sound signals to the brain) negatively, so that their ability to respond to sound decreases. If this keeps on happening for many months, eventually the hair cells are damaged beyond repair. These cells cannot be regenerated, making you permanently deaf.

How loud is too loud?

If your ears are exposed to sounds at 95, 100, 105, 110 and 115 dB (decibel, the unit used for measuring sound) for 4 hours, 2 hours, 1 hour, 30 minutes and 15 minutes each day respectively, your ears are at risk of getting severely damaged. Also, playing music at 120 dB or above can damage your ears instantly. You can have a realistic idea about the relation between decibels and sounds you commonly hear by referring to this list:

  1. 30 dB: soft whisper
  2. 75 dB: busy traffic
  3. 90 dB: noise of a motorcycle at 25 feet
  4. 100 dB: noise of a farm tractor
  5. 140 dB: jet plane taking off

Moreover, if you experience the following symptoms regularly, there's a high chance that you need to get your ears treated soon:

  1. A ringing sound in your ears when you are at a quiet place, which vanishes after a few minutes
  2. You need to raise the volume of TV or music to the fullest to hear it properly
  3. You have difficulty in hearing people talking at a distance of just 3 feet

Tips For Safer Listening

  1. Use earplugs: The louder the noise and the longer you're exposed to it, the greater the chance of damaging your hearing. Protect your ears with ear protectors – earplugs or earmuffs – and get away from the noise as quickly or as often as you can. 
  2. Turn down the music: Don't listen to your personal music player at very high volumes and never to drown out background noise. If the music is uncomfortable for you to listen to, or you can’t hear external sounds when you’ve got your headphones on, then it's too loud. It's also too loud if the person next to you can hear the music from your headphones.
  3. Use the 60:60 rule: To enjoy music from your MP3 player safely, listen to your music at 60% of the maximum volume for no more than 60 minutes a day. 
  4. Wear headphones: When listening to your personal music player, choose noise-cancelling headphones, or go retro with older muff-type headphones. Ear-bud style headphones and in-the-ear headphones are less effective at drowning out background noise. 
  5. Turn down the dial: Turn down the volume on your TV, radio or hi-fi a notch. Even a small reduction in volume can make a big difference to the risk of damage to your hearing. 
  6. Use earplugs when you’re listening to live music: They can reduce average sound levels by between 15 and 35 decibels. They’re widely available at many live music venues and shouldn’t spoil your enjoyment of the music.
  7. Don't put up with work noise: If you’re experiencing noise at work, talk to your human resources (HR) department or your manager and ask for advice on reducing the noise and getting hearing protection.
  8. Wear ear protectors: Wear ear protectors (earplugs or earmuffs) if you are using noisy equipment such as power drills, saws, sanders or lawn mowers.
  9. Be careful in the car: Listening to music in a confined space increases the risk of hearing damage. Don’t listen to music too loud for too long.
  10. Have a hearing detox: Give your ears time to recover after they’ve been exposed to loud noise. According to Action on Hearing Loss, you need at least 16 hours of rest for your ears to recover after spending around two hours in 100dB sound, for example in a club. Reducing this recovery time increases the risk of permanent deafness. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an ENT specialist.
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My hearing loss is 17db in left or 18db in right ear I use hearing aid and it gives me good feedback in collage and in conversation with friends sir I wants to know the use of hearing aid cause any sideffact on me or not.

MD Pediatrics
Pediatrician, Faridabad
My hearing loss is 17db in left or 18db in right ear I use hearing aid and it gives me good feedback in collage and i...
Hearing aida are there to help you hearinf better when your natural hearing is impaired die to any reason. It is very safe to use and have no side effects.
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I am suffering from hearing lose from 2008, I Had lot of medicine, But didn't work.

MS - ENT(Gold Medalist), MBBS
ENT Specialist, Delhi
Hearing loss can be due to many reasons so get your self examined by an ENT specialist to find out the cause and the same can be treated.
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