Get help from best doctors, anonymously
Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}

Overview

Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet

Manufacturer: Cadila Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Medicine composition: Isoniazid
Prescription vs.OTC: Prescription by Doctor required

Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet is an antibacterial drug which kills tuberculosis causing organisms. It is therefore used for the treatment and prevention of tuberculosis. It is supposed to be used with other medicines till it increase its effectiveness.

Avoid using this medicine if you are allergic to it, if you have any liver disorders or if you have had hepatitis from any medicine. Tell your doctor if you have diabetes, a history of alcohol or other substance abuse, kidney problems, nerve problems, unsanitary injectable drug habits, HIV, a history of liver problems or if you are older than 35 years old, you have recently given birth, or you have previously taken isoniazid.

Common side effects include increased blood levels of liver enzymes and numbness in the hands and feet. Serious side effects may include liver inflammation. Ask your doctor if use during pregnancy is safe for the baby. Its use during breastfeeding is likely to be okay.

Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet is administered into the body by mouth or by intramuscular or intravenous injections by a healthcare professional. This medicine should be taken 1 or 2 hours before meals. The dosage is based on your medical condition, age and how you respond to the first dose of the medicine.

tuberculosis (tb)
In addition to its intended effect, Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet may cause some unwanted effects too. In such cases, you must seek medical attention immediately. This is not an exhaustive list of side effects. Please inform your doctor if you experience any adverse reaction to the medication.
Peripheral neuropathy (tingling and numbness of feet and hand)
Increased liver enzymes
Hepatitis (viral infection of liver)
Is It safe with alcohol?
Isoniazid 300mg tablet may cause symptoms such as flushing, increased heartbeat, nausea, thirst, chest pain and low blood pressure with alcohol (Disulfiram reactions).
Are there any pregnancy warnings?
Isoniazid 300mg tablet may be unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Animal studies have shown adverse effects on the foetus, however, there are limited human studies. The benefits from use in pregnant women may be acceptable despite the risk. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any breast-feeding warnings?
Isoniazid 300mg tablet is probably safe to use during breastfeeding. Please consult your doctor.
Is it safe to drive while on this medicine?
Caution is advised when driving or operating machinery.
Does this affect kidney function?
There is no interaction between renal impairment and consuming this drug. So dose alteration is not needed.
Does this affect liver function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Below is the list of medicines, which have the same composition, strength and form as Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet, and hence can be used as its substitute.
Sunij Pharma Pvt Ltd
Macleods Pharmaceuticals Pvt Ltd
Are there any missed dose instructions?
If you miss a dose of Isoniazid, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular schedule. Do not double the dose.
Whenever you take more than one medicine, or mix it with certain foods or beverages, you're at risk of a drug interaction.
Interaction with Medicine
Mezolam 7.5Mg Injection
Medzol 1Mg Injection
ANZILUM 0.5MG TABLET
Anxil 25Mg Tablet
What are you using Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet for?
tuberculosis (tb)
Other
How much was the improvement?
Excellent
Average
Poor
How long did it take before seeing improvement?
Within 2 hours
More than 2 days
Within a day
How frequently did you take this medicine?
Once a day
Not taking on daily level
How did you take this medicine?
Empty stomach
With Food
With or without food
What were the side effects of this medicine?
Other
Peripheral neuropathy
Disclaimer: The information produced here is best of our knowledge and experience and we have tried our best to make it as accurate and up-to-date as possible, but we would like to request that it should not be treated as a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Lybrate is a medium to provide our audience with the common information on medicines and does not guarantee its accuracy or exhaustiveness. Even if there is no mention of a warning for any drug or combination, it never means that we are claiming that the drug or combination is safe for consumption without any proper consultation with an expert.

Lybrate does not take responsibility for any aspect of medicines or treatments. If you have any doubts about your medication, we strongly recommend you to see a doctor immediately.

Popular Questions & Answers

Hi I'm 24 year old TB patient (lymph node tb) .I was taking akt4. My liver reacted to pyrazinamide so my doctor stopped it after taking it for 2 -3 days. So My doctor suggested 9 months isoniazid and rifampicin .Is it ok?

MD - Respiratory Medicine
Pulmonologist, Allahabad
No. Kindly wait for few days. And start again. Isoniazid Nd rifampin regime is outdated. At present isoniazid Nd rifampin and ethambutol is considered. Nd infact pyrazinamide has less liver toxicity as compared to rifampin.

I have completed my 6 month course of tb and was feeling well. But now again I have got tb again. What to do now. I am taking streptomycin injection daily. And other 4 drugs. Isoniazid rifampicin combutol pyrazinamide. How long I have to take this drugs now. Is it correct treatment.

MBBS (Hons), MD DTCD CCMTD(Thyroid) , NMCH PATNA, PGD IN ENOCRINOLOGY & DIABETES
General Physician, Patna
Firstly you should go for proper investigation to rule out MDR TB. At least CB NAAT should be done.
5 people found this helpful

Hi Sir. Im undergoing treatment for lymph node TB. I missed my morning dose of Isoniazid (300) few days ago. Will it have any effect?

MBBS, MD - Pulmonary Medicine
Pulmonologist, Mohali
Usually missing a single dose does not affect the course of the disease. But if you miss the dose in the morning take it in the day whenever you remember.

From one and half year (Since Aug-16) I'm taking TB medicine. 1.mycobutol 750 2.pyrazinamide 750 3.Rifampin 600. Now I having join pain due to uric acid (aug-17 blood checkup uric acid is 7.2),so please suggest now what I do.

DNB
Pulmonologist, Mumbai
From one and half year (Since Aug-16) I'm taking TB medicine.
1.mycobutol 750
2.pyrazinamide 750
3.Rifampin 600.
Now ...
There is no reason for you to continue Pyrazinamide so long. And why is there no isoniazid in the prescribed drugs. The regimen you using for to cure tb is not correct. It should contain rifampicin, isoniazid, Pyrazinamide and ethambutol for 2-3 months and later the drugs should be continued without Pyrazinamide only for 9 months at the most in total. I don't understand the reason for 1.5 yrs of treatment. Even if it's bone tb the drugs should be for 1 year and without Pyrazinamide.

Popular Health Tips

Know About Tuberculosis

MD
General Physician, Secunderabad

Definition

Tb is a disease which in humans is usually caused by bacteria called mycobacterium tuberculosis (m. Tuberculosis). Tb is an abbreviation of the word tuberculosis and is how people often refer to the disease.

Bovine tb is a disease caused by similar bacteria called mycobacterium bovis (m. Bovis). Bovine tb mainly affects cattle but can also affect humans.

Just a few years ago it was believed that tb was an old disease, and that it was no longer a problem in humans. But now because of such issues as drug resistance and hiv, it has become a major problem again.

History

  • On march 24, 1882, Dr. Robert koch announced the discovery of mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (tb). During this time, tb killed one out of every seven people living in the united states and europe. Dr. Koch’s discovery was the most important step taken toward the control and elimination of this deadly disease.
  • In 1982, a century after Dr. Koch’s announcement, the first world tb day was sponsored by the world health organization (who) and the international union against tuberculosis and lung disease (iuatld). The event was intended to educate the public about the devastating health and economic consequences of tb, its effect on developing countries, and its continued tragic impact on global health.
  • Today, world tb day is commemorated across the globe with activities as diverse as the locations in which they are held. But more can be done to raise awareness about the effects of tb. Among infectious diseases, tb is now the leading killer of adults in the world, with 1.8 million tb-related deaths in 2015. In the united states, the overall number of tb cases increased over the previous year in 2015 after having declined yearly during 1993–2014.
  • Until tb is eliminated, world tb day won’t be a celebration. But it is a valuable opportunity to educate the public about the devastation tb can spread and how it can be stopped.

Epidemiology

Globally, more than 1 in 3 individuals is infected with tb. According to the who, there were 8.8 million incident cases of tb worldwide in 2010, with 1.1 million deaths from tb among hiv-negative persons and an additional 0.35 million deaths from hiv-associated tb. In 2009, almost 10 million children were orphaned as a result of parental deaths caused by tb.

Overall, the who noted the following:

  • The absolute number of tb cases has been falling since 2006 (rather than rising slowly, as indicated in previous global reports)
  • Tb incidence rates have been falling since 2002 (2 years earlier than previously suggested)
  • Estimates of the number of deaths from tb each year have been revised downwards
  • The 5 countries with the highest number of incident cases in 2010 were india, china, south africa, indonesia, and pakistan. India alone accounted for an estimated 26% of all tb cases worldwide, and china and india together accounted for 38%.

Types

1. Active tb

Active tb is an illness in which the tb bacteria are rapidly multiplying and invading different organs of the body. The typical symptoms of active tb variably include cough, phlegm, chest pain, weakness, weight loss, fever, chills and sweating at night. A person with active pulmonary tb disease may spread tb to others by airborne transmission of infectious particles coughed into the air.

If you are diagnosed with an active tb disease, be prepared to give a careful, detailed history of every person with whom you have had contact. Since the active form may be contagious, these people will need to be tested, as well.

Multi-drug treatment is employed to treat active tb disease. Depending on state or local public health regulations, you may be asked to take your antibiotics under the supervision of your physician or other healthcare professional. This program is called “directly observed therapy” and is designed to prevent abandonment or erratic treatment, which may result in “failure” with continued risk of transmission or acquired resistance of the bacteria to the medications, including the infamous multi-drug resistant tb (mdr-tb).

2. Miliary tb

Miliary tb is a rare form of active disease that occurs when tb bacteria find their way into the bloodstream. In this form, the bacteria quickly spread all over the body in tiny nodules and affect multiple organs at once. This form of tb can be rapidly fatal.

Types of tb

1. Cavitary tb

Cavitary tb involves the upper lobes of the lung. The bacteria cause progressive lung destruction by forming cavities, or enlarged air spaces. This type of tb occurs in reactivation disease. The upper lobes of the lung are affected because they are highly oxygenated (an environment in which m. Tuberculosis thrives). Cavitary tb can, rarely, occur soon after primary infection.

Symptoms include productive cough, night sweats, fever, weight loss, and weakness. There may be hemoptysis (coughing up blood). Patients with cavitary tb are highly contagious. Occasionally, disease spreads into the pleural space and causes tb empyema (pus in the pleural fluid).

2. Latent tb infection

Latent tb occurs when a person has the tb bacteria within their body, but the bacteria are present in very small numbers. They are kept under control by the body’s immune system and do not cause any symptoms.

People with latent tb do not feel sick and are not infectious. They cannot pass the bacteria on to other people. In addition they will usually have a normal chest x-ray and a negative sputum test. It is often only known that someone has latent tb because they have had a test, such as the tb skin test.

Risk factors

You are at risk of tb infection if you are around people with active tb disease who are coughing, which releases bacteria into the air. The risk of infection increases for intravenous drug users, healthcare workers, and people who live or work in a homeless shelter, migrant farm camp, prison or jail, or nursing home.

Most people who are infected with the bacteria that cause tb do not develop active disease. The following factors increase the risk that latent disease will develop into active disease:

  • Infection with hiv, the virus that causes aids and weakens the immune system
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Low body weight
  • Head or neck cancer, leukemia, or hodgkin’s disease
  • Some medical treatments, including corticosteroids or certain medications used for autoimmune or vasculitic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or lupus, which suppress the immune system.
  • Silicosis, a respiratory condition caused by inhaling silica dust.

Causes

The mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium causes tb. It is spread through the air when a person with tb (whose lungs are affected) coughs, sneezes, spits, laughs, or talks.

Causes of tuberculosis

  • Tb is contagious, but it is not easy to catch. The chances of catching tb from someone you live or work with are much higher than from a stranger. Most people with active tb who have received appropriate treatment for at least 2 weeks are no longer contagious.
  • Since antibiotics began to be used to fight tb, some strains have become resistant to drugs. Multidrug-resistant tb (mdr-tb) arises when an antibiotic fails to kill all of the bacteria, with the surviving bacteria developing resistance to that antibiotic and often others at the same time.
  • Mdr-tb is treatable and curable only with the use of very specific anti-tb drugs, which are often limited or not readily available. In 2012, around 450, 000 people developed mdr-tb.

Symptoms

Although tuberculosis (tb) is most frequently associated with symptoms involving the lungs—because the disease most often affects the lungs—it can affect any organ of the body. The disease can cause a variety of symptoms. If you have symptoms, your doctor will want to know when they began.

People with latent tb infection (an infection without active disease) have no symptoms.

The usual symptoms of tb include:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Night sweats
  • Cough
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Blood in the sputum (phlegm)
  • Loss of energy

The symptoms may be mild and may not seem particularly worrisome to the patient. In other people, the symptoms become chronic and severe.

Other symptoms of active tb disease depend on where in the body the bacteria are growing. If active tb disease is in the lungs (pulmonary tb), the symptoms may include a bad cough, pain in the chest, and coughing up blood. If active tb is outside the lungs (for example, the kidney, spine, brain, or lymph nodes), it is called extrapulmonary tb and has other symptoms, depending on which organs are affected. For example, tuberculosis in the spine may cause back pain or stiffness.

Diagnosis and test

  • During the physical exam, your doctor will check your lymph nodes for swelling and use a stethoscope to listen carefully to the sounds your lungs make while you breathe.
  • The most commonly used diagnostic tool for tuberculosis is a simple skin test, though blood tests are becoming more commonplace. A small amount of a substance called ppd tuberculin is injected just below the skin of your inside forearm. You should feel only a slight needle prick.
  • Within 48 to 72 hours, a health care professional will check your arm for swelling at the injection site. A hard, raised red bump means you’re likely to have tb infection. The size of the bump determines whether the test results are significant.
  • If your gp suspects you may have tb, they will send you for testing. If you do have tb, it’s best to know as soon as possible. Delaying treatment makes it more likely you may develop long-term health problems and could put people close to you at risk.

Types of tb test

There are a range of tests to show if you have tb, such as a sputum test, a culture test and x-rays.

Chest x-ray

A chest x-ray can show damage in your lungs, but you might need further tests to prove you have tb, such as sputum and culture tests or scans.

Testing sputum

A lab will use a microscope to look at any sputum (phlegm) that you cough up. If there are tb germs in your sputum, you have tuberculosis of the lungs or throat (pulmonary tb). This test also helps doctors to understand how infectious you may be.

Biopsy

If it is thought that you have tb, but not in your lungs or throat, the doctor may take a biopsy to test for tb. This is a small sample of tissue or fluid taken from the area where the tb is thought to be.

Culture test

This test uses your sputum or tissue sample to grow any tb bacteria that may be there. It tells doctors how infectious you are and also whether your tb is resistant to any antibiotics. This helps ensure they put you on a combination of drugs that will cure you. As tb culture grows slowly, it may take up to eight weeks to get some of the results.

Treatment and medications

Treatment for active tb

If you have this form of the disease, you’ll need to take a number of antibiotics for 6 to 9 months. These four medications are most commonly used to treat it:

Your doctor may order a test that shows which antibiotics will kill the tb strain. Based on the results, you’ll take three or four medications for 2 months. Afterward, you’ll take two medications for 4 to 7 months.

You’ll probably start to feel better after a few weeks of treatment. But only a doctor can tell you if you’re still contagious. If you’re not, you may be able to go back to your daily routine.

Treatment of latent tb

The treatment of latent tb is considered by many people to be an important part of tb prevention.

It is not recommended that everyone with latent tb infection (ltbi) should have tb treatment. Rather it is recommended that certain “target” groups should receive treatment. The main “target” groups considered by the world health organisation (who) to be most at risk from progressing from latent to active tb include people in low tb burden countries:

  • Who have had recent contact with an infectious patient;
  • With silicosis (there is more about tb & mining);
  • Infected with both tb and hiv;
  • Who have been or who are in prison;
  • Who are immigrants to a low burden country from a high burden country;
  • Who are homeless;
  • Who are an illicit drug user;

Who have certain clinical conditions, or conditions which compromise their immune system, such as people with diabetes, and people with chronic renal failure.

In high tb burden countries the populations that are most strongly recommended for the treatment of latent tb infection are people living with hiv, and children under five who are household contacts of pulmonary tb cases.

Treatment for miliary tb

  • Antibiotics
  • Corticosteroids
  • Sometimes surgery
  • Generally, treatment of miliary tuberculosis is similar to thetreatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.
  • Antibiotics are given usually given for 6 to 9 months, unless the meninges are affected. Then antibiotics are given for 9 to 12 months.
  • Corticosteroids may help if the pericardium or meninges are affected.
  • Tuberculosis bacteria can easily develop resistance to antibiotics, particularly when people do not take the drugs regularly or for as long as they are supposed to.
  • Surgery is needed for some complications of military tuberculosis.

Prevention

If you test positive for latent tb infection, your doctor may advise you to take medications to reduce your risk of developing active tuberculosis. The only type of tuberculosis that is contagious is the active variety, when it affects the lungs. So if you can prevent your latent tuberculosis from becoming active, you won’t transmit tuberculosis to anyone else.

Protect your family and friends

  • If you have active tb, keep your germs to yourself. It generally takes a few weeks of treatment with tb medications before you’re not contagious anymore. Follow these tips to help keep your friends and family from getting sick:
  • Stay home. Don’t go to work or school or sleep in a room with other people during the first few weeks of treatment for active tuberculosis.
  • Ventilate the room. Tuberculosis germs spread more easily in small closed spaces where air doesn’t move. If it’s not too cold outdoors, open the windows and use a fan to blow indoor air outside.
  • Cover your mouth. Use a tissue to cover your mouth anytime you laugh, sneeze or cough. Put the dirty tissue in a bag, seal it and throw it away.
  • Wear a mask. Wearing a surgical mask when you’re around other people during the first three weeks of treatment may help lessen the risk of transmission.
  • Finish your entire course of medication
  • This is the most important step you can take to protect yourself and others from tuberculosis. When you stop treatment early or skip doses, tb bacteria have a chance to develop mutations that allow them to survive the most potent tb drugs. The resulting drug-resistant strains are much more deadly and difficult to treat.

Vaccinations

In countries where tuberculosis is more common, infants often are vaccinated with bacillus calmette-guerin (bcg) vaccine because it can prevent severe tuberculosis in children. The bcg vaccine isn’t recommended for general use in the united states because it isn’t very effective in adults. Dozens of new tb vaccines are in various stages of development and testing.

5 people found this helpful

Tuberculosis(TB) - How To Treat It Effectively?

MBBS.DTCD
Pulmonologist, Hyderabad
Tuberculosis(TB) - How To Treat It Effectively?

Tuberculosis is a serious infectious disease that can affect the lungs. The bacteria spread through sneezes and coughs making it a communicable disease. This disease was rare and limited to the Western Countries until 1985. The emergence of HIV virus has made tuberculosis a global disease to reckon with. Although the rate of TB has come down since 1993, it remains a top concern for many countries. The biggest worry is the fact that TB bacteria can build resistance to many drugs. Therefore, it is very important that a TB patient takes a variety of medication suggested by the doctor at the right time.

Although your body is already in possession of the bacteria leading to tuberculosis, your immune system is able to prevent you from becoming sick. Doctors have made a distinction between latent and active tuberculosis (TB)--

In case of latent TB, the bacteria in the body in a passive state and it causes no symptoms, and therefore it is not contagious. But, in the case of active TB, you would become sick and may even spread the disease to others. It can take place in the first few weeks or even after several months of being infected with TB bacteria.

Types of Tuberculosis:
There are two types of tuberculosis- Latent and Active.

  1. Latent Tuberculosis is a condition where the bacteria stays in the system of a person but doesn’t show up any symptoms of TB. Although this type of TB is not contagious, it requires treatment so that TB can be controlled from spreading.
  2. Then there is active tuberculosis. It shows symptoms in the first few weeks and can spread to another person as well.

What are the symptoms of active TB?

  1. If you are coughing for over three weeks and sometimes even coughing up blood, it can be a sign of TB.
  2. Chest pain and pain while coughing and breathing along with fatigue, fever, chills and night sweat are the common symptoms of TB along with loss of appetite and unintentional weight loss.
  3. TB may even affect other organs of your body, including your brain, spine and kidneys.
  4. When TB takes place outside the lungs, then the signs of TB can vary as per the organs that are involved. For instance, TB in the spine can cause back pain and that in kidneys may cause blood in the urine.

What are the causes of TB?

  1. TB is stemmed from a bacteria which spreads from individual to individual via the microscopic droplets that are released into the air.
  2. This may happen when an affected person is left untreated and he speaks or sneezes or coughs or laughs. Though the disease is contagious, it is not easy to be affected by it.
  3. As a result, you are much more likely to get affected with active tuberculosis from a person you live with or come in regular contact with, rather than a stranger.
  4. It is important to note here that people who are affected with TB and going through proper medications for over two weeks are no more contagious.

Tuberculosis - How to effectively treat it?

With the treatment for tuberculosis, one should have patience as it may take time to cure a person completely of tuberculosis and the associated symptoms. Many factors are taken into consideration while determining the course of the treatment for tuberculosis, some of which include

  • Type of tuberculosis (Latent or Active).
  • Age of the patient.
  • The condition being drug resistant.
  • The general health of the patient (if there are any other health conditions that may interfere with the treatment).

In the case of Active TB and that too, a drug-resistant type, the use of multiple drugs (simultaneously) may be needed to produce the desired results. The drugs commonly used include Pyrazinamide, Rifampin, Ethambutol, and Isoniazid. In most cases, the doctors suggest the drugs be continued for at least six- nine months for positive results.

Some patients with Active TB (drug resistant) may also benefit from the use of fluoroquinolones (antibiotics) taken along with capreomycin, amikacin, or kanamycin (mostly given in the form of injections). Most patients are required to follow the medication for 20-30 months duration.

Unlike the Active TB, in the case of Latent TB, a combination of drugs and medications is not required. A single TB specific drug is enough to treat the condition.

Therefore, it is important to seek medical assistance and detect if you have any such health complications concerning TB.

3018 people found this helpful

All About Acne Vulgaris

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
All About Acne Vulgaris

Acne vulgaris is a common chronic skin disease involving blockage and/or inflammation of pilosebaceous units (hair follicles and their accompanying sebaceous gland). Acne can present as noninflammatory lesions, inflammatory lesions, or a mixture of both, affecting mostly the face but also the back and chest.

Acne vulgaris has a multifactorial pathogenesis, of which the key factor is genetics. Acne develops as a result of an interplay of the following four factors: (1) follicular epidermal hyperproliferation with subsequent plugging of the follicle, (2) excess sebum production, (3) the presence and activity of the commensal bacteria Propionibacterium acnes, and (4) inflammation.

Acne occurs through the interplay of 4 major factors:

  • Excess sebum production
  • Follicular plugging with sebum and keratinocytes
  • Colonization of follicles by Propionibacterium acnes (a normal human anaerobe)
  • Release of multiple inflammatory mediators

The most common trigger is

  • Puberty

During puberty, surges in androgen stimulate sebum production and hyperproliferation of keratinocytes.

Other triggers include

  • Hormonal changes that occur with pregnancy or the menstrual cycle
  • Occlusive cosmetics, cleansers, lotions, and clothing
  • High humidity and sweating
  • Associations between acne exacerbation and diet, inadequate face washing, masturbation, and sex are unfounded. Some studies suggest a possible association with milk products and high-glycemic diets. Acne may abate in summer months because of sunlight’s anti-inflammatory effects. Proposed associations between acne and hyperinsulinism require further investigation. Some drugs and chemicals (eg, corticosteroids, lithium, phenytoin, isoniazid) worsen acne or cause acneiform eruptions.
  • Acne results in a variety of lesions. The most common acne locations include the face, neck, chest, and back, where the most sebaceous glands are located. Along the jaw line is a common location in adults. "Blackheads" (open comedones) and "whiteheads" (closed comedones) are follicular plugs that are either sitting below the skin surface (whitehead) or oxidized from being exposed to the air (blackhead). Papules are small pink to reddish-brown bumps, pustules are pus-filled lesions, and nodules or cysts are deeper pus-filled lesions.
  • Mild acne consists of a few papules/pustules and/or comedones. Moderate acne has an increased number of lesions. Severe acne has numerous comedones, papules, pustules, and may have painful nodules.
  • Acne can result in permanent scars, which can appear to be depressions in the skin or hyperpigmentation, which is dark red or brown flat marks where the acne lesions were.

Treatment

7 people found this helpful

Extra - Pulmonary Tuberculosis And Its Treatment!

MD - Pulmonary, DTCD
Pulmonologist, Faridabad
Extra - Pulmonary Tuberculosis And Its Treatment!

Tuberculosis refers to an infectious disease associated with the lungs, which is mostly caused by bacteria. There are two types of tuberculosis, that are pulmonary tuberculosis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. There are various types under each type of tuberculosis. Here are some the possible treatments for both pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

What is pulmonary tuberculosis?
Pulmonary tuberculosis is a type of disease in which bacteria invade your lungs. It is possible that the bacteria in your lungs could kill you. However, fortunately if you have been taking the right medicines for your bacterial infection you can get cured immediately. The name of the bacteria which causes tuberculosis is known as the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, Mycobacterium tuberculosis can attack other parts of the body as well. When this happens, it is known as extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

What is extra-pulmonary tuberculosis?
Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is when tuberculosis affects in parts of the body other than the lungs. There are many parts of the body which tuberculosis can affect, including the lymph nodes, nervous system as well as the bone and joints. Luckily, it is easily curable.

Treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis
Firstly, it is worth noting that latent tuberculosis has no symptoms and there is no way you can pass it to another person either. However, it is still crucial that you take treatment for it. If you do not complete your treatment, then your tuberculosis will progress to a very dangerous form of tuberculosis. This is known as multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is sometimes abbreviated as MDR TB. There are plenty of medicines which people are recommended to cure tuberculosis. These include:

  1. Isoniazid
  2. Rifampin
  3. Ethambutol
  4. Pyrazinamide

Treatment for extrapulmonary tuberculosis
Extrapulmonary tuberculosis has pretty much the same symptoms as pulmonary tuberculosis. This is because extrapulmonary tuberculosis is the exact same disease which occurs to the patient, it is just that it affects a different body part. Therefore, the exact treatment recommended for pulmonary tuberculosis can be used to cure extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3993 people found this helpful

Pulmonary Tuberculosis And Its Treatment!

Diploma in Tuberculosis and Chest Diseases (DTCD), Board Certified in Pulmonary Medicine, FCCP - Pulmonary Medicine
Pulmonologist, Nagpur
Pulmonary Tuberculosis And Its Treatment!

Tuberculosis refers to an infectious disease associated with the lungs, which is mostly caused by bacteria. There are two types of tuberculosis, that are pulmonary tuberculosis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. There are various types under each type of tuberculosis. Here are some the possible treatments for both pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

What is pulmonary tuberculosis?
Pulmonary tuberculosis is a type of disease in which bacteria invade your lungs. It is possible that the bacteria in your lungs could kill you. However, fortunately if you have been taking the right medicines for your bacterial infection you can get cured immediately. The name of the bacteria which causes tuberculosis is known as the Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, Mycobacterium tuberculosis can attack other parts of the body as well. When this happens, it is known as extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

What is extra-pulmonary tuberculosis?
Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is when tuberculosis affects in parts of the body other than the lungs. There are many parts of the body which tuberculosis can affect, including the lymph nodes, nervous system as well as the bone and joints. Luckily, it is easily curable.

Treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis
Firstly, it is worth noting that latent tuberculosis has no symptoms and there is no way you can pass it to another person either. However, it is still crucial that you take treatment for it. If you do not complete your treatment, then your tuberculosis will progress to a very dangerous form of tuberculosis. This is known as multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is sometimes abbreviated as MDR TB. There are plenty of medicines which people are recommended to cure tuberculosis. These include:

  1. Isoniazid
  2. Rifampin
  3. Ethambutol
  4. Pyrazinamide

Treatment for extrapulmonary tuberculosis
Extrapulmonary tuberculosis has pretty much the same symptoms as pulmonary tuberculosis. This is because extrapulmonary tuberculosis is the exact same disease which occurs to the patient, it is just that it affects a different body part. Therefore, the exact treatment recommended for pulmonary tuberculosis can be used to cure extrapulmonary tuberculosis. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Pulmonologist.

2853 people found this helpful

Table of Content

About Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet
When is Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet prescribed?
What are the side effects of Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet?
Key highlights of Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet
What are the substitutes for Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet?
What are the dosage instructions?
What are the interactions for Isoniazid 300Mg Tablet?