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Overview

Acnex 20 MG Capsule

Acnex 20 MG Capsule

Manufacturer: Unichem Laboratories Ltd
Medicine composition: Isotretinoin
Prescription vs.OTC: Prescription by Doctor required

Acnex 20 MG Capsule belongs to a category of chemical compounds called retinoid. This medication helps in the treatment of cystic acne or nodular acne that has previously not responded to any other kinds of treatment. It lowers the production of facial oil and prevents hardening of the skin. If acne is not properly treated it can cause permanent scarring.

On using Acnex 20 MG Capsule you may experience the following side effects: drying of skin around the lips and mouth, bleeding from the nose, stomach upset, hair loss. Should these reactions continue or worsen with time notify your health care provider right away. However, it is advised that before taking Acnex 20 MG Capsule you should take preventive measures and consult your doctor if:

  • You are taking any prescriptive or over the counter drugs, vitamins, herbal or dietary supplements.
  • You are allergic to the ingredients contained within this drug or are allergic to any other medicines especially drugs containing vitamin A.
  • You are allergic to foods, particularly peanuts or soy.
  • You have a medical or family history of diabetes, liver disease, eating disorders, mental disorders or lowered bone density.
  • You are pregnant, are planning to become pregnant or are breastfeeding.
  • You have hearing problems, bowel problems or irregular periods.

Some medications may interact with Acnex 20 MG Capsule and have some adverse effects, in such cases care should be taken to have a discussion with your doctor. Take Acnex 20 MG Capsule as prescribed. Acnex 20 MG Capsule comes in a capsule form and needs to be swallowed down with a glass of water. You may have it with our without food. It needs to be taken twice daily for a minimum of four to five months. In case of a missed dose try to take it as soon as you recall it or skip it entirely. Do not by any means try to have a double dose. In case of drug overdose notify your doctor promptly. It may take a few weeks before results start to show.

Acne vulgaris
This medicine is used for the prevention and treatment of severe and painful nodular acne.
Allergy
This medicine is not recommended for use if you have a known history of allergy to tretinoin/isotretinoin/retinoids or any other component present in the dosage form.
Liver Disease
This medicine is not recommended for use if you have an impairment of liver function.
Hypervitaminosis A
This medicine is not recommended for use if you have more than normal levels of vitamin A in the body.
In addition to its intended effect, Acnex 20 MG Capsule may cause some unwanted effects too. In such cases, you must seek medical attention immediately. This is not an exhaustive list of side effects. Please inform your doctor if you experience any adverse reaction to the medication.
Bone and joint pain Major Rare
Bleeding from nose Major Rare
Scaling, burning, redness, and swelling of skin Moderate Less Common
Nausea and Vomiting Moderate Rare
Stomach Pain Moderate Rare
Diarrhea Moderate Rare
Pain and tenderness of eyes Moderate Rare
Itchy and dry skin Minor Less Common
Heart burn Minor Common
Rectal bleeding Moderate Rare
Difficult or painful urination Moderate Less Common
Increased thirst Minor Less Common
Increased heartbeat Moderate Rare
Ringing or buzzing in the ears Moderate Less Common
How long is the duration of effect?
The time duration for which this medicine remains effective is not clinically established.
What is the onset of action?
The effect of this medicine can be observed within 2-4 weeks of topical application.
Are there any pregnancy warnings?
Use of this medicine by women are pregnant or suspecting a pregnancy is not recommended. It is advised to take extra precautionary measures and avoid intended/unintended pregnancy while using this medicine.
Is it habit forming?
No habit forming tendencies were reported.
Are there any breast-feeding warnings?
Use of this medicine by women who are breastfeeding is not recommended. Your doctor may prescribe suitable alternatives after assessing your condition.
Below is the list of medicines, which have the same composition, strength and form as Acnex 20 MG Capsule, and hence can be used as its substitute.
Ajanta Pharma Ltd
Glenmark Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Zydus Cadila
Abbott Healthcare Pvt. Ltd
Wockhardt Ltd
Missed Dose instructions
Skip the missed dose and continue with the regularly scheduled dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up for the missed dose.
Overdose instructions
Contact a doctor immediately if an overdose with this medicine is suspected. Symptoms of overdose may include a headache, dizziness, vomiting, stomach pain, tingling and stinging sensation of the skin etc.
India
United States
Japan
Whenever you take more than one medicine, or mix it with certain foods or beverages, you're at risk of a drug interaction.
Interaction with Disease
Increased pressure around the brain Major
This medicine is not recommended for use in patients having an increased pressure around the brain due to a disease or trauma. Your doctor may determine the best course of treatment in such cases.
Psychiatric disorders Moderate
Use of this medicine may worsen the symptoms of psychiatric disorders. It should be used with caution by patients suffering from mood changes, anxiety, agitation, depression etc.
Osteoporosis Minor
Use of this medicine may cause a reduction in bone density and hence should be used with caution in patients suffering from osteoporosis or other disorders affecting bone density.
Interaction with Alcohol
Alcohol
Interaction with alcohol is unknown. It is advisable to consult your doctor before consumption.
Interaction with Lab Test
Lab
Information not available.
Interaction with Food
Food
Information not available.
Interaction with Medicine
Tetracycline Major
The oral form of isotretinoin should not be used with tetracycline or other antibiotics belonging to the same category. Your doctor will determine the best course of treatment in such cases.
Ethinyl Estradiol Major
The oral form of isotretinoin should not be used with Ethinyl estradiol or other hormonal preparations belonging to the same category. Your doctor will determine the best course of treatment in such cases. It is advised to take extra precautionary measures to avoid unintended pregnancies while using this medicine.
Natural Micronised Progesterone Major
The oral form of isotretinoin should not be used with progesterone or other hormonal preparations belonging to the same category. Your doctor will determine the best course of treatment in such cases.

Popular Questions & Answers

I'm suffering acne problem and pimple problem so please tell me the solution from this problem.

B.Sc. - Dietitics / Nutrition, Nutrition Certification,Registered Dietitian
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Delhi
I'm suffering acne problem and pimple problem so please tell me the solution from this problem.
Use AHA Glow face wash once in a day. Use Sunscreen with SPF 30 daily. Use natural face pack of Multani Mitti and lemon 2 times a week. You can also use apple cider vinegar for 5 minutes after washing your face and splash it clean with water. Most important is diet- Do not eat Junk, Eat more Vegetables and fruits especially with Vitamin C.

Hello sir, this is Abhishek. I had pimples and black dots on my face. I have tried many face washes and creams but I didn't get the good results. So please suggest me the good medicines without side effects. Thank you.

B.Sc. - Dietitics / Nutrition, Nutrition Certification,Registered Dietitian
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Delhi
Hello sir,
this is Abhishek. I had pimples and black dots on my face. I have tried many face washes and creams but I ...
Hello Use Tea Tree face wash and Toner twice daily. Use AHA Glow face wash once in a day. Use Sunscreen with SPF 30 daily. Use natural face pack of Multani Mitti and lemon 2 times a week. You can also use apple cider vinegar for 5 minutes after washing your face and splash it clean with water. Most important is diet- Do not eat Junk, Eat more Vegetables and fruits especially with Vitamin C.

Many doctors are giving different treatment for pimples n acne scare n black heads. Like lemon juice .rose water .clean n clear face wash .acnex soap etc. So please give me one best medicine to use in this products .am confusing what to use in this many products .its my humble request to dermatologist give me one best one .thank you.

B.Sc. - Dietitics / Nutrition, Nutrition Certification,Registered Dietitian
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Delhi
Many doctors are giving different treatment for pimples n acne scare n black heads. Like lemon juice .rose water .cle...
One good solution for you - 1. In the morning wash with Sebamed face wash 2. Use Tea tree toner after that. 3. Then use neutrogena oil free cream with sunscreen. At night - Again use the same face wash Pat face dry and apply Retino-A after 20 mins of drying the face.

Sir I used so many products to remove pimples n acne scare n black heads. But not able to remove that .sir plzzz give me a best product to remove pimples n acne scare on my face as much as possible within 1 month I want to remove this all. So plzzz give any best treatment. Thank u.

BHMS
Homeopath, Ludhiana
Sir I used so many products to remove pimples n acne scare n black heads. But not able to remove that .sir plzzz give...
Use clean n clear face wash twice a day. If your skin is dry then use good quality face cream which is non sticky. You can make moisturiser at home. Take rose water, glycerine and lemon in equal quantity. Mic them and preserve in a bottle. Use it twice a day on face. It also help in reducing pimples and scars. Drink lots of water. Avoid fried things and bakery products. Drink lots of water. Avoid too much tea and coffee. Take good sleep. Avoid stress. You need medicine to compelet removal of pimples and scars. Consult me for medicine.

Popular Health Tips

Whiteheads - What Are They & How You Can Get Rid Of Them?

Dermatologist
Dermatologist, Delhi
Whiteheads - What Are They & How You Can Get Rid Of Them?

Similar to blackheads are whiteheads, which develop on our skin. Both blackheads and whiteheads are caused due to clogged pores. However, as opposed to blackheads, whiteheads cannot be extracted by squeezing. Whiteheads are a form of acne that is referred to as closed comedo. They appear on the skin as small round white or light-coloured bumps. When excess oil is secreted in the skin, dead skin cells clog the pore area and block the pore opening, whiteheads are formed. Unlike blackheads that keep the pore open, whiteheads, on the other hand, block the pores.

Causes of whiteheads
Clogged pores are the prime reason that causes whiteheads, and they can occur due to any of the following reasons:

  • Excessive oil secretion or sebum
  • Hormonal changes occurring due to puberty, pregnancy, and menstruation
  • Birth control pills
  • Sweating and humidity
  • Use of certain cosmetics or products that are harmful
  • Eating excessive oily or greasy foods
  • Genetic predisposition


Treatment of whiteheads
Over-the-counter (OTC) creams or prescribed medications by a dermatologist are the ideal treatments for whiteheads. Self-care and some preventive measures will also keep them at bay. OTC creams that contain salicylic acid, benzoyl peroxide, resorcinol or sulphur may be helpful. With extreme conditions, oral medications like isotretinoin, or Accutane may be prescribed, but these come with potential side effects.

Self-care tips 
Practising some of the following preventive self-care measures will prevent formation of whiteheads:
Wash your skin twice daily with lukewarm water and mild soap.

  • Don’t squeeze pimples.
  • Practice caution while shaving.
  • Avoid excessive exposure to sunlight.
  • Use oil-free skin products.
  • Remove makeup before going to bed.
  • Opt for non-comedogenic or non-pore-clogging products.
  • Wear loose-fitting clothing made of non-synthetic fabrics to let your skin breathe.
  • Wash your hair regularly.
  • Use fragrance-free water-based emollient for dry skin.
  • Continue your skincare regimen.

Here are some remedies you can try to get rid of whiteheads:

  1. Baking soda scrub: Make a homemade scrub mixing one tsp. of baking soda with enough water to make a paste. Scrub it into the problem area. Let it dry for 15-20 minutes and wash it off with lukewarm water. Baking soda is a natural exfoliant and astringent that eradicates all impurities, which clog the pores. It also balances the oil production in the skin.
  2. Tea tree oil: Dab a cotton swab with tea tree oil and apply it on the whiteheads to prevent bacterial infection.

The above are just some measures to avoid whiteheads. If the problem persists, then it's time to seek medical assistance and schedule an appointment with a dermatologist to eradicate these pesky whiteheads.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4336 people found this helpful

All About Acne Vulgaris

MBBS, DHMS-Harvard, Masters in Clinical Dermatology
Dermatologist, Chandigarh
All About Acne Vulgaris

Acne vulgaris is a common chronic skin disease involving blockage and/or inflammation of pilosebaceous units (hair follicles and their accompanying sebaceous gland). Acne can present as noninflammatory lesions, inflammatory lesions, or a mixture of both, affecting mostly the face but also the back and chest.

Acne vulgaris has a multifactorial pathogenesis, of which the key factor is genetics. Acne develops as a result of an interplay of the following four factors: (1) follicular epidermal hyperproliferation with subsequent plugging of the follicle, (2) excess sebum production, (3) the presence and activity of the commensal bacteria Propionibacterium acnes, and (4) inflammation.

Acne occurs through the interplay of 4 major factors:

  • Excess sebum production
  • Follicular plugging with sebum and keratinocytes
  • Colonization of follicles by Propionibacterium acnes (a normal human anaerobe)
  • Release of multiple inflammatory mediators

The most common trigger is

  • Puberty

During puberty, surges in androgen stimulate sebum production and hyperproliferation of keratinocytes.

Other triggers include

  • Hormonal changes that occur with pregnancy or the menstrual cycle
  • Occlusive cosmetics, cleansers, lotions, and clothing
  • High humidity and sweating
  • Associations between acne exacerbation and diet, inadequate face washing, masturbation, and sex are unfounded. Some studies suggest a possible association with milk products and high-glycemic diets. Acne may abate in summer months because of sunlight’s anti-inflammatory effects. Proposed associations between acne and hyperinsulinism require further investigation. Some drugs and chemicals (eg, corticosteroids, lithium, phenytoin, isoniazid) worsen acne or cause acneiform eruptions.
  • Acne results in a variety of lesions. The most common acne locations include the face, neck, chest, and back, where the most sebaceous glands are located. Along the jaw line is a common location in adults. "Blackheads" (open comedones) and "whiteheads" (closed comedones) are follicular plugs that are either sitting below the skin surface (whitehead) or oxidized from being exposed to the air (blackhead). Papules are small pink to reddish-brown bumps, pustules are pus-filled lesions, and nodules or cysts are deeper pus-filled lesions.
  • Mild acne consists of a few papules/pustules and/or comedones. Moderate acne has an increased number of lesions. Severe acne has numerous comedones, papules, pustules, and may have painful nodules.
  • Acne can result in permanent scars, which can appear to be depressions in the skin or hyperpigmentation, which is dark red or brown flat marks where the acne lesions were.

Treatment

  • Comedones: Topical tretinoin
  • Mild inflammatory acne: Topical retinoid alone or with a topical antibiotic, benzoyl peroxide, or both
  • Moderate acne: Oral antibiotic plus topical therapy as for mild acne
  • Severe acne: Oral isotretinoin
  • Cystic acne: Intralesional triamcinolone
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What is Scarring Alopecia?

Dermatologist
Dermatologist, Delhi
What is Scarring Alopecia?

Scarring Alopecia, otherwise called Cicatricial Alopecia, alludes to a gathering of hair loss issue that might be diagnosed in up to 3% of hair loss patients. It happens worldwide in generally healthy men and women of any age.

Every particular diagnosis inside this class is genuinely uncommon, yet a few cases incorporate analyzing Cellulitis, Eosinophilic Pustular Folliculitis, Follicular Degeneration Disorder (beforehand called "Hot Brush" Alopecia), folliculitis decalvans, lichen planopilaris, and pseudopelade of Brocq, to give some examples. Scarring Alopecia may likewise be a piece of a significantly bigger condition, for example, Chronic Lupus Erythematosus, where numerous organs of the body can be influenced.

While there are many types of Scarring Alopecia, the normal topic is a conceivably changeless and irreversible demolition of hair follicles and their Replacement with scar tissue.

Most types of Scarring Alopecia initially happens as little Patches of Hair Loss that may extend with time. Now and again the hair loss is steady, without recognizable indications, and may go unnoticed for quite a while. In different examples, the hair loss is related with Serious Itching, Burning, and Pain, and is quickly dynamic.

The Scarring Alopecia Patches normally appear to be somewhat unique from Alopecia Areata in that the edges of the Bald Patches look more "battered." The annihilation of the hair follicle happens beneath the skin surface so there may not be much too really observe on the scalp skin surface other than Patchy Hair Loss. Influenced areas might be smooth and clean, or may have redness, scaling, expanded or diminished pigmentation, or may have risen rankles with fluids or Pus originating from the influenced area.

These visual markers may help with diagnosis; however it is hard to diagnose a Scarring Alopecia just from the pattern of the hair loss and the nature of the scalp skin. Regularly while Scarring Alopecia is suspected, at least one Skin Biopsies are done to affirm the diagnosis and help recognize the specific type of Scarring Alopecia. A little biopsy of 2 to 4 mm in distance across is taken and analyzed under a microscope. A Pathologist or Dermatologist will search for annihilation of the hair follicles, scar tissue deep in the skin, and the presence and area of aggravation in relation to the hair follicles.

Regularly, the early phases of a Scarring Alopecia will have Inflammatory Cells around the hair follicles, which, numerous scientists believe, actuates the demolition of the hair follicles and advancement of scar tissue. In any case, there is some argument about this among Dermatologists, as in some cases a biopsy from a Scarring Alopecia person shows very low irritation.

Scarring Alopecia quite often burns out. The Bald Patches quit growing and any irritation, tingling, burning, or pain goes away. In this end phase; another skin biopsy generally demonstrates no inflammation around hair follicles. Bald areas more often than not have no more hair follicles. Here and there, however, hair follicles, in any event those at the fringe of a Bald Patch, are not totally annihilated and they can re-grow, but rather frequently all that is left are only a couple of Longitudinal Scars deep in the skin to indicate where the hair follicles used to be.

Treatment

Scarring Alopecia can include a great deal of harm and lasting Hair Loss. Hence treatment of Scarring Alopecia ought to be very forceful. The nature of treatment changes relying upon the specific Diagnosis. Scarring Alopecia’s that include for the most part Lymphocyte Inflammation of hair follicles, for example, Lichen Planopilaris and Pseudopelade, are by and large treated with Corticosteroids in topical creams and by Injections into the affected skin. Likewise, Antimalarial and Isotretinoin Medications might be utilized.

For Scarring Alopecia’s with aggravation of generally Neutrophils or a blend of cells, treatment includes Antibiotics and Isotretinoin. All the more tentatively, drugs like Methotrexate, Tacrolimus, Cyclosporin, and even Thalidomide have been utilized to treat a few structures.

Once a Scarring Alopecia has achieved the burn out stage and there has been no more Hair Loss for a couple of years, Bald areas can be either surgically expelled on the off chance that they are not very huge or the Bald Patches can be transplanted with hair follicles taken from unaffected areas.

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Gram Negative Folliculitis - How It Can Be Treated?

MBBS, Diploma in Venerology & Dermatology (DVD)
Dermatologist, Thane
Gram Negative Folliculitis - How It Can Be Treated?

Gram-negative folliculitis is an infection of the skin. It is caused by gram-negative organisms. This can occur in patients, who are suffering from acne vulgaris and rosacea. In these patients, the acne gets resistant to drugs or antibiotics due to its prolonged use. This disease was first discovered by Fulton in 1968. People suffering from aids may also develop this infection.

Complications
Gram negative folliculitis can cause other skin conditions including the following ones:
1. Spa pool folliculitis is a pseudomonas infection.
2. Folliculitis caused by aeromonas hydrophila: This happens due to exposure of injured skin to contaminated water.

The appearance of Gram-negative folliculitis: It looks like rash similar to that of acne. Often patients mistake it to be the worst form of acne. In most cases, Gram-negative folliculitis leads to superficial pustules with lesser papules and comedones. These are caused by Klebsiella, Escherichia and Serratia species. In rare cases, it forms deeper lesions, which are nodular and cyst-like. These are caused due to infection by Proteus species. This microbe fails to penetrate deeper layers of the skin. The lesions are found on the upper lip, under the nose and on cheeks.

Diagnosis: When acne gets unresponsive to antibiotics, you should suspect it to be a case of gram-negative folliculitis. It is diagnosed by cytology. The colour of the bacteria in gram stain appears red or pinkish. Bacterial culture is conducted to identify the species.

Treatment: The treatment of gram-negative folliculitis can be done by using isotretinoin and other systematic antibiotics. Isotretinoin is a complex compound of beta-carotene and is effective for treating severe and unresponsive nodulocystic acne. This has been proved best for the eradication of facial lesions and nasal carriage in two to three months. Recurrence of the lesions is not seen.

Acne in Children

MBBS, Diploma in Child Health
Pediatrician, Hyderabad
Acne in Children

What is acne?

Acne is a disorder of the hair follicles and sebaceous glands. Hair follicles are the areas around the base or root of each hair. Sebaceous glands are the tiny glands that release oil (sebum) into the hair follicles. The sebum moistens the skin and hair. The sebum and hair get to the skin surface through tiny holes called pores. 

Acne is very common. Most children and young adults between ages 11 and 30 will have acne at some point. Acne most often begins in puberty. But it can happen at any age. There are different types of acne that affect newborns, infants, younger children, and adults. 

Acne may occur when the pores gets clogged with dead skin cells and oil. Bacteria that are normally on the skin may also get into the clogged pore. Acne comes in several types. One type is a comedone. This is a plug of sebum in the hair follicle. They are either closed whiteheads, or open blackheads. These are not inflamed or infected.

Inflamed acne causes red, painful bumps or sores. The sores may be infected with bacteria. This type of acne includes:

  • Pustule. Bacteria cause the hair follicle to be inflamed. Pustules are closer to the skin surface.
  • Papule. The wall of the hair follicle gets irritated. Papules are deeper in the skin.
  • Nodule. These are larger, deeper, and more solid.
  • Cyst. This is a nodule with pus.

What causes acne?

The cause of acne is not fully understood. Acne is linked with:

  • Hormonal changes during puberty, pregnancy, and the menstrual cycle
  • Rising levels of male sex hormones (androgens) in both boys and girls during puberty that causes more sebum and more dead skin cells
  • Using makeup or cosmetics that block the pores
  • Using certain products to wash the skin
  • Wearing clothes that rub or irritate the skin
  • High levels of moisture in the air (humidity) and sweating
  • Taking certain medicines, such as corticosteroids    

Who is at risk for acne?

Being a teen (adolescent) is the greatest risk factor for acne. A family history also increases the risk for severe acne.

What are the symptoms of acne?

Acne can occur anywhere on the body. It is most common in areas where there are more sebaceous glands, such as:

  • Face
  • Chest
  • Upper back
  • Shoulders
  • Neck

Symptoms can occur a bit differently in each child. They can include:

  • Small bumps that are skin-colored or white (whiteheads)
  • Small bumps that are dark in color (blackheads)
  • Red, pus-filled pimples that may hurt
  • Solid, raised bumps (nodules)
  • Darker areas of skin
  • Scarring

The symptoms of acne can be like other health conditions. Make sure your child sees his or her healthcare provider for a diagnosis.

How is acne diagnosed?

The healthcare provider will ask about your child’s symptoms and health history. He or she will look at the areas of the body with acne. The provider may advise that your child see a doctor who specializes in skin care (dermatologist).

How is acne treated?

Treatment will depend on your child’s symptoms, age, and general health. It will also depend on how severe the condition is. The goal of acne treatment is to improve the skins appearance and to lessen the chance of scarring. Treatment for acne will include gentle, regular skin care. Your child's healthcare provider may advise:

  • Non-prescription cleansers and creams, lotions, gels, or other products
  • Prescriptions that are put on the skin (topical) or taken by mouth (oral)
  • Other therapies or procedures, such as laser therapy, light therapy, or chemical peels
  • Draining of a cyst, or injecting it with medicine

Topical medicines are often prescribed to treat acne. These can be in the form of a cream, gel, lotion, or liquid. These may include:

  • Benzoyl peroxide. This kills bacteria.
  • Antibiotics. These help stop or slow down the growth of bacteria. They also reduce inflammation.
  • Tretinoin. This stops new comedones from forming. It also encourages new skin cell growth and unplugs pimples.
  • Adapalene. This helps stop new comedones from forming.

Medicines to take by mouth may be prescribed, such as:

  • Antibiotic medicines. These may include tetracycline, doxycycline, or erythromycin. They are used to treat moderate to severe acne. 
  • Isotretinoin. This may be prescribed for severe acne that can’t be treated by other methods. It helps to prevent new acne and scarring.

What are possible complications of acne?

Acne can cause problems with self-esteem. It may cause emotional problems. It may result in depression, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts. Severe or long-term acne may cause scarring. Serious infections may also develop.

Living with acne

Acne can be a long-term condition. Early treatment can help to prevent or lessen severe acne. Help your child by:

  • Reminding your child to not pick, pop, or squeeze acne, which can spread infection and cause scars
  • Talking with your child's healthcare provider if over-the-counter treatments don’t work well
  • Considering taking your child to a dermatologist for long-term or severe acne
  • Making sure your child stops acne treatment slowly, not quickly, once acne clears
  • Having your child treat acne a few times a week to prevent it from returning, if needed
  • Making sure your child does skin care regularly and gently

When should I call my child's healthcare provider?

Call your child's healthcare provider if: 

  • Your child is upset by his or her acne
  • The acne is getting worse
  • Over-the-counter treatments are not working

Key points about acne

  • Acne is a disorder of the hair follicles and sebaceous glands.
  • Acne may happen when the pores gets clogged with dead skin cells and oil. Bacteria that are normally on the skin may also get into the clogged pore.
  • Most teens and young adults between 11 and 30 years old will have acne at some point.
  • Both over-the-counter and prescription medicines are available to treat acne.
  • Acne can have an emotional effect. This can lead to depression, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts.
  • Scarring can result from severe or long-term acne.

Next steps

Tips to help you get the most from a visit to your child’s health care provider:

  • Before your visit, write down questions you want answered.
  • At the visit, write down the names of new medicines, treatments, or tests, and any new instructions your provider gives you for your child.
  • If your child has a follow-up appointment, write down the date, time, and purpose for that visit.
  • Know how you can contact your child’s provider after office hours. This is important if your child becomes ill and you have questions or need advice.
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