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Myths About Seizures - Debunked!

Written and reviewed by
Dr. Sharanjit Singh Bedi 90% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MD-Medicine, DM - Neurology, MBA, PGD Hospital Administration, PGD Echocardiography, Fellow Neuro-Sonology, PGD Sonology
Neurologist, Jalandhar  •  43 years experience
Myths About Seizures - Debunked!

Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders. This condition can affect men and women of all ages. However, it is associated with a number of myths. As a result of these myths, epileptic patients are often discriminated against. Let’s bust a few of these myths.

Myth 1: Epilepsy is contagious
Coming in contact with an epileptic patient will not increase your risk of suffering from this condition. Epilepsy can be caused by a number of factors but is not transferable from one person to another. Factors triggering epilepsy include genetic defects, oxygen deprivation at birth, trauma to the head and strokes.

Myth 2: Epilepsy cannot be treated
There is no known cure for epilepsy but this condition can be managed with treatment. Treatment for epilepsy can take many forms. The most common amongst these is medication to reduce and stop seizures. In some cases, brain surgery may also be advised. A special diet can also help control epileptic attacks. Lastly, nerve stimulation may also be used to treat epilepsy.

Myth 3: Epileptic patients cannot lead a normal life

There is nothing stopping an epileptic patient from living a normal life like everyone else. Epilepsy does not affect a person’s intelligence or any other ability. It is also a misconception that epileptic women cannot have children or that their children will also have epilepsy. With treatment and a healthy prenatal plan, they can have a healthy pregnancy and give birth to a healthy child. However, certain activities like driving should be avoided by epileptic patients.

 

Myth 4: A person having an epileptic fit should be restrained
An epileptic seizure will run its course and restraining the person may do more harm than good. Instead, the person should be made to lie down on their side. This will keep saliva from collecting in their mouth. Clear the area around the person and loosen their clothing. If the person wears spectacles, these should be removed. Do not try and put anything into the person’s mouth. An epileptic fit usually lasts for up to 5 minutes. If the person does not recover within that time, call a doctor immediately.

Myth 5: Anyone who has a seizure is epileptic
Seizures are not synonymous with epilepsy. They can be triggered by a number of factors including excessive drinking, heat, injury to the head etc. To be diagnosed with epilepsy, a person should have had two or more seizures with unrelated triggers. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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