Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}

Overview

Zonisamide

Prescription vs.OTC: Prescription by Doctor required

Zonisamide is used in the treatment of seizures. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in the brain, thus helping stop seizures.

Do not use Zonisamide if you are allergic to any of the ingredients present in it, or if you are pregnant and/or breastfeeding. Before using Zonisamide tell your doctor if you are using any prescription drugs, non-prescription drugs, or other herbal and dietary pills and supplements, or if you have recently had any surgeries, or have any upcoming surgeries scheduled. Also let your doctor know your history of medical problems, pre-existing diseases and current health conditions.

Zonisamide should be taken in doses prescribed by the doctor. Dosage depends on conditions such as medical condition, diet, age, and counteraction with other medicines.

Possible side effects of Zonisamide include confusion, depression, irritability, poor muscle coordination, and decrease in bicarbonate levels in the blood. Generally, these side effects should go away on their own after a limited period of time. In case the side effects fail to go away, you need to consult your doctor immediately. If you experience side effects other than the ones listed above, you need to contact your doctor for immediate medical assistance.

In addition to its intended effect, Zonisamide may cause some unwanted effects too. In such cases, you must seek medical attention immediately. This is not an exhaustive list of side effects. Please inform your doctor if you experience any adverse reaction to the medication.
Decreased appetite
Agitation
Headache
Is It safe with alcohol?
Epigran 100mg capsule may cause excessive drowsiness and calmness with alcohol.
Are there any pregnancy warnings?
Epigran 100mg capsule is unsafe to use during pregnancy.
There is positive evidence of human fetal risk, but the benefits from use in pregnant women may be acceptable despite the risk, for example in life-threatening situations. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any breast-feeding warnings?
Epigran 100mg capsule is probably unsafe to use during breastfeeding. Please consult your doctor.
Is it safe to drive while on this medicine?
Caution is advised when driving or operating machinery.
Does this affect kidney function?
Caution should be used in patients with renal impairment.
Does this affect liver function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Are there any missed dose instructions?
If you miss a dose of Zonisamide, skip it and continue with your normal schedule. Do not double the dose.
Below is the list of medicines, which contains Zonisamide as ingredient
Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
Abbott India Ltd
Eisai Pharmaceuticals India Pvt Ltd
Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Zydus Cadila
Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Intas Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Torrent Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
Abbott India Ltd
Whenever you take more than one medicine, or mix it with certain foods or beverages, you're at risk of a drug interaction.
Interaction with Medicine
EPTOIN 100MG TABLET
Epsolin 50Mg/2Ml Injection
BEETAL TABLET
Emgard 30Mg Tablet

Popular Questions & Answers

What is the side effects of valparin chrono. I wet my bed last night. I am on Lamactil Frisium Zonegran What is it due to?

MBBS
General Physician, Chennai
What is the side effects of valparin chrono.
I wet my bed last night. I am on Lamactil Frisium Zonegran What is it du...
It only shows you have had no sex for sometime and you need it all the aboverelaxs the muscles so the discharge.
1 person found this helpful

Popular Health Tips

Seizures - 3 Ways It Can Be Treated!

MCh - Neurosurgery, MS-General Surgery, MBBS
Neurosurgeon, Delhi
Seizures - 3 Ways It Can Be Treated!

The primary aim of the treatment in patients suffering from seizure is leasing a seizure-free life without giving way to any adverse effects. This goal can be accomplished in over 60 percent people with the help of anticonvulsants. Some patients also experience adverse effects since they suffer from a seizure which is refractory to medical therapy. Here are some of the common treatment options for seizures:

  1. Monotherapy: Sometimes, monotherapy is given as it reduces the chance of all sorts of adverse effects and even avoids drug interactions. Moreover, this type of treatment approach is much less expensive than polytherapy since many older generation of the anticonvulsant agent comprises of hepatic enzyme which is responsible for reducing the serum level of the concomitant drug which leads to an increase in the dosage level of such medicines.
  2. Social And vocational rehabilitation: People suffering from problems in psychosocial adjustments after the diagnosis may also need social and vocational rehabilitation. Many physicians do not pay enough attention to the consequences that an epilepsy diagnosis may leave on the patient. For instance, people with epilepsy may have a fear of experiencing next attack of seizure and they may be unable to work at heights or drive.
  3. Consulting an expert: It is important to refer patients with intractable spells to epileptologist or neurologist for subsequent workup. A neurosurgical consultation may also be needed when the patient has to be treated surgically.

Importance of anticonvulsant therapy
Patients who have had already suffered from recurrent attacks of unprovoked seizure may need treatment with an anticonvulsant. This treatment is not recommended until the person has risk factors for suffering from the problem yet again. The primary means of treating seizure is anticonvulsant therapy where the most suitable drug is chosen based on accurate diagnosis of the syndrome as a response to specific anticonvulsants may vary from one patient to another. The difference in response may reflect the various pathophysiologic mechanisms in different types of seizures.

Types of anticonvulsant therapy
Some of the anticonvulsant therapy medication may have multiple action mechanism while some have an only single mechanism of action. Some of the most common variants of the therapy include:

  1. Neuronal potassium channel referred to as KCNQ opener
  2. Blockers of unique binding sites such as perampanel, gabapentin, and levetiracetam
  3. H-current modulators such as lamotrigine and gabapentin
  4. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as zonisamide and topiramate
  5. Alpha-amino 3-hydroxy 5-methyl 4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor blockers like topiramate and perampanel.
  6. N and L-calcium channel blockers like zonisamide, valproate, topiramate, and lamotrigine

Even though there are so many types of drugs available, all of them cannot be used for the treatment of seizures. Doctors would evaluate the condition thoroughly before prescribing a medication that can be helpful in reducing the severity of the condition.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2723 people found this helpful

Folic Acid & Health

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
Folic acid (vitamin B9) is a water–soluble B vitamin.
It is lost in traditional Indian cooking.
Folic acid is essential for DNA repair, cell division and normal cellular growth.
Profound deficiency of folic acid during pregnancy is associated with neural tube defects, such as spina bifida in neonates.
Deficiency in adults has been associated with megaloblastic anemia and peripheral neuropathy.
In both men and women, low serum folate levels can increase homocysteine levels, which are correlated with elevated cardiovascular risk.
Low folic acid levels during pregnancy in women with epilepsy have been associated with fetal malformation, and older enzyme–inducing anti-epileptic drugs are known to reduce serum folate levels.
The risk of having a pregnancy complicated by a major congenital malformation (e.g., neural tube defect) is doubled in epileptic women taking anti epileptic drugs compared with those women with a history of epilepsy not taking these agents.
Risk is tripled with anti–epileptic drugs polypharmacy, especially when valproic acid is included.
Consensus statements recommend 0.4–0.8 mg of folic acid per day in all women planning a pregnancy. Ideally, this should be started at least 1 month prior to pregnancy if possible.
The guidelines recommend higher daily folic acid doses (4 mg/day) in women with a history of neural tube defects.
In addition, enzyme–inducing anticonvulsants, such as phenytoin, carbamazepine, primidone and phenobarbital, are known to decrease folate levels, and valproic acid may interfere with folate metabolism.
Other AEDs, such as oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and zonisamide, do not appear to alter folate levels.
Because many pregnancies are unplanned, it is recommended that folic acid supplementation be given routinely to all women of childbearing potential at 0.4 mg/day.