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Overview

Zendol 100mg Capsule

Manufacturer: Serum Institute Of India Ltd
Medicine composition: Danazol
Prescription vs.OTC: Prescription by Doctor required

Zendol 100mg Capsule is a synthetic steroid. It is used to treat fibrocystic breast disease. It also prevents hereditary angioedema in both men and women. This medication functions by decreasing the hormone levels which in turn decreases the severity of the disease.

On using Zendol 100mg Capsule you may experience side effects such as change in menstrual flow, vaginal dryness or itchiness, flushes, hair fall, weight gain. Certain adverse allergic reactions may occur such as hives, swelling of facial features and body parts, chest pain, mental/mood disorders, seizures, abnormal bleeding or bruising, unusual hair growth and reduced appetite. Contact your doctor promptly should you experience any severe reaction.

Don’t use Zendol 100mg Capsule if you are allergic to any ingredient contained within it or if your are breastfeeding a baby or you have vaginal bleeding or kidney/liver/heart disorders or have a history of blood clot. Before using this medication notify your physician if you are allergic to any substance/food/medicine, you are taking any other medication, you have high cholesterol levels, you suffer from migraines and if you are pregnant.

The dosage needs to be prescribed by your supervising doctor. The usual dose in adults for treating endometriosis is 100-200 mg orally twice daily.

mennorhagia
In addition to its intended effect, Zendol 100mg Capsule may cause some unwanted effects too. In such cases, you must seek medical attention immediately. This is not an exhaustive list of side effects. Please inform your doctor if you experience any adverse reaction to the medication.
Headache
Hoarseness of voice
Increased hair growth
Edema
Breast size decreased
Weight gain
Acne
Hot flushes
Altered libido
Muscle cramp.
Is It safe with alcohol?
Interaction with alcohol is unknown. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any pregnancy warnings?
Gonablok 200mg capsule is highly unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Human and animal studies have shown significant adverse effects on the foetus. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any breast-feeding warnings?
Gonablok 200mg capsule is probably unsafe to use during breastfeeding. Please consult your doctor.
Is it safe to drive while on this medicine?
There is no interaction between driving and consuming this drug. So dose alteration is not needed.
Does this affect kidney function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Does this affect liver function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Below is the list of medicines, which have the same composition, strength and form as Zendol 100mg Capsule, and hence can be used as its substitute.
Win-Medicare Pvt Ltd
Win-Medicare Pvt Ltd
Sanzyme Ltd
Sanofi India Ltd
United Biotech Pvt Ltd
Are there any missed dose instructions?
If you miss a dose of Danazol, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular schedule. Do not double the dose.
Whenever you take more than one medicine, or mix it with certain foods or beverages, you're at risk of a drug interaction.
Interaction with Medicine
Evafem 2Mg Tablet
TACSANT 0.5MG CAPSULE
LIPICURE 10MG TABLET
ATORSAVE 20MG TABLET
Disclaimer: The information produced here is best of our knowledge and experience and we have tried our best to make it as accurate and up-to-date as possible, but we would like to request that it should not be treated as a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis or treatment.

Lybrate is a medium to provide our audience with the common information on medicines and does not guarantee its accuracy or exhaustiveness. Even if there is no mention of a warning for any drug or combination, it never means that we are claiming that the drug or combination is safe for consumption without any proper consultation with an expert.

Lybrate does not take responsibility for any aspect of medicines or treatments. If you have any doubts about your medication, we strongly recommend you to see a doctor immediately.

Popular Questions & Answers

Hi What is the best treatment for disease - aiha ( acute immune haemolytic anaemia?

Master of Physical Therapy MPT CARDIO, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Rajkot
Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (aiha) is caused by autoantibody-induced hemolysis (the premature destruction of circulating red blood cells); usually idiopathic, it is also associated with infection, lymphoproliferative disorders, autoimmune diseases, and some drugs hallmark findings include: anemia with elevated reticulocyte count in the absence of blood loss; a positive direct antiglobulin (coombs) test; and spherocytes or rbc aggregates on the peripheral blood smear. Much literature exists regarding the treatment of aiha. Efficacy of treatment depends on the correct diagnosis of either warm- or cold-type aiha. Warm-type aiha is usually a more insidious disease, not treatable by simply removing the underlying cause. First-line therapy for this is usually with corticosteroids, such as prednisolone. Following this, other immunosuppressants are considered, such as rituximab, danazol, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, or cyclosporine. Cold agglutinin disease is treated by avoiding the cold or sometimes with rituximab. Removal of the underlying cause is also important. Paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria is treated by removing the underlying cause, such as infection.
1 person found this helpful

Popular Health Tips

What It Really Means to Have Endometriosis

DGO, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Delhi
What It Really Means to Have Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a painful condition where the endometrium tissue lining the walls of the uterus, grows as implants outside the womb of the patient. This can lead to a number of painful conditions and is often considered as a common cause behind severe pelvic pain, as far as women are concerned. Here is all you need to know about Endometriosis and pelvic pain:

  1. Painful Menstruation: Depending on the stage of the condition, the implants could remain on the surface or go deeper into the ovaries which may cause acute and severe problem during ovulation as well as the menstrual cycles. This is one of the symptoms that one must not ignore. If you are having painful cramps that affect the pelvic area and the abdomen, and if these cramps last throughout the duration of the cycle, then there are strong chances that you are experiencing the pain that comes with Endometriosis. 
  2. Pain During and After Intercourse: While there are many reasons why women may face pain during intercourse, it may be noted that vaginal and pelvic pain that come during and after intercourse could point towards the presence of Endometriosis which is causing irritation and discomfort due to the implants. 
  3. Bowel Movements and Urination: Usually, pelvic pain may trickle down to and also get activated by the bowels when there is a motion as well as urination. This is a common problem that can cause pain which spreads throughout the region if the patient is suffering from Endometriosis. 
  4. Bloating and Other Symptoms: When the abdomen and nearby regions face bloating due to the implants and their painful spread, the pelvic region as a whole bears the brunt in terms of severe pelvic pain. The bloating and other symptoms like loose motions and constipation can also create pain in the abdomen and pelvic region on a persistence basis. Sharp pains may also shoot up and down the lower back due to such symptoms which should not be ignored if they do not abate within a few days. 
  5. Misdiagnosis: Many times, the bloating and pelvic pain may be linked with pelvic inflammatory disease which causes pain in the muscles and joints. But if you are having pain in the abdomen as well as problems during your menstrual cycle, then it may be helpful to have the tests for Endometriosis done as well. 

In order to diagnose the condition, the doctor must ensure that proper imaging tests like MRI and CT scans as well as an ultrasound with lab tests based on blood samples have been conducted. The pelvic pain that comes with this condition can be treated with the help of pain relievers like ibuprofen and aspirin.

TREATMENT-

Medical Treated of Endometriosis-

Surgical Treatment-

The surgical management of endometriosis involves careful consideration of the indications for surgery, surgical techniques, surgeon experience, preoperative evaluation and ancillary techniques.

Surgery may be either 'conservative' or 'definitive'. Conservative surgical management of endometriosis has the goal of restoring normal anatomy and relieving pain. This approach is most often applied to women of reproductive age who wish to conceive in the future or to avoid induction of menopause at an early age. It may involve:

  • direct ablation,
  • lysis, or excision of lesions,
  • interruption of nerve pathways,
  • removal of ovarian endometriomas,
  • excision of lesions invading adjacent organs (bowel, bladder, appendix, or ureter).

Definitive surgery involves bilateral oophorectomy to induce menopause and may include removal of the uterus and fallopian tubes and, ideally, excision of all visible endometriotic nodules and lesions. It should be considered in women who have significant pain and symptoms despite conservative treatment, do not desire future pregnancies, or are undergoing hysterectomy because of other pelvic conditions, such as menorrhagia or fibroids.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2858 people found this helpful

4 Ways To Manage Endometriosis!

EMDR, FRCOG (LONDON) (Fellow of Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists), MFSRH , Diploma in psychosexual therapy, Medical diploma in clinical Hypnosis, Diploma in Evidence Based Healthcare, DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MD - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, MBBS
Gynaecologist, Pune
4 Ways To Manage Endometriosis!

When tissues that usually grow inside the uterus, start growing outside the organ, it is called endometriosis. Painful periods, pain during sex, pain while urinating or bowel movements, extreme bleeding, fatigue, infertility, diarrhea, bloating and nausea are some of the symptoms of endometriosis.

Treating endometriosis usually depends on the following factors

  1. Age
  2. Severity of symptoms
  3. Severity of the disease
  4. Future plans for children

Depending on these the doctor might opt for any of the following treatments

  1. Medication for Pain: If the symptoms are mild, then the doctor will prescribe some pain killers like Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. 
  2. Hormone Therapy: Hormone therapy is effective, but once you stop them, your symptoms may come back. Some of the hormone therapies include: 
    • Hormonal Contraceptives: Birth control pills, vaginal rings and patches are useful in controlling the hormones that are responsible for tissue build-up outside the uterine cavity. 
    • MedroxyprogesteroneThis drug stops menstruation, which in turn stops the tissue build-up and put an end to all the symptoms. But on the other hand, gaining weight, low bone production and depression are some of the common effects of this drug. 
    • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) antagonists and agonists: Hormones that stimulate ovaries are blocked by these. They bring down oestrogen levels and hence prevent menstruation. 
    • Danazol: This drug prevents menstruation and symptoms of endometriosis by blocking the hormones that stimulate the ovaries. However, Danazol may not be a favourable option because of its side effects. The drug should be avoided during pregnancy.
  3. Conservative Surgery: If you are trying to get pregnant, but you already suffer from endometriosis, then removing endometriosis surgically is a viable solution. Your uterus and ovaries will be preserved, which might increase your chances of becoming pregnant. Even suffering from severe pain might find relief from conservative surgery. 
  4. Hysterectomy: In extreme cases, the only way to deal with the symptoms is to completely remove the uterus, ovaries and cervix. Since a hysterectomy means you cannot have children, it is kept as the last option for women in their reproductive age. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a gynaecologist.
6 people found this helpful

The 4 Stages Of Endometriosis

MBBS, DNB - Obstetrics and Gynecology, DGO
Gynaecologist, Delhi
The 4 Stages Of Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a condition where the endometrial tissue lining the womb, grows outside the urethral lining. This can cause severe pelvic pain and a host of other complications, if it is not treated on time. 

Here is everything you need to know about this ailment.

Symptoms:

Owing to the location of this tissue and its painful protrusion through the lining or walls of the womb, one of the earliest and most painful symptoms experienced may include severe cramps and pain during the menstrual cycle. Also, the patient will experience pain in the lower abdomen region about a week before the onset of the cycle. Heavy bleeding as well as infertility may be experienced in such cases too. Sexual intercourse will also give rise to pain in the region, while discomfort will be felt during the bowel movements. Pain in the lower back will also be experienced throughout the menstruation period. 

Stages: There are several stages of this disease and its progression, each of which will require a different form of treatment. These four stages usually depend on the location, size, depth and number of the endometrial implants within the body of the patient.

  1. Minimal Stages: In this stage, usually there will be small wounds and lesions as well as shallow implants on the ovaries. Inflammation in the pelvic cavity can also be felt in this stage.
  2. Mild Stage: In this stage, there will also be light lesions and shallow implants which will spread over the ovaries as well as the pelvic lining.
  3. Moderate Stage: In this stage, the implants will dig deeper into the ovaries and the pelvic lining, which will result in the growth of even more lesions.
  4. Severe Stage: As the name suggests, in this stage the patient will experience deep implants along with lesions in the bowels and the fallopian tubes.

Treatment:

Non-Medical Treatments

  1. Eliminate nonorganic dairy products, beef, and chicken – because organic foods contain no added growth hormones. Increase nutrient-rich foods, especially cruciferous vegetables (broccoli cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, cabbage, and bok choy), soy, cold-water fish (small fish when possible) and fiber.
  2. Limit alcohol intake. Remember to eat protein at each meal and at each snack to keep the hormones more stable.
  3. Maintain healthy levels of body fat to limit endogenous estrogen production.
  4. Supplement with vitamins and minerals (especially calcium and magnesium) to make up for what is lacking in your daily food intake – pharmaceutical grade is the best.
  5. Supplement with omega–3 essential fatty acids as a natural anti-inflammatory.

Medical Treatments

There are varied forms of this treatment including pain relief medication for minimal to mild stage patients. Also, hormonal therapy with the help of supplements may be prescribed. Hormonal contraceptives may also be used. In such cases, medication like Danazol, Medroxyprogesterone

Gonadotripin releasing hormone agonists, and other such elements may be prescribed. Conservative surgery and radical surgery may follow, depending on the severity of the condition. Laparoscopy is the preferred form of treatment in such cases. A hysterectomy can be conducted as a final resort where the surgeon will remove the cervix as well as the uterus of the patient. This will make pregnancy impossible for the patient, thereafter. To stem estrogen production, the ovaries will also be removed. 

One must discuss all risks and complications before going in for a certain form of treatment for this ailment. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Gynaecologist.

4504 people found this helpful

Endometriosis: Signs and Symptoms You Might Be Suffering From It!

MBBS, MS - Obstetrics & Gynaecology, DNB - Obstetrics & Gynecology - Obstetrics & Gynecology
Gynaecologist, Ghaziabad
Endometriosis: Signs and Symptoms You Might Be Suffering From It!

Endometriosis is an often painful disorder in which tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus. Endometriosis most commonly involves your ovaries, fallopian tubes and the tissue lining your pelvis. Rarely, endometrial tissue may spread beyond pelvic organs.

With endometriosis, displaced endometrial tissue continues to act as it normally would — it thickens, breaks down and bleeds with each menstrual cycle. Because this displaced tissue has no way to exit your body, it becomes trapped. When endometriosis involves the ovaries, cysts called endometriomas may form. Surrounding tissue can become irritated, eventually developing scar tissue and adhesions — abnormal bands of fibrous tissue that can cause pelvic tissues and organs to stick to each other.

Endometriosis can cause pain — sometimes severe — especially during your period. Fertility problems also may develop. Fortunately, effective treatments are available.

Symptoms

The primary symptom of endometriosis is pelvic pain, often associated with your menstrual period. Although many women experience cramping during their menstrual period, women with endometriosis typically describe menstrual cramp that's far worse than usual. They also tend to report that the pain increases over time.

Common Signs and Symptoms of Endometriosis may include:

  • Painful periods (dysmenorrhea). Pelvic pain and cramping may begin before your period and extend several days into your period. You may also have lower back and abdominal pain.

  • Pain with intercourse. Pain during or after sex is common with endometriosis.

  • Pain with bowel movements or urination. You're most likely to experience these symptoms during your period.

  • Excessive bleeding. You may experience occasional heavy periods (menorrhagia) or bleeding between periods (menometrorrhagia).

  • Infertility. Endometriosis is first diagnosed in some women who are seeking treatment for infertility.

  • Other symptoms. You may also experience fatigue, diarrhea, constipation, bloating or nausea, especially during menstrual periods.

The severity of your pain isn't necessarily a reliable indicator of the extent of the condition. Some women with mild endometriosis have intense pain, while others with advanced endometriosis may have little pain or even no pain at all.

Endometriosis is sometimes mistaken for other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or ovarian cysts. It may be confused with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a condition that causes bouts of diarrhea, constipation and abdominal cramping. IBS can accompany endometriosis, which can complicate the diagnosis.

When to see a doctor

See the doctor if you have signs and symptoms that may indicate endometriosis.

Endometriosis can be a challenging condition to manage. An early diagnosis, a multidisciplinary medical team and an understanding of your diagnosis may result in better management of your symptoms.

Causes

Although the exact cause of endometriosis is not certain, possible explanations include:

  • Retrograde menstruation. In retrograde menstruation, menstrual blood containing endometrial cells flows back through the fallopian tubes and into the pelvic cavity instead of out of the body. These displaced endometrial cells stick to the pelvic walls and surfaces of pelvic organs, where they grow and continue to thicken and bleed over the course of each menstrual cycle.

  • Transformation of peritoneal cells. In what's known as the "induction theory," experts propose that hormones or immune factors promote transformation of peritoneal cells — cells that line the inner side of your abdomen — into endometrial cells.

  • Embryonic cell transformation. Hormones such as estrogen may transform embryonic cells — cells in the earliest stages of development — into endometrial cell implants during puberty.

  • Surgical scar implantation. After a surgery, such as a hysterectomy or C-section, endometrial cells may attach to a surgical incision.

  • Endometrial cells transport. The blood vessels or tissue fluid (lymphatic) system may transport endometrial cells to other parts of the body.

  • Immune system disorder. It's possible that a problem with the immune system may make the body unable to recognize and destroy endometrial tissue that's growing outside the uterus.

Risk factors

Several factors place you at greater risk of developing endometriosis, such as:

  • Never giving birth

  • Starting your period at an early age

  • Going through menopause at an older age

  • Short menstrual cycles — for instance, less than 27 days

  • Having higher levels of estrogen in your body or a greater lifetime exposure to estrogen your body produces

  • Low body mass index

  • Alcohol consumption

  • One or more relatives (mother, aunt or sister) with endometriosis

  • Any medical condition that prevents the normal passage of menstrual flow out of the body

  • Uterine abnormalities

Endometriosis usually develops several years after the onset of menstruation (menarche). Signs and symptoms of endometriosis end temporarily with pregnancy and end permanently with menopause, unless you're taking estrogen.

Complications

Infertility

The main complication of endometriosis is impaired fertility. Approximately one-third to one-half of women with endometriosis have difficulty getting pregnant. Endometriosis may obstruct the tube and keep the egg and sperm from uniting. But the condition also seems to affect fertility in less-direct ways, such as damage to the sperm or egg. Inspite of this, many women with mild to moderate endometriosis can still conceive and carry a pregnancy to term. Doctors sometimes advise women with endometriosis not to delay having children because the condition may worsen with time.

Ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer does occur at higher than expected rates in women with endometriosis. Although rare, another type of cancer — endometriosis-associated adenocarcinoma — can develop later in life in women who have had endometriosis.

Diagnosis: To diagnose endometriosis and other conditions that can cause pelvic pain, the doctor will ask you to describe your symptoms, including the location of your pain and when it occurs.

Tests to check for physical clues of endometriosis include:

  • Pelvic exam. During a pelvic exam, the doctor manually feels (palpates) areas in your pelvis for abnormalities, such as cysts on your reproductive organs or scars behind your uterus. Often it's not possible to feel small areas of endometriosis, unless they've caused a cyst to form.

  • Ultrasound. A transducer, a device that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the inside of your body, is either pressed against your abdomen or inserted into your vagina (transvaginal ultrasound). Both types of ultrasound may be done to get the best view of your reproductive organs. Ultrasound imaging won't definitively tell the doctor whether you have endometriosis, but it can identify cysts associated with endometriosis (endometriomas).

  • Laparoscopy. Medical management is usually tried first. But to be certain you have endometriosis, the doctor may advise a surgical procedure called laparoscopy to look inside your abdomen for signs of endometriosis.

While you're under general anesthesia, the doctor makes a tiny incision near your navel and inserts a slender viewing instrument (laparoscope), looking for endometrial tissue outside the uterus. He or she may take samples of tissue (biopsy). Laparoscopy can provide information about the location, extent and size of the endometrial implants to help determine the best treatment options.

Treatment for endometriosis is usually with medications or surgery. The approach you and the doctor choose will depend on the severity of your signs and symptoms and whether you hope to become pregnant.

Generally, doctors recommend trying conservative treatment approaches first, opting for surgery as a last resort.

Pain medications

The doctor may recommend that you take an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB, others) or naproxen (Aleve, others), to help ease painful menstrual cramps.

If you find that taking the maximum dose of these medications doesn't provide full relief, you may need to try another approach to manage your signs and symptoms.

Hormone therapy

Supplemental hormones are sometimes effective in reducing or eliminating the pain of endometriosis. The rise and fall of hormones during the menstrual cycle causes endometrial implants to thicken, break down and bleed. Hormone medication may slow endometrial tissue growth and prevent new implants of endometrial tissue.

Hormone therapy isn't a permanent fix for endometriosis. You could experience a return of your symptoms after stopping treatment.

Therapies used to treat endometriosis include:

  • Hormonal contraceptives. Birth control pills, patches and vaginal rings help control the hormones responsible for the buildup of endometrial tissue each month. Most women have lighter and shorter menstrual flow when they're using a hormonal contraceptive. Using hormonal contraceptives — especially continuous cycle regimens — may reduce or eliminate the pain of mild to moderate endometriosis.

  • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) agonists and antagonists. These drugs block the production of ovarian-stimulating hormones, lowering estrogen levels and preventing menstruation. This causes endometrial tissue to shrink. Because these drugs create an artificial menopause, taking a low dose of estrogen or progestin along with Gn-RH agonists and antagonists may decrease menopausal side effects, such as hot flashes, vaginal dryness and bone loss. Your periods and the ability to get pregnant return when you stop taking the medication.

  • Progestin therapy. A progestin-only contraceptive, such as an intrauterine device (Mirena), contraceptive implant or contraceptive injection (Depo-Provera), can halt menstrual periods and the growth of endometrial implants, which may relieve endometriosis signs and symptoms.

  • Danazol. This drug suppresses the growth of the endometrium by blocking the production of ovarian-stimulating hormones, preventing menstruation and the symptoms of endometriosis. However, danazol may not be the first choice because it can cause serious side effects and can be harmful to the baby if you become pregnant while taking this medication.

Conservative surgery

If you have endometriosis and are trying to become pregnant, surgery to remove as much endometriosis as possible while preserving your uterus and ovaries (conservative surgery) may increase your chances of success. If you have severe pain from endometriosis, you may also benefit from surgery — however, endometriosis and pain may return.

The doctor may do this procedure laparoscopically or through traditional abdominal surgery in more extensive cases.

Assisted reproductive technologies

Assisted reproductive technologies, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) to help you become pregnant are sometimes preferable to conservative surgery. Doctors often suggest one of these approaches if conservative surgery doesn't work. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Gynaecologist.

4034 people found this helpful

How To Manage Endometriosis?

FICMCH, Diploma In Laproscopic Surgery, Certified in Laparoscopy & Hysteroscopy, DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MBBS
Gynaecologist, Gurgaon
How To Manage Endometriosis?

When tissues that usually grow inside the uterus, start growing outside the organ, it is called endometriosis. Painful periods, pain during sex, pain while urinating or bowel movements, extreme bleeding, fatigue, infertility, diarrhea, bloating and nausea are some of the symptoms of endometriosis.

Treating endometriosis usually depends on the following factors

  1. Age
  2. Severity of symptoms
  3. Severity of the disease
  4. Future plans for children

Depending on these the doctor might opt for any of the following treatments

  1. Medication for Pain: If the symptoms are mild, then the doctor will prescribe some pain killers like Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. 
  2. Hormone Therapy: Hormone therapy is effective, but once you stop them, your symptoms may come back. Some of the hormone therapies include: 
    • Hormonal Contraceptives: Birth control pills, vaginal rings and patches are useful in controlling the hormones that are responsible for tissue build-up outside the uterine cavity. 
    • MedroxyprogesteroneThis drug stops menstruation, which in turn stops the tissue build-up and put an end to all the symptoms. But on the other hand, gaining weight, low bone production and depression are some of the common effects of this drug.
    • Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Gn-RH) antagonists and agonists: Hormones that stimulate ovaries are blocked by these. They bring down oestrogen levels and hence prevent menstruation.
    • Danazol: This drug prevents menstruation and symptoms of endometriosis by blocking the hormones that stimulate the ovaries. However, Danazol may not be a favourable option because of its side effects. The drug should be avoided during pregnancy.
  3. Conservative Surgery: If you are trying to get pregnant, but you already suffer from endometriosis, then removing endometriosis surgically is a viable solution. Your uterus and ovaries will be preserved, which might increase your chances of becoming pregnant. Even suffering from severe pain might find relief from conservative surgery.
  4. Hysterectomy: In extreme cases, the only way to deal with the symptoms is to completely remove the uterus, ovaries and cervix. Since a hysterectomy means you cannot have children, it is kept as the last option for women in their reproductive age. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a gynaecologist.
3568 people found this helpful

Table of Content

About Zendol 100mg Capsule
When is Zendol 100mg Capsule prescribed?
What are the side effects of Zendol 100mg Capsule?
Key highlights of Zendol 100mg Capsule
What are the substitutes for Zendol 100mg Capsule?
What are the dosage instructions?
What are the interactions for Zendol 100mg Capsule?