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Overview

Champix 0.5mg and 1mg Kit

Champix 0.5mg and 1mg Kit

Manufacturer: Pfizer Ltd
Medicine composition: Varenicline
Prescription vs.OTC: Prescription by Doctor required

Champix 0.5mg and 1mg Kit, a nicotinic receptor partial agonist is used for treating nicotine addiction. It works by weakly stimulating the nicotine receptors than nicotine does itself. Being a partial agonist, it decreases the cravings as well as the pleasurable effects of cigarettes and other tobacco products and hence helps a patient to quit smoking.

Champix 0.5mg and 1mg Kit is available as capsular biconvex, white or blue film-coated tablets in two strengths i.e. 0.5 mg and 1 mg for oral administration. The preferable dosage of Champix 0.5mg and 1mg Kit is 1 mg twice daily and the course of medication follows 1 week titration. From day1 to day 3, 0.5 mg once daily, should be taken. From day4 to day day 7, 0.5 mg twice daily and from day 8 to the last day of treatment, 1 mg twice daily. Champix 0.5mg and 1mg Kit should be taken for at least 12 weeks. For those who have successfully completed the course of medication, an additional 12 weeks of treatment is advisable to help in long term abstinence.

Side effects of Champix 0.5mg and 1mg Kit include neuropsychiatric symptoms and suicidality, somnambulism, angioedema and hypersensitivity reactions, serious skin reactions, interaction with alcohol, accidental injury, seizures, cardiovascular events behaviour changes, laboured breathing, anxiety or restlessness and others.

smoking addiction
In addition to its intended effect, Champix 0.5mg and 1mg Kit may cause some unwanted effects too. In such cases, you must seek medical attention immediately. This is not an exhaustive list of side effects. Please inform your doctor if you experience any adverse reaction to the medication.
Headache
Insomnia (difficulty in sleeping)
Abnormal dreams
Nasopharyngitis.
Is It safe with alcohol?
Champix 1mg tablet may cause excessive drowsiness and calmness with alcohol.
Are there any pregnancy warnings?
Champix 1mg tablet may be unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Animal studies have shown adverse effects on the foetus, however, there are limited human studies. The benefits from use in pregnant women may be acceptable despite the risk. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any breast-feeding warnings?
Unknown. Human and animal studies are not available. Please consult your doctor.
Is it safe to drive while on this medicine?
Caution is advised when driving or operating machinery.
Does this affect kidney function?
There is no interaction between renal impairment and consuming this drug. So dose alteration is not needed.
Does this affect liver function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Below is the list of medicines, which have the same composition, strength and form as Champix 0.5mg and 1mg Kit, and hence can be used as its substitute.
Are there any missed dose instructions?
If you miss a dose of Varenicline, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular schedule. Do not double the dose.
Whenever you take more than one medicine, or mix it with certain foods or beverages, you're at risk of a drug interaction.

Popular Questions & Answers

I am lady and I want to give my husband champix dissolving in milk will it work? Please advise

MBBS
General Physician, Mumbai
Please don’t try such things without your husband knowledge and infact we should plan for psychological therapy with his involvement

I have been smoking since last 6 years 7- 8 per day. I tied to quit many times by taking champix but failed. I have no cough or other problems but I suffered from pneumonia 2 times since I started smoking. Will I suffer from cancer or not. For quitting it what medication should I take.

BASM, MD, MS (Counseling & Psychotherapy), MSc - Psychology, Certificate in Clinical psychology of children and Young People, Certificate in Psychological First Aid, Certificate in Positive Psychology
Psychologist, Palakkad
Dear lybrate-user, Tobacco is addictive. Cigarette also contains 4000+ carcinogenic chemicals other than nicotine. Nicotine and other chemicals can cause cancer of different types and areas. Throat cancer, mouth cancer, lung cancer, stomach cancer and brain problems can result. Over and above smoking may also increase the risk factor of heart attack and brain stroke. Please quit smoking. The best method is to leave it and continue with your will power. There are other methods like Nicotine Replacement therapy and pharmacotherapy combined. If you’re ready to stop smoking and willing to get the support you need, you can recover from nicotine addiction and abuse abuse—no matter how bad the addiction or how powerless you feel. The first step in treating nicotine addiction is accepting that you have a problem. Confronting an addiction and accepting responsibility for your actions isn’t easy. But it’s a necessary step on the road to treatment and recovery. You should then consult a psychiatrist / psychologist who fill follow this treatment. 1. Detoxification using medicines. 2. Behavior modification with the help of therapies. 3. Counseling. 4. Medication to sustain and 5. Long term support. These given steps are essential for any addict to get effectively rid of smoking. Therefore, you need to stick to the treatment plan and cooperate with your psychiatrist / psychologist. Mind power building therapy, motivation therapy etc should help you doing so. I suggest you to consult a psychologist or de addiction therapist. Take care.
3 people found this helpful

Pulmonologist/Chest specialist - No Smoking question. I am 34 year old male. I smoke around 10-15 cigarettes in a day. I took Champix 1 mg a day and quit smoking but after stopping the medicine smoking starts again. Now I am taking 1 mg twice a day. What is the normal dosage. Should it be 1 mg once a day or twice a day? How long should be the duration of treatment?

C.S.C, D.C.H, M.B.B.S
General Physician,
Start taking the tablets one week before the quit date. The aim is to build up the dose so your body gets used to the medicine before the quit date. The usual advice is to start with 0.5 mg daily for the first three days. Then 0.5 mg twice daily on days four to seven. Then, 1 mg twice daily for 11 weeks. Take each dose with a full glass of water, preferably after eating. So, ideally, after breakfast and after your evening meal.
5 people found this helpful

I am cigarette smoker I take 12 to 16 cigarettes a day I fill dipress from last 6 month and cuff problem from last 2 year some time I can't walk or run longer-term I fill weakness and long birthing Last year I try to quiet from smoking I take" champix" starter courses from my doctor sougess but after complete course I can't control on smoking habits please suggest me proper way to quiet from this bed habits.

MBBS, MD Psychiatry, DNB Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Nagpur
It takes a lot of motivation on your part to quit smoking. The treatment includes - treatment for symptoms that occur due to stopping smoking like irritability, depression, constipation, sleep problems etc. - treatment of craving with appropriate dose of replacements - treatment of associated diseases like respiratory problems as in your case. - regular follow ups contact me online with a complete history of your smoking pattern and lifestyle with a brief history of associated complaints if any so that we can work out the best possible management for you. Good luck, take care.

I want to quit smoking and have tried various methods to quit but after a few days i'm back to the habit. Can you please suggest some medications or treatments that could help me get rid of smoking?

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Udaipur
Take 2bacoline patch 14mg/24hrs.U use it over ur back. This will be for one day. U have to use daily after bath and remove next day before bath. Along with take tab champix.

Popular Health Tips

BHARAT JYOTI, MRACGP, INCEPTOR, MD-PhD, MD - Psychiatry, FIPS, Fellow of Academy of General Education (FAGE), DPM, MBBS
Psychiatrist, Bangalore
Pharmacological Treatments to Help Quit Smoking

Why is it so hard to quit smoking?
You have probably heard this before: "Smoking is so bad for you. Why do you do it"

People start smoking for different reasons. They might think it will help calm their nerves, make them look more mature, or maybe at the time it just seemed sort of adventurous. Looking back, it was not the best choice. Many people really want to quit, but why is quitting so hard?

It is hard to quit smoking because the nicotine in cigarettes, cigars, and other tobacco products gets you hooked and keeps you hooked. Most people try as many as three times to quit before they are able to do so. Look at smoking cessation as a process instead of a one-time event. That way, if you do slip, you can focus on what you can do differently to prevent future slips and relapse. Don?t give up?you will get there.

You have probably heard a lot about how smoking is harmful, but here are some positive things you can look forward to when you do quit.

If you quit, you will:

Prolong your life
Improve your health
Feel healthier (Smoking can cause coughing, poor athletic ability, and sore throats.)
Look better (Smoking can cause face wrinkles, stained teeth, and dull skin.)
Improve your sense of taste and smell
Save money (Most smokers spend about $90 a month on cigarettes.)
Smoking increases complications for those who have diabetes.

While smoking can increase your chances of getting diabetes, it can also make managing diabetes more difficult for those who already have it. Smoking-related complications of diabetes could include retinopathy (eye disease), heart disease, stroke, vascular disease, kidney disease, nerve damage, and/or foot problems.

What options do people have?
Some people try quitting on their own before they go to their doctor, but your doctor can be very helpful. He or she may offer tips and suggest medicines, both prescription and over-the-counter, to help you "kick the habit" It is also important to tell your doctor what types of products you might use or are using to quit smoking. The doctor can make sure that suggested products will not interact with other medicines you are already taking. Remember, there is no "magic bullet" when it comes to quitting smoking. Quitting requires persistent effort.

Over-the-Counter Medicines
Nicotine-based medicines
Over-the-counter medicines that contain nicotine can be very helpful in fighting off cravings. These products will not remove all cravings, but you can use them instead of smoking to reduce your nicotine intake gradually and ease off of its addictive effects.

When you give your body a steady dose of nicotine all the time and then stop suddenly, you will have more side effects (withdrawal symptoms) that usually make quitting a lot harder. Withdrawal symptoms include irritability, headache, and the craving to smoke. Go slow and lower the dose gradually with nicotine-based products until you feel you are able to resist the cravings on your own. You will still have cravings, but they will be weaker. It is very important to have some form of social support when you decide to quit, no matter if you use products or not. Support can come from your doctor, counselor, support group, close friend, or a family member.

When considering a nicotine-based product to help you quit, be sure to tell your doctor about any conditions you might have, especially:

Asthma or breathing problems
Heart or blood vessel disease
High blood pressure
Stomach ulcer
Diabetes mellitus
Kidney disease
Liver disease
Overactive thyroid
Pheochromocytoma (PCC)
Over-the-counter treatments are typically used for up to 12 weeks as part of a smoking cessation program.

Additional things to consider when taking nicotine-based medicines

Do not smoke while you are using the nicotine-based medicines. You could risk overdosing on nicotine.
Tell your doctor about any medicines you are taking or any allergies you have.
Do not use the nicotine-based medicines if you are breastfeeding, are pregnant, or think you might be pregnant.
Keep this and all medicines out of the reach of children and pets.
Common brand names of the nicotine patch, gum, and lozenge include:

Nicorelief� (gum)
Nicorette� (gum)
NicoDerm� CQ� (patch)
Commit� (lozenge)
Transdermal nicotine patch
The patch is worn directly on the skin. Nicotine passes through the skin into your bloodstream. Some brands have patches with different strengths so you can gradually reduce your dosage. Nicotine patches are available without a prescription. If you are not sure what kind of patch to use, ask your doctor.

Always follow the instructions on the box, but here are some things to remember when using the nicotine patch:

Patches are supplied in child-resistant pouches; save the pouch for disposal of the patch.
Find a clean, dry part of the skin to apply it. Somewhere on your upper arm or torso usually works best. Try to find an area that has little hair and is without scars, cuts, burns, or rashes.
Right before applying the patch, wash your hands and the skin area with plain soap and water and dry completely. Avoid using any soap, lotion, hand cream, tanning lotion or oil, bath oil or insect repellent that contains aloe, lanolin or glycerin as a moisturizer since these agents can leave a moisturizing film on your skin, which can potentially interfere with the adherence of the patch.
When you have finished applying or removing the patch, wash your hands with water only.
Do not try to adjust the dosage by cutting the patch into sections.
Leave the patch on, even while bathing or swimming. If it falls off, do not try to re-apply it. Use a new one
Remove the patch according to the instructions on the box (usually after 16 to 24 hours).
Dispose by folding sticky ends of the patch together and putting in pouch.
When applying a new patch, choose a different place than before. Do not use the patch in the same place for at least a week.
Do not leave the patch on for longer than directed.
Remove the patch if you are going to do rigorous exercise. This might cause more nicotine to pass into your bloodstream.
If you are unsure how to use the product, be sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain.
Remove the patch if you are having a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Nicotine patches contain aluminum.
If you have vivid dreams or other sleep disturbances, try removing the patch at bedtime and applying a new one in the morning.
Common side effects of the nicotine patch:

Increased appetite
Mild headache
Irritation at the site of the patch, including itching, burning, or redness
There are other common or more serious side effects. Please read the information that comes with the product carefully, and be sure to contact your doctor if you have any questions.

Nicotine gum
Nicotine gum, like the patch, is a systemic way to receive nicotine. This means that the nicotine in the gum passes from the lining of your mouth right into your bloodstream. Like the patch, you will decrease the dosage during the recommended time (usually 12 weeks or sooner) if you are able to resist cravings on your own. Nicotine gum is sold without a prescription.

Always follow the instructions on the box, but here are some things to remember when using nicotine gum:

Use nicotine gum only when you feel the urge to smoke.
Slowly chew the gum until you begin to taste it or feel a tingling sensation in your mouth. Then stop chewing and park it between your cheek and gum. This helps release the nicotine. When the taste or tingling is almost gone, repeat these two steps for 30 minutes.
Use only one piece at a time.
Do not drink beverages (e.G, soft drinks, tea, coffee, and fruit juices) or eat food 15 minutes before or while chewing the gum.
Gradually decrease the number of pieces of gum you chew per day, until you reach three to six pieces per day. Some people can do this in less than 12 weeks. Do not chew more than twenty-four pieces in 1 day.
Try to have the nicotine gum handy at all times. You might try hard candy or using regular gum, if the nicotine gum is not available.
Nicotine gum can be difficult to use if you have dentures.
Common side effects of nicotine gum:

Belching (burping), gas, or heartburn
Increased appetite
Mild headache
Watery mouth
Jaw or muscle pain or fatigue
Sore mouth or throat
Nausea
Hiccups
There are other common or more serious side effects. Please read the information that comes with the product carefully and be sure to contact your doctor if you have any questions.

Nicotine lozenge
A nicotine lozenge, like the patch and gum, is a systemic way to receive nicotine. This means that the nicotine in the lozenge passes from the lining of your mouth right into your bloodstream.

Always follow the instructions on the box, but here are a few things to remember when using the nicotine lozenges:

Place the lozenge in your mouth; wait until it dissolves completely; and move it around from time to time without chewing. It takes around 20 to 30 minutes to dissolve.
Do not take more than one lozenge at a time or continuously use one lozenge after the other, this can cause hiccups, heartburn, or nausea.
Do not eat or drink 15 minutes prior to, during, or after use.
Do not use more than five lozenges in 6 hours or more than twenty lozenges in 24 hours.
Prescription Medicines
Nicotine nasal spray
Nicotine that can help you stop smoking also comes in the form of a nasal spray, available only by prescription. Like the patch and the gum, the amount taken is gradually decreased during a period of 12 weeks. It is to be used, like the gum and the patch, as part of a program that also includes support, education, and counseling.

Nicotrol NS� is one brand of nicotine nasal spray.

Always follow the instructions on the prescription label. Here are some other things to remember when using nicotine nasal spray:

Blow your nose prior to use.
You may gradually reduce your dose of nasal spray by skipping doses or using only half the usual amount.
Writing down the time you take the nasal spray and how much you take might be very useful when reducing your dose.
Common side effects of nicotine nasal spray:

Back pain
Constipation
Coughing
Indigestion or nausea
Runny nose
Sneezing
Watery eyes
Headache
A burning feeling in the back of the throat or nose
The nicotine nasal spray is not recommended for people with reactive airway disorders such as asthma. In addition, caution is urged in patients with chronic nasal disorders.

There are other common or more serious side effects. Please read the information that comes with the product carefully and be sure to contact your doctor if you have any questions.

Nicotine inhalant
A nicotine inhalant?available only by prescription?used for up to 6 months (initial treatment period up to 12 weeks followed by gradual reduction period of up to 12 weeks) can be part of a smoking cessation program. When the inhaler is used, nicotine passes from the lining of the mouth and throat (not the lungs) into the bloodstream. Like other nicotine products, you will decrease the dosage during the recommended time (usually several weeks) or until you are able to resist cravings on your own.

Nicotrol Inhaler� is one brand name of nicotine inhalant.

Always follow the instructions on the box, but here are some things to remember when using a nicotine inhalant:

Store the inhaler in a dry area at room temperature not to exceed 77� F or 25� C.
Write down the time you take the inhalant and how much you take. This might be very useful when reducing your dose.
The normal first dose is between six and sixteen cartridges per day.
Common side effects of nicotine inhalants:

Coughing
Indigestion
Mouth and throat irritation
Stuffy nose or runny nose
There are other common or more serious side effects. Please read the information that comes with the product carefully and be sure to contact your doctor if you have any questions.

Bupropion
Bupropion is more commonly seen under the brand names of Zyban� or Wellbutrin�. Zyban is specifically indicated for smoking cessation. It is not a nicotine-based medicine; it is an antidepressant that is only available by prescription. It is prescribed along with counseling and support to aid in smoking cessation. Bupropion might also be used to treat major depressive disorders. It usually takes 2 weeks for bupropion to take effect, so plan to quit smoking 2 weeks after beginning the treatment.

Before considering bupropion, be sure to inform your physician if you have a history of seizure disorder, bulimia, or anorexia nervosa.

Bupropion comes in tablets that are to be swallowed whole, not crushed, divided, or altered in any other way. Individual prescription strengths might vary, so if you are taking bupropion, be sure to follow the directions on the label. Ask your doctor or pharmacist any questions you have about how to take it, when to take it, any potential side effects, and the duration of treatment.

Common side effects of bupropion:

Dry mouth
Sweating
Insomnia
Rash
Headache
Dizziness
Anxiety
Restlessness
Irritability
Indigestion
Decreased appetite
There are other common or more serious side effects. Please read the Medication Guide that comes with the product carefully and be sure to contact your doctor if you have any questions.

Do not take bupropion if you have taken a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) within the last 14 days. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors are used to treat depression. Some examples include: tranylcypromine (Parnate�), phenelzine (Nardil�), and isocarboxazid (Marplan�). There are several products that might interact with bupropion, so be sure to tell your doctor about any over-the-counter and/or prescription medicines, as well as any herbal supplements you are taking.

While taking bupropion, immediately report any psychological changes (e.G, new onset depression) to your doctor.

Varenicline (Chantix�)
Varenicline, also known by the brand name Chantix, is a prescription medication that does not contain nicotine. This medicine helps to reduce the reinforcing effects of nicotine and can minimize the withdrawal effects from nicotine. It is recommended to set a quit date 1 week after initiation of varenicline therapy. Typically, this medication is taken for a minimum of 12 weeks accompanied by smoking cessation counseling. If you have stopped smoking, another 12 weeks of varenicline might be prescribed. If you have not stopped smoking after the first 12 weeks, stop taking this medication and return to your doctor for advice. Varenicline should be taken with food and a full glass (8 ounces) of water.

Varenicline can interact with over-the-counter and prescription medicines especially insulin, blood thinners, and asthma medications as well as with certain herbal supplements; therefore, it would be important to inform your physician of your entire medication regimen.

Contact your doctor immediately if you experience any psychological changes (e.G, new onset depression) while taking varenicline.

Common side effects of varenicline:

Nausea, which may dissipate over time
Headache
Insomnia
There are other common or more serious side effects. Please read the Medication Guide that comes with the product carefully and be sure to contact your doctor if you have any questions.

How could research benefit smokers who want to quit?
Researchers are testing a vaccine that could make quitting a lot less difficult. This type of treatment could potentially be used in a program, along with bupropion (Zyban) and counseling, to significantly reduce withdrawal symptoms.

2 people found this helpful

Tobacco Cessation - How It Is Good For You?

MBBS, MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Delhi
Tobacco Cessation - How It Is Good For You?

Benefits of tobacco cessation are many. You reduce your risk for hypertension, cancer, cardio-vascular diseases and other serious chronic diseases substantially, at whatever age you quit your nicotine habit. The earlier you quit, the more you benefit. If you quit before the age of 50, you bring down your risk of dying from smoking-related diseases by 50%. But if you’ve crossed 60, suffer from heart disease and/or hyper tension, you can manage these diseases better through tobacco cessation. 

Here are a few other health benefits of stopping tobacco use: 

  1. Reduces risks of heart disease, cancer especially lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 
  2. Cuts down risks of Impotence due to erectile dysfunction in men, and fertility problems in women 
  3. Optic neuropathy affects the optic nerve that conducts visual signals from the eyes to the brain 
  4. Cataract Macular degeneration is breakdown of the tissue at the back of the eye 
  5. Psoriasis 
  6. Gum disease
  7. Losing teeth early 
  8. Osteoporosis or spongy, thin bones 
  9. Complications in pregnancy i.e. women who smoke have more complications during pregnancy and have low-birth babies. 

Your food and drink also tastes better once you kick the tobacco habit. 

So, how can you stop smoking? Are there any medications and strategies available? The answer is a definite ‘Yes’. Tobacco cessation has been honed into an art these days. 

  1. Clinics: There are tobacco cessation clinics that help you with tobacco cessation. These are manned by psychiatrists, who can provide detailed information, encouragement, and tips to stop smoking. 
  2. Medications: You can use many medicines while you’re trying to stop smoking. This increases your chance of quitting and including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). NRT can be in the form of gums, sprays, patches, tablets, lozenges, and inhalers. NRT is even available without a prescription. Medicines called bupropion and varenicline also very useful. 
  3. Electronic cigarettes: Electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes are designed to look and feel like normal cigarettes. These contain a heating element that vapourises a solution and looks like smoke. Some may also contain low levels of nicotine. There is currently controversial evidence on their efficacy. 
  4. Counselling and behavioural therapy: They are both very effective too, especially if you are being guided by a cessation expert. He or she can help you with a personalised quit plan, including ways to cope with nicotine withdrawal. Apart from this, online support is also available for those who don’t have the time or money to engage in personal, face-to-face counseling. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a psychiatrist.
4486 people found this helpful

How Tobacco Cessation Is Good For You?

MD - Psychiatry
Psychiatrist, Udaipur
How Tobacco Cessation Is Good For You?

Benefits of tobacco cessation are many. You reduce your risk for hypertension, cancer, cardio-vascular diseases and other serious chronic diseases substantially, at whatever age you quit your nicotine habit. The earlier you quit, the more you benefit. If you quit before the age of 50, you bring down your risk of dying from smoking-related diseases by 50%. But if you’ve crossed 60, suffer from heart disease and/or hyper tension, you can manage these diseases better through tobacco cessation. 

Here are a few other health benefits of stopping tobacco use: 

  1. Reduces risks of heart disease, cancer especially lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) 
  2. Cuts down risks of Impotence due to erectile dysfunction in men, and fertility problems in women 
  3. Optic neuropathy affects the optic nerve that conducts visual signals from the eyes to the brain 
  4. Cataract Macular degeneration is breakdown of the tissue at the back of the eye 
  5. Psoriasis 
  6. Gum disease
  7. Losing teeth early 
  8. Osteoporosis or spongy, thin bones 
  9. Complications in pregnancy i.e. women who smoke have more complications during pregnancy and have low-birth babies. 

Your food and drink also tastes better once you kick the tobacco habit. 

So, how can you stop smoking? Are there any medications and strategies available? The answer is a definite ‘Yes’. Tobacco cessation has been honed into an art these days. 

  1. Clinics: There are tobacco cessation clinics that help you with tobacco cessation. These are manned by psychiatrists, who can provide detailed information, encouragement, and tips to stop smoking. 
  2. Medications: You can use many medicines while you’re trying to stop smoking. This increases your chance of quitting and including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). NRT can be in the form of gums, sprays, patches, tablets, lozenges, and inhalers. NRT is even available without a prescription. Medicines called bupropion and varenicline also very useful. 
  3. Electronic cigarettes: Electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes are designed to look and feel like normal cigarettes. These contain a heating element that vapourises a solution and looks like smoke. Some may also contain low levels of nicotine. There is currently controversial evidence on their efficacy. 
  4. Counselling and behavioural therapy: They are both very effective too, especially if you are being guided by a cessation expert. He or she can help you with a personalised quit plan, including ways to cope with nicotine withdrawal. Apart from this, online support is also available for those who don’t have the time or money to engage in personal, face-to-face counseling. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!
2805 people found this helpful

Ways On How To Fight Back Addiction!

MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
Ways On How To Fight Back Addiction!

Addiction is a brain ailment that is characterized by irrational engagement in satisfying stimuli despite of argumentative circumstances. Addiction is an ailment where the brain's Reward system malfunctions and only responds to persistently greater level of addictive stimulus like morphine, cocaine, etc.

There are many varieties of addiction like alcoholism, gambling, sexual intercourse, etc. These force a person to isolate himself from the entire society and indulge in his or her addictions. If they are not supplied with the drugs they may react violently and may even die.

Drug treatment is a type of treatment which is intended to aid the abused users stop the uncontrollable usage of drugs and protect them from the adverse effects of it. This treatment has a variety of forms and takes a lot of time as the drug abuse is a chronic disorder and cannot be treated in a short term. Below mentioned are some of the ways by which you can fight back addiction effectively.

• For individuals who are addicted to drugs such as opium and nicotine (Tobacco) are treated with drugs such as methadone, naltrexone for opium addicted individuals and with varenicline and bupropion for tobacco addicted people.

• For individuals who are greatly addicted to alcohol Disulfiram and acamprosate are the best medications that are available.

• Many individuals are addicted to the prescribed drugs and their treatment is the same as that of drug abuse that affects the brain. Like the medicine buprenorphine, can be used to treat both heroin obsession and addiction to medications for opium pain treatment.

Behavioral treatments may help people to take part in drug abuse therapies and teach ways to cope up with drugs and help them to against relapse if it occurs.

• Group therapies are the latest form of treatment that is advised to the addicted individuals. Group therapies provide the individual social support and help in enforcing behavioral incidents that will help the lead a non-drug-using lifestyle.

• Lastly individuals who are greatly addicted to alcohol or drug abuse or any kind of addictions suffer from depression and also face social, legal and family problems.

 

3 people found this helpful

Tobacco Cessation - How It Is Beneficial For You

MBBS, Diploma in Psychological Medicine
Psychiatrist, Ranchi
Tobacco Cessation - How It Is Beneficial For You

Benefits of tobacco cessation are many. You reduce your risk for hypertension, cancer, cardio-vascular diseases and other serious chronic diseases substantially, at whatever age you quit your nicotine habit. The earlier you quit, the more you benefit. If you quit before the age of 50, you bring down your risk of dying from smoking-related diseases by 50%. But if you’ve crossed 60, suffer from heart disease and/or hyper tension, you can manage these diseases better through tobacco cessation. 

Here are a few other health benefits of stopping tobacco use: 

  1. Reduces risks of heart disease, cancer especially lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD
  2. Cuts down risks of Impotence due to erectile dysfunction in men, and fertility problems in women 
  3. Optic neuropathy affects the optic nerve that conducts visual signals from the eyes to the brain 
  4. Cataract Macular degeneration is breakdown of the tissue at the back of the eye 
  5. Psoriasis 
  6. Gum disease 
  7. Losing teeth early 
  8. Osteoporosis or spongy, thin bones 
  9. Complications in pregnancy i.e. women who smoke have more complications during pregnancy and have low-birth babies. 

Your food and drink also tastes better once you kick the tobacco habit. 

So, how can you stop smoking? Are there any medications and strategies available? The answer is a definite ‘Yes’. Tobacco cessation has been honed into an art these days. 

  1. Clinics: There are tobacco cessation clinics that help you with tobacco cessation. These are manned by psychiatrists, who can provide detailed information, encouragement, and tips to stop smoking. 
  2. Medications: You can use many medicines while you’re trying to stop smoking. This increases your chance of quitting and including nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). NRT can be in the form of gums, sprays, patches, tablets, lozenges, and inhalers. NRT is even available without a prescription. Medicines called bupropion and varenicline also very useful. 
  3. Electronic cigarettes: Electronic cigarettes or e-cigarettes are designed to look and feel like normal cigarettes. These contain a heating element that vapourises a solution and looks like smoke. Some may also contain low levels of nicotine. There is currently controversial evidence on their efficacy. 
  4. Counselling and behavioural therapy: They are both very effective too, especially if you are being guided by a cessation expert. He or she can help you with a personalised quit plan, including ways to cope with nicotine withdrawal. Apart from this, online support is also available for those who don’t have the time or money to engage in personal, face-to-face counseling.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2620 people found this helpful