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Vasectomy Reversal

Written and reviewed by
Dr. Vinod Raina 90% (6429 ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi  •  18 years experience
Vasectomy Reversal

So You're Thinking About a Vasectomy Reversal?

So, you've had a vasectomy and are now thinking about having it reversed. For one reason or another, you thought that a vasectomy would be a great idea and would protect against unwanted pregnancies. Sure it made sense at the time, but now you wish that you never had it in the first place. Well, congratulations! You are now part of a very large group of men who have come to hate the very thing that they thought they would enjoy so much.

Don't get me wrong, I believe that getting a vasectomy done is a great idea. It can protect you, your assets, and your reputation from being ruined or destroyed. However, times change, and as the years go by, what you may want out of life may change. What you wanted ten or fifteen years ago may be greatly different from what you want now.

For the most part, men who want to have their vasectomy reversed are looking for one thing - to start a family. And how can you start a family if your equipment isn't working properly? In short, you can't, or you have a very, very low chance of doing so (less than 0.1%). So what do you do in this situation? You start researching how to get a vasectomy reversal, and that might lead you here.

In the surgery the doctor will decide on which type of reversal will be done, in most cases either a vasovasostomy or a vasoepididymostomy. In either case, the main objective is to reconnect the detached ends of the vas deferens tube. The main difference between the two is that a vasoepididymostomy has a much lower chance of being successful.

If you do decide to have the surgery done, the recovery period is very similar to that of a vasectomy surgery. In most cases, you will be advised not to have sex for around 2-4 weeks and you will be able to return to normal activity within a few days. You will be advised to avoid getting your scrotum wet, and within a few months and after a few sessions of semen analysis, you will be told whether or not if the surgery was a success.

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