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Overview

Eflornithine

Prescription vs.OTC: Prescription by Doctor not required

Eflornithine is used for slowing down or lessening the growth of facial hair in women. It is an enzyme inhibitor, and works by blocking the enzyme required for facial hair to grow.

Do not use Eflornithine if you are allergic to any of the ingredients present in Eflornithine. Before using Eflornithine tell your doctor if you are using any prescription drugs, non-prescription drugs, or other herbal and dietary pills and supplements, if you are allergic to certain food items or substances, if you are pregnant and/or breastfeeding, or if you have any broken skin, or any kind of sores or boils on the affected area.

Eflornithine comes in the form of a cream, which has to be applied to the affected areas of the face and/or the chin. You cannot wash the area for up to 4 hours after application of the cream. Eflornithine is only for external use, so avoid contact with eyes, mouth, nose or vaginal area.

Eflornithine has very few effects, such as skin tingling, redness of skin after application, or temporary burning and stinging if the affected area.

In addition to its intended effect, Eflornithine may cause some unwanted effects too. In such cases, you must seek medical attention immediately. This is not an exhaustive list of side effects. Please inform your doctor if you experience any adverse reaction to the medication.
Acne
Erythema
Burning discomfort
Stinging sensation
Dry skin
Rash
Tingling sensation
Irritation
Hair follicle inflammation.
Is It safe with alcohol?
No interaction found
Are there any pregnancy warnings?
Eflora 13.9% cream may be unsafe to use during pregnancy.
Animal studies have shown adverse effects on the foetus, however, there are limited human studies. The benefits from use in pregnant women may be acceptable despite the risk. Please consult your doctor.
Are there any breast-feeding warnings?
Unknown. Human and animal studies are not available. Please consult your doctor.
Is it safe to drive while on this medicine?
There is no interaction between driving and consuming this drug. So dose alteration is not needed.
Does this affect kidney function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Does this affect liver function?
There is no data available. Please consult doctor before consuming the drug.
Are there any missed dose instructions?
If you miss a dose of Eflornithine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular schedule. Do not double the dose.
Below is the list of medicines, which contains Eflornithine as ingredient
Sun Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd
Ajanta Pharma Ltd
Zydus Cadila
Eris Life Sciences Pvt Ltd
Whenever you take more than one medicine, or mix it with certain foods or beverages, you're at risk of a drug interaction.

Popular Questions & Answers

Is it good to use eflornithine cream for men? Does it really stops hair on cheeks and under eyes for men?

MS - General Surgery, MCh - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Cosmetic/Plastic Surgeon, Jaipur
Is it good to use eflornithine cream for men? Does it really stops hair on cheeks and under eyes for men?
NO and YES. No it is not a good idea to use in men. But if you want you can surely use it it just keep in mind that 1. Men have much more hair and the effect of cream will not be as good as that in women (it is basically used for women) 2. You will revert to previous state with in 4 months of stopping the treatment. Chances of allergies and acne are more. 3. There are better ways to get rid of extra facial hair like LASER /IPL hair reduction (beard shapping) which is a relatively permanent solution to extra hair on the face.

I am 26 year old male ,I am suffering from hair growth on my cheeks though I had taken laser treatment for 6 sessions but no improvement. What can I do further to stop hair growth on my cheeks?

MD - (Dermatology & STD)
Dermatologist, Bangalore
I am 26 year old male ,I am suffering from hair growth on my cheeks though I had taken laser treatment for 6 sessions...
Eflornithine 13% cream can be used. But results are slow. You can take further sessions of laser rx. Some ppl need longer duration of treatment.
1 person found this helpful

I am 17 years old boy and I have unwanted hairs on my face and few in my nose give me any solution but no laser treatment.

MCh Plastic Surgery, MS - General Surgery
Cosmetic/Plastic Surgeon, Bangalore
I am 17 years old boy and I have unwanted hairs on my face and few in my nose give me any solution but no laser treat...
Hello lybrate-user, Laser is a safe method and gives good results. If you not willing for laser you can use Eflornithine cream which reduces hair growth.

I want hair remove on my forehead for permanently. Give me suitable solutions of these problem.

MCh Plastic Surgery, MS - General Surgery
Cosmetic/Plastic Surgeon, Bangalore
I want hair remove on my forehead for permanently. Give me suitable solutions of these problem.
Hello, Laser hair removal is safe and effective treatment. You will require 6-8sessions with maintainance once 6mo or a yr. Also there are eflornithine based creams which reduce hair growth.

It is my first pregnancy I am 5 month pregnant I want to know that can we use hair removal cream in pregnancy.

MCh Plastic Surgery, MS - General Surgery
Cosmetic/Plastic Surgeon, Bangalore
It is my first pregnancy I am 5 month pregnant I want to know that can we use hair removal cream in pregnancy.
Hello, Eflornithine based creams are not assessed for safety in pregnancy and during breast feeding. It is better to avoid creams during pregnancy. Laser are safe options.

Popular Health Tips

Hirsutism - How Best Can it Be Managed?

MD - Dermatology , Venereology & Leprosy, MBBS
Dermatologist, Delhi
Hirsutism - How Best Can it Be Managed?

Most women love the idea of having healthy and silky skin that feels smooth to touch. However, due to a certain reasons, some women can have excessive, unwanted hair on their chest, hands and face. The pattern is similar to what is seen in men. This can be a major psychological problem. Read on to know more about some of the common reasons for this and how it can be managed:

Common causes behind it
Hair pattern is largely determined by genetic makeup and hirsutism is often caused by genes, hormones, or medication which is another main cause is the excessive amount of testosterone in women. Conditions like obesity, polycystic ovaries disease, ovarian tumours, adrenal tumours, Cushing’s syndrome and drugs like Danazol can cause excessive androgen hormones. Women with this condition may also have a deep voice, huge breasts, enlarged clitoris, severe acne and may also suffer from hair loss. These symptoms are collectively referred to as virilisation.

Ways to control hirsutism
The treatment is aimed at removing the unwanted hair and treating the underlying cause. A combination of medications and procedures can help in removing the excessive hair.

  1. Weight loss: Reducing weight makes the body produce less of the male hormone, and so hirsutism is controlled.
  2. Female hormone replacement: Birth control pills are a good choice for women who do not want to get pregnant. They control the androgen hormone production and reduce hair growth and other characteristics.
  3. Anti-androgens: Spironolactone is an anti-androgen which counters the effect of testosterone; however, these have side effects and self-medication is not advisable.
  4. Topical creams: The face is the major area of concern and so creams like eflornithine are useful to control hair growth on the face.

Procedures

Depending on the patient’s severity of the problem and expectations, the following procedural options are available. While some of these can be done at home, others might require a visit to a doctor.

  1. Shaving: To be done repeated as and when the growth occurs.
  2. Tweezing: Isolated strands of hair can be removed with a tweezer.
  3. Waxing: This is useful in removing hair from large areas (chest, hands, etc.)
  4. Bleaching creams or lotions: The hair stays in place but is lightened in colour to give it a camouflaged appearance.
  5. Depilatory creams, lotions, or gels: These break down the hair follicles and prevent hair growth.
  6. Electrolysis: A small amount of electric current is applied to the hair follicle to destroy it, thereby controlling hair growth.
  7. Laser hair treatment: A small beam of highly concentrated light is applied to the affected area to damage the hair follicles and control hair growth.

Hirsutism is definitely not desirable, but there are definitely ways to manage the problems and get back to having a smooth, silky skin.

If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a doctor and ask a free question.

2352 people found this helpful

How To Manage Hirsutism?

MBBS, Diploma in Venerology & Dermatology (DVD), DDV, MD - Dermatology , Venereology & Leprosy
Dermatologist, Pune
How To Manage Hirsutism?

Most women love the idea of having healthy and silky skin that feels smooth to touch. However, due to a certain reasons, some women can have excessive, unwanted hair on their chest, hands and face. The pattern is similar to what is seen in men. This can be a major psychological problem. Read on to know more about some of the common reasons for this and how it can be managed:

Common causes behind it
Hair pattern is largely determined by genetic makeup and hirsutism is often caused by genes, hormones, or medication which is another main cause is the excessive amount of testosterone in women. Conditions like obesitypolycystic ovaries disease, ovarian tumours, adrenal tumours, Cushing’s syndrome and drugs like Danazol can cause excessive androgen hormones. Women with this condition may also have a deep voice, huge breasts, enlarged clitoris, severe acne and may also suffer from hair loss. These symptoms are collectively referred to as virilisation.

Ways to control hirsutism
The treatment is aimed at removing the unwanted hair and treating the underlying cause. A combination of medications and procedures can help in removing the excessive hair.

  1. Weight loss: Reducing weight makes the body produce less of the male hormone, and so hirsutism is controlled.
  2. Female hormone replacement: Birth control pills are a good choice for women who do not want to get pregnant. They control the androgen hormone production and reduce hair growth and other characteristics.
  3. Anti-androgens: Spironolactone is an anti-androgen which counters the effect of testosterone; however, these have side effects and self-medication is not advisable.
  4. Topical creams: The face is the major area of concern and so creams like eflornithine are useful to control hair growth on the face.

Procedures

Depending on the patient’s severity of the problem and expectations, the following procedural options are available. While some of these can be done at home, others might require a visit to a doctor.

  1. Shaving: To be done repeated as and when the growth occurs.
  2. Tweezing: Isolated strands of hair can be removed with a tweezer.
  3. Waxing: This is useful in removing hair from large areas (chest, hands, etc.)
  4. Bleaching creams or lotions: The hair stays in place but is lightened in colour to give it a camouflaged appearance.
  5. Depilatory creams, lotions, or gels: These break down the hair follicles and prevent hair growth.
  6. Electrolysis: A small amount of electric current is applied to the hair follicle to destroy it, thereby controlling hair growth.
  7. Laser hair treatment: A small beam of highly concentrated light is applied to the affected area to damage the hair follicles and control hair growth.

Hirsutism is definitely not desirable, but there are definitely ways to manage the problems and get back to having a smooth, silky skin.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4798 people found this helpful

Razor Bumps - Causes, Treatment and Prevention

MBBS, MD - Dermatology
Dermatologist, Delhi
Razor Bumps - Causes, Treatment and Prevention

What is Razor Bump (Pseudofolliculitis Barbae)?

It is an inflammatory reaction to the hair shaft entering the skin, most common in blacks who shave regularly.

Who gets razor bumps?

About 50% of black males are said to be affected. Other races can also be affected. Though the condition is most commonly reported in men, women who remove unwanted hair also suffer from this condition.

Causes of Razor Bumps-

The condition is caused by both genetic factors and various hair removal methods.

Genetic factors:

  1. Curved hair follicles and curly hair
  2. A defect in the gene for the hair protein keratin 6hf

Hair removal methods may cause razor bumps by either creating a sharp hair tip that re-enters the skin away from the hair pore (extrafollicular penetration) or by the hair shaft breaking off at different lengths and piercing the follicle from within the skin (transfollicular penetration). An inflammatory reaction is then set up in response to the hair fragments lying in the skin. The following methods may cause razor bumps:

  1. Shaving
  2. Tweezing
  3. Waxing
  4. Electrolysis

Symptoms-

  • Ingrown hairs
  • Red, skin coloured or dark bumps
  • Bumps containing pus

What are the complications of razor bumps?

  • Pigmentary problems (darkening of the area most common)
  • Scarring
  • Abscess formation
  • Psychological problems

Razor bumps are most common on the beard, however they have been reported to occur on the pubic area, legs and scalp.

The Treatment-

There are several treatment options to deal with razor bumps already present. They include:

  • Moisturizers
  • Retinoids
  • Steroids
  • Antibiotics
  • Alpha-hydroxy acids
  • Chemical peels
  • Microdermabrasion

Prevention of Razor Bumps:

It is true to say that 'prevention is better than cure'. Here are the preventions-

  • Laser hair removal is the best method of removing unwanted hair in individuals affected with this condition. The laser device is programmed to selectively target the pigment in the hair follicle, destroying it, while leaving the skin intact.
  • Electrical clippers are found by many to cause less bumps than razors. If one must shave it is important to avoid a close shave to help prevent razor bumps. The following is a guide to safer shaving methods:
    • Brush hairs with polyester sponge before shaving.
    • Wash beard, use pre-shave cream or gel.
    • Avoid double and triple blade razors.
    • Shave in the direction of hair growth.
    • Do not pull the skin taut.
    • Use a sharp blade, rinse after each stroke.
    • Apply a cold compress after shaving, then a soothing aftershave preparation.
  • Clipping hairs with a small pair of facial scissors is an option for women with few unwanted hairs.
  • Chemical depilatories (hair removal creams) are another option for hair removal.
  • Electrolysis is a permanent method of hair removal but requires several sessions. It is operator dependent and can cause bumps and scarring. Waxing and tweezing also have the potential to cause bumps.
  • Eflornithine hydrochloride is a cream that slows the growth of hair and therefore can be used in combination with a hair removal method. It is marketed for women with unwanted facial hair.
  • Anti-androgen drugs can be used in females who have hirsutism (male pattern hair growth e.g. beard hairs)
4221 people found this helpful

Razor Bumps - Why Do They Occur?

MBBS, DNB(Skin & VD)
Dermatologist, Delhi
Razor Bumps - Why Do They Occur?

It is an inflammatory reaction to the hair shaft entering the skin, most common in blacks who shave regularly.

Who gets razor bumps?

About 50% of black males are said to be affected. Other races can also be affected. Though the condition is most commonly reported in men, women who remove unwanted hair also suffer from this condition.

Causes of Razor Bumps-

The condition is caused by both genetic factors and various hair removal methods.

Genetic factors:

  1. Curved hair follicles and curly hair
  2. A defect in the gene for the hair protein keratin 6hf

Hair removal methods may cause razor bumps by either creating a sharp hair tip that re-enters the skin away from the hair pore (extrafollicular penetration) or by the hair shaft breaking off at different lengths and piercing the follicle from within the skin (transfollicular penetration). An inflammatory reaction is then set up in response to the hair fragments lying in the skin. The following methods may cause razor bumps:

  1. Shaving
  2. Tweezing
  3. Waxing
  4. Electrolysis

Symptoms-

  • Ingrown hairs
  • Red, skin coloured or dark bumps
  • Bumps containing pus

What are the complications of razor bumps?

  • Pigmentary problems (darkening of the area most common)
  • Scarring
  • Abscess formation
  • Psychological problems

Razor bumps are most common on the beard, however they have been reported to occur on the pubic area, legs and scalp.

The Treatment-

There are several treatment options to deal with razor bumps already present. They include:

  • Moisturizers
  • Retinoids
  • Steroids
  • Antibiotics
  • Alpha-hydroxy acids
  • Chemical peels
  • Microdermabrasion

Prevention of Razor Bumps:

It is true to say that 'prevention is better than cure'. Here are the preventions-

  • Laser hair removal is the best method of removing unwanted hair in individuals affected with this condition. The laser device is programmed to selectively target the pigment in the hair follicle, destroying it, while leaving the skin intact.
  • Electrical clippers are found by many to cause less bumps than razors. If one must shave it is important to avoid a close shave to help prevent razor bumps. The following is a guide to safer shaving methods:
    • Brush hairs with polyester sponge before shaving.
    • Wash beard, use pre-shave cream or gel.
    • Avoid double and triple blade razors.
    • Shave in the direction of hair growth.
    • Do not pull the skin taut.
    • Use a sharp blade, rinse after each stroke.
    • Apply a cold compress after shaving, then a soothing aftershave preparation.
  • Clipping hairs with a small pair of facial scissors is an option for women with few unwanted hairs.
  • Chemical depilatories (hair removal creams) are another option for hair removal.
  • Electrolysis is a permanent method of hair removal but requires several sessions. It is operator dependent and can cause bumps and scarring. Waxing and tweezing also have the potential to cause bumps.
  • Eflornithine hydrochloride is a cream that slows the growth of hair and therefore can be used in combination with a hair removal method. It is marketed for women with unwanted facial hair.
  • Anti-androgen drugs can be used in females who have hirsutism (male pattern hair growth e.g. beard hair). Consult an Expert & get answers to your questions!
2437 people found this helpful

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: What It Means For Your Long-Term Health

MBBS, MS - Obs and Gynae, MRCOG(London), DNB, Fellowship In Uro Gynaecology
Gynaecologist, Mumbai
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: What It Means For Your Long-Term Health

What is polycystic ovary syndrome?

PCOS is a condition that can affect your periods, fertility, hormones and aspects of your appearance. It can also affect your long-term health. It affects 4 to 12 in every 100 women.

What are polycystic ovaries?

Polycystic ovaries are slightly larger than normal ovaries and have twice the number of follicles (fluid-filled spaces within the ovary that release the eggs when you ovulate). Having polycystic ovaries does not necessarily mean that you have PCOS. Women with PCOS have symptoms as well as polycystic ovaries.

What are the symptoms of PCOS?

The symptoms of PCOS include:

  • Irregular menstrual periods—Menstrual disorders can include absent periods, periods that occur infrequently or too frequently, heavy or unpredictable periods

  • An increase in facial or body hair (hirsutism)- face, chest, abdomen and upper thighs

  • Thinning hair/loss of hair on your head (male pattern baldness)

  • Being overweight/rapid increase in weight or having difficulty losing weight

  • Difficulty becoming pregnant (reduced fertility)

  • Oily skin, acne

  • Patches of thickened, velvety, darkened skin called acanthosis nigricans

  • Skin tags, which are small flaps of excess skin in the armpits or neck area

  • Depression and psychological problems can also result from having PCOS.

The symptoms vary from woman to woman. Some women have very few and mild symptoms, while others are affected more severely by a wider range of symptoms.

PCOS is a cause of fertility problems in women. You may still become pregnant even if you do not have periods. If you do not want to become pregnant, you should seek advice from your gynaecologist about contraception.

What causes PCOS?

The cause of PCOS is not yet known but it often runs in families. If any of your relatives (mother, aunts, sisters) are affected with PCOS, your risk of developing PCOS may be increased.

The symptoms are related to abnormal hormone levels:

Testosterone is a hormone that is produced in small amounts by the ovaries in all women. Women with PCOS have higher than normal levels of testosterone and this is associated with many of the symptoms of the condition- the ovaries may be prevented from releasing an egg each month (a process called ovulation). High testosterone levels also cause the unwanted hair growth and acne seen in many women with PCOS.

Insulin is a hormone that controls the level of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. If you have PCOS, your body may not respond to insulin (this is known as insulin resistance), so the level of glucose is higher. To try to prevent the glucose levels becoming higher, your body produces even more insulin. High levels of insulin can lead to weight gain, irregular periods, fertility problems and higher levels of testosterone.

How is PCOS diagnosed?

Having polycystic ovaries does not mean you have PCOS.

Women with PCOS often have symptoms that come and go, particularly if their weight goes up and down. This can make it a difficult condition to diagnose, which means it may take a while to get a diagnosis.

A diagnosis is made when you have any two of the following:

  • Irregular, infrequent periods or no periods at all

  • An increase in facial or body hair and/or blood tests that show higher testosterone levels than normal

  • An ultrasound scan that shows polycystic ovaries

When a diagnosis is made, you may be referred to an endocrinologist (a doctor who specialises in the hormonal system).

What are the health risks for women with PCOS?

PCOS affects all areas of the body, not just the reproductive system. If you have PCOS, you are at greater risk of developing the long-term health problems discussed below.

Insulin resistance and diabetes

One or two in every ten women with PCOS go on to develop diabetes at some point. If the diabetes is untreated, this can cause damage to organs in the body.

If you have PCOS, your risk of developing diabetes is increased further if you:

  • are over 40 years of age

  • have relatives with diabetes

  • developed diabetes during a pregnancy (known as gestational diabetes)

  • are obese (a body mass index (BMI) of over 30)

High blood pressure

Women with PCOS tend to have high blood pressure, which is likely to be related to insulin resistance and to being overweight rather than to the PCOS itself. High blood pressure can lead to heart problems and should be treated.

Cancer of the womb lining (endometrium)

If you have fewer than three periods a year, the lining of the womb (endometrium) can thicken (a condition called endometrial hyperplasia) and this may lead to endometrial cancer in a small number of women over the long term.

There are various ways to protect the lining of the womb using the hormone progestogen. This may include a five-day course of progestogen tablets used every three or four months, taking a contraceptive pill or using the intrauterine contraceptive system (Mirena®). The options will depend on whether you are trying for a baby.

Depression and mood swings

The symptoms of PCOS may affect how you see yourself and how you think others see you. It can lower your self-esteem.

Snoring and daytime drowsiness

PCOS can lead to fatigue or sleepiness during the day. It is also associated with snoring.

What can I do to reduce long-term health risks?

Have a healthy lifestyle

The main ways to reduce your overall risk of long-term health problems are to:

  • Eat a healthy balanced diet. This should include fruit and vegetables and whole foods (such as wholemeal bread, whole-grain cereals, brown rice and whole-wheat pasta), lean meat, fish and chicken. You should cut down the amount of sugar, salt and caffeine that you eat and drink. You should not drink more alcohol than is recommended (14 units a week for women).

  • Eat meals regularly, especially breakfast

  • Take exercise regularly (30 minutes at least three times a week).

You should aim to keep your weight to a level that is normal. BMI is the measurement of weight in relation to height and you should aim to keep your BMI between 19 and 25. If you are overweight, it would be helpful to lose weight and maintain your weight at this new level.

The benefits of losing weight include:

  • a lower risk of insulin resistance and developing diabetes

  • a lower risk of heart problems

  • a lower risk of cancer of the womb

  • more regular periods

  • an increased chance of becoming pregnant

  • a reduction in acne and a decrease in excess hair growth over time

  • improved mood and self-esteem.

 

You only have to lose a small amount of weight to make a difference to your symptoms and your health.


Have regular health checks

Once you have a diagnosis of PCOS, you will be monitored to check for any early signs of health problems:

  1. Diabetes: Women with PCOS over the age of 40 should be offered a blood sugar test once a year to check for signs of diabetes. If your BMI is 30 or over or you have a family history of diabetes you should be tested for diabetes even earlier.
  2. Cancer of the womb: If you have not had a period for a long time (over 4 months) or have irregular bleeding, it is advisable to see your doctor. You may be offered tests like an ultrasound scan of your womb (uterus) or treatment to make you have a period if they are very irregular.
  3. ​​High blood pressure: Discuss with your doctor how often you should have your blood pressure checked and whether you should have blood tests to check your cholesterol levels.
  4. ​​Depression and psychological problems: You can be referred to a counsellor or trained specialist if necessary.

Are treatments available for women with PCOS?

There is no cure for PCOS. Medical treatments aim to manage and reduce the symptoms or consequences of having PCOS. Medication alone has not been shown to be any better than healthy lifestyle changes (weight loss and exercise).

Many women with PCOS successfully manage their symptoms and long-term health risks without medical intervention. They do this by eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly and maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Treatment is tailored to each woman according to symptoms, other health problems, and whether she wants to become pregnant.

How can combined hormonal birth control pills be used to treat women with PCOS?

Combined hormonal birth control pills can be used for long-term treatment in women with PCOS who do not wish to become pregnant. Combined hormonal pills contain both estrogen and progestin. These birth control pills regulate the menstrual cycle and reduce hirsutism and acne by decreasing androgen levels. They also decrease the risk of endometrial cancer.

How can insulin-sensitizing drugs help treat women with PCOS?

Insulin-sensitizing drugs (eg. Metformin) used to treat diabetes frequently are used in the treatment of PCOS. These drugs help the body respond to insulin. In women with PCOS, they can help decrease androgen levels and improve ovulation. Restoring ovulation helps make menstrual periods regular and more predictable.

Hair removal or slowing hair growth: You can try facial hair removal creams, laser hair removal, or electrolysis to remove excess hair. A prescription skin treatment (eflornithine HCl cream) can slow down the growth rate of new hair in unwanted places.

What can be done to increase the chances of pregnancy for women with PCOS?

Successful ovulation is the first step toward pregnancy. For overweight women, weight loss often accomplishes this goal. Medications also may be used to cause ovulation. Your doctor may prescribe medicine to help you ovulate, such as clomiphene (Clomid).

Surgery on the ovaries has been used when other treatments do not work. The outer shell (called the cortex) of the ovaries is thickened in women with PCOS and thought to play a role in preventing spontaneous ovulation. Ovarian drilling is a surgery in which the doctor makes a few holes in the surface of your ovary using lasers or a fine needle heated with electricity. Surgery usually restores ovulation, but only for six to eight months. 

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4438 people found this helpful