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The Science Of Orgasm - Why Orgasms Feel So Good?

Dr. Yuvraj Arora Monga 90% (1352 ratings)
MD-Pharmacology, MBBS
Sexologist, Delhi  •  20 years experience
The Science Of Orgasm - Why Orgasms Feel So Good?

The mention of the word "orgasm" is enough to numb your senses. It is like a pleasure trip that nobody wants to end. It gives a person an inexplicable eternal feeling, a climax that most couples wait for with bated breath. As known to all, an orgasm is a zenith of a sexual interaction or intercourse. You will seldom come across a person who doesn't enjoy an orgasm. 

Sex without an orgasm can be quite dull and boring. 
Have you ever been intrigued as to why an orgasm feels so good? What is it that makes an orgasm such an enjoyable experience? This article is an attempt to unravel this simple yet important query that has been baffling people for long. 

An orgasm is a way our body reacts physiologically on being sexually aroused. Though the level of excitement and its impact may vary from person to person, most people (both men and women) feel good and euphoric on reaching an orgasm. There is an interesting science behind this. It is important to mention that the brain plays a pivotal role in an orgasm. As in any other organ of the body, there are numerous nerve endings present in the genitalia. These nerve endings are in turn connected to the brain and the spinal cord via the large nerves. 

In this regard, the nerves that are instrumental in sending the signals and the stimulation to the brain (different regions of the brain) on being aroused or excited sexually include 

  1. The Pelvic nerve is responsible for sending signals from the rectum (in both the sexes) and also from the vagina and cervix (women). 
  2. The Hypogastric nerve is responsible for sending signals from the prostate (men) and also from the uterus and the cervix (women).
  3. The Vagus nerve (the longest of the 12 cranial nerve) is only involved in sending the signals from the cervix, uterus, and vagina in women. 
  4. The Pudendal nerve transmits the signals from the scrotum and penis in men. In women, it transmits the signals from the clitoris. 

The signals sent to the brain during an orgasm results in its activation, especially the reward circuits or the pleasure center. The pleasure center is responsible for all kinds of pleasurable feelings in a person. The areas mainly affected by the sexual excitement include 

  1. Amygdala: It is mainly involved in the regulation of emotions like sweating, increased heart rate, and blood pressure. •    Ventral tegmental area (VTA): It is responsible for the release of the neurotransmitter, Dopamine
  2. Nucleus accumbens: The nucleus accumbens is an important part that controls or regulates the release of dopamine. 
  3. Others: Cerebellum (maintains and coordinates the muscular activities in the body) and the Pituitary gland (responsible for the release of vasopressin, oxytocin, and beta-endorphins). 

The arousal, followed by activation, acts as a catalyst which further results in release of neurotransmitters and hormones. The more these neurotransmitters and hormones are released, more pleasure and excitement is experienced during the act. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

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