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Overview

Anti Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (ASCA), IgG Test

Anti Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (ASCA), IgG Test

also known as: ASCA IGG

ASCA are immune proteins that are frequently present in people who have Inflammatory Bowel disease(IBD). The test for anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) is used to help distinguish between Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), the two most common types of Inflammatory bowel disease. Testing usually includes detecting two different classes of ASCA in the blood, IgG and IgA. The person having IBD have symptoms such as Abdominal Pain and Cramps, Diarrhea, Rectal Bleeding, Fever Fatigue. Some person may also develop features such as joint skin, bone and organ related problems. Children faces delayed metabolism and growth of their body.

Antibodies to Saccharomyces cerevisiae are found in approximately 75% patients with Crohn’s disease. There is no pre-preparation required for this test. A blood sample is obtained by inserting a needle into a vein in the arm. When the needle is inserted to draw blood, some people feel moderate pain. Others feel only a prick or stinging. Afterward, there may be some throbbing or slight bruising. This soon goes away.

A positive ASCA result is not diagnostic of CD, UC, or of an IBD, but it does make it more likely that a person with symptoms has an IBD. Results of ASCA testing are often interpreted in conjunction with the results of PANCA Test: If ASCA is positive and PANCA is negative, then it is likely that the person has CD. If ASCA is negative and PANCA is positive, then it is likely that the person has UC. A negative result for ASCA and PANCA does necessarily rule out IBD. A person who is negative may still have CD, UC, or another IBD. The amount of ASCA and PANCA present does not correlate with the severity of a person's symptoms or condition and it cannot be used to monitor response to treatment.

Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) are immune proteins that are frequently present in people who have Inflammatory bowel disease(IBD). This test detects ASCA in the blood. Testing for ASCA can be useful in helping to distinguish between the two most common types of IBD, Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). CD can affect any part of the intestinal tract, from mouth to anus, but is primarily found in the small intestine or in the colon, while UC occurs in the colon. There are two classes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies produced by the body, ASCA IgG and ASCA IgA. Testing usually includes both classes. The method used in laboratory is known as Enzyme Immunoassay.

Specimen
serum
Volume
2ml
Container
6ml red top tube
Type Gender Age-Group Value
ASCA
UNISEX
All age groups
negative
Rs1800- Rs4000

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