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Post Menopausal Osteoporosis Tips

Causes for Osteoporosis

Dr. P Nagaraj 90% (3801 ratings)
FRHS, Ph.D Neuro , MPT - Neurology Physiotherapy, D.Sp.Med, DPHM (Health Management ), BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Chennai

- age

- menopause

- low body mass index

- low bone density

- previous fracture

- cigarette smoking

- alcohol consumption

- family history

- low dietary calcium and vitamin d intake


- prolonged bed rest or physically inactivity

- certain medications like steroids and anti-thyroid drugs

- certain illness like rheumatoid arthritis, hyperthyroidism etc

Know More About Osteoporosis!

Dr. Phani Kiran S 92% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, DNB - Orthopedics
Orthopedist, Chennai
Know More About Osteoporosis!

Are you at high risk of developing a fracture in your spine or hip? read on to know more about osteoporosis.

There is another silently progressing, common disease other than diabetes and hypertension that can cause potentially serious risk to your health in old age. Osteoporosis meaning “porous bones” indicates a condition where your bones become more porous, thinner and weaker due to accelerated loss of bone or reduced bone formation or both. It is most evident in the vertebrae of spine, hip bones and in the wrists.

Thin and porous vertebrae fracture easily. They crumble on their own or due to minor stresses during daily activities like coughing, sneezing, bending forwards. These fractures can be painless and go unnoticed in multiple levels till the spine develops a forward bend and a noticeable loss of height. Or it can cause significant pain and disability, limitation in daily activities and increased dependence on others. A simple slip and fall at home can cause a fracture in the hip bones that can make the patient completely bed ridden. These situations commonly cause depression and general deterioration of health and leads to other risky complications in old age.

Though it is most common women after menopause, it also happens in men above age of 65 years and in those with certain risk factors like liver or kidney disease, thyroid or parathyroid disorders, and certain tumours. Smoking has been proven to cause osteoporosis. Long term steroid intake given for various conditions and medications given for seizure disorders also can cause osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis can be detected easily by a screening test called the dexa scan. Any one above the age of 50 years should consult an orthopaedic surgeon to know if they are at risk of osteoporosis and whether he/she needs a dexa scan. If the dexa scan reveals that you have osteoporosis, you must be evaluated by an orthopaedic surgeon and an endocrinologist to look for other treatable conditions that can cause osteoporosis. There are medications that are prescribed to strengthen the bones and reduce the risk of fractures in future. Diet rich in calcium and vitamin d and supplementary calcium and vitamin d medications are also an essential part of treatment.

Although the vertebral osteoporotic fractures commonly heal in a few weeks with bed rest and medications, some of them may not heal in time or cause severe pain and disability. These patients might need surgical intervention. Vertebroplasty is a procedure that involves injection of bone cement into the broken vertebra and can give immediate pain relief. Kyphoplasty is a similar procedure that can restore the height of the fractured vertebral body and reduce the forward stoop in the spine. Open surgery might be required sometimes if the collapsed vertebra causes a compression of the spinal cord or nerves in the spine. Osteoporotic hip fractures and wrist fractures often need surgical treatment for fixation.

Prevention of osteoporosis should begin in childhood. Growing bones accumulate calcium and the calcium in bones reaches a peak at around age of 26 to 30 years. After that age, there is a slow decline in the bone calcium, which accelerates in old age especially in women after menopause. So those who reach a lower peak of calcium in bones by the age of 30 are at a higher risk of developing osteoporosis in old age. This means that adequate intake of dietary calcium, vitamin d and adequate exercise from young age is very important to prevent osteoporosis.

Prevention of falls and resultant fractures in those who are osteoporotic is an important aspect of treatment. This needs modification of their living spaces to remove the risks of a slip and fall. Routine exercises and an active lifestyle load the bones and make them stronger and it is a must for all those with osteoporosis and those at risk of developing osteoporosis.

2 people found this helpful

Possible Reasons Behind Osteoporosis!

Dr. Deepak Kumar Arora 90% (160 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Delhi
Possible Reasons Behind Osteoporosis!

Your bone is a living tissue that constantly undergoes the cycle of breakage and replacement. Osteoporosis is a condition wherein the rate at which new bones form cannot match up to the worn out bones, thus making the bones fragile. Osteoporosis mainly affects the wrist, hip or spine and can result in a stooped posture accompanied by height shrinkage and back pain caused due to a collapsed vertebra. 

Reasons Behind Osteoporosis Hormones: 
Lowered estrogen level in women and testosterone in men as a result of ageing or other treatments can result in this condition. Excess thyroid secretion in the body, an overactive adrenalin gland or parathyroid gland can also accelerate bone loss. Women are more vulnerable to osteoporosis during menopause

  1. Prolonged use of steroid: Prolonged use of injected or oral steroid medications such as cortisone or prednisone messes with the bone-building process. Medicines used to combat cancer, gastric reflux and seizures can be responsible as well. 
  2. Medical Conditions: Certain medical conditions such as Rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, liver or kidney disease increases the risks of acquiring osteoporosis. 
  3. Sedentary Lifestyle: A sedentary lifestyle with not much physical activity along with an excessive consumption of alcohol and tobacco makes you susceptible to osteoporosis. 

Treatments for Osteoporosis: 

  1. Medication: Commonly prescribed medicines for osteoporosis include vitamin D, Calcium, bisphosphonates such as Zoledronic acid, Ibandronate, Risedronate and Alendronate. However these medicines are not free of side-effects such as abdominal pain, nausea or heart burn. In case, your regular medicine doesn’t work, you can use Denosumab and Teriparatide as alternatives but only after consulting your physician. 
  2. Hormone Therapy: Estrogen therapy for women after menopause helps sustain bone density. However such procedures can escalate the dangers of getting afflicted with cancer, heart diseases or conditions such as blood clotting. 
  3. Alternative Medicine: Ipriflavone, a laboratory manufactured product, when combined with calcium can curb chances of bone loss and alleviate pain

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3515 people found this helpful

How Can Osteoporosis Be Prevented?

Dr. Atul Mishra 86% (16 ratings)
Fellowship In Joint Replacement, MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Delhi
How Can Osteoporosis Be Prevented?

What is Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a disease concerning the bones. Decreased strength of the bones poses a risk for them to break. Osteoporosis is very common among older people, whose bones become brittle with age. The most common bones affected by this disease include the backbone, forearm bones and the hip bone. There are no such symptoms until a broken bone occurs. The bones weaken to such an extent that a break may happen in case of very minor stress. Usually, a broken bone is followed by chronic pain and the disability to perform daily activities. Surveys show that 15% of white people in their 50s and 70% of white people in their 80s are affected by osteoporosis.

What are the common causes and symptoms of osteoporosis?
- May occur due to the lowering of the "peak bone mass index".
- In women, bone loss increases after menopause stage due to lowering down of estrogen level.
- Also occurs because of another disease or previous treatments. This includes alcoholism, surgical ovary removal, hyperthyroidism, anorexia or any form of kidney disorder.
- Anti-seizure medicines, chemotherapy, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and taking of performance-enhancing drugs like steroid increase the bone loss rate.
- Lack of regular exercise may lead to osteoporosis.
- Osteoporosis is defined as a "bone density of 2.5 standard deviations below than that of a young adult".
- Osteoporosis is hereditary in nature. People having a family history of osteoporosis are at a high risk of getting the disease.
- More than thirty genes are linked with osteoporosis development.
- If you have had a fracture before, you are at a risk of a repeat.
- Early menopause in women is also responsible for osteoporosis.
- People with a small structure and body build are at a risk of getting osteoporosis.
- Protein and vitamin deficiency makes your bones weak and makes you vulnerable to osteoporosis.
- Phosphoric acid present in soft drinks is another threat, which may cause the disease.
- People suffering from malnutrition are likely to get osteoporosis.
- Over replacement of L-Thyroxine may lead to osteoporosis.
- Use of heparin and warfarin for a long time decreases the bone density.

How can Osteoporosis be prevented?
The best way to avoid getting osteoporosis in the future is to maintain a preventive lifestyle.
- Exercise regularly.
- Indulge in natural calcium sources.
- Maintain intake of Vitamin D and Vitamin K.
- Do not smoke and consume alcohol.
- Don't undertake stressful physical activities.
- Go for regular health checkups.
- Stay fit and stay away from obesity.

4429 people found this helpful

Who Is At Risk Of Osteoporosis?

Dr. Murali Krishna 89% (108 ratings)
DNB (Orthopedics), MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Visakhapatnam
Who Is At Risk Of Osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis is a condition which usually results due to a decrease in bone density. In this condition, the bones become weak and brittle. Fractures are a common result of osteoporosis. Usually, symptoms or signs do not show up until the condition progresses to its advanced stages.

Since osteoporosis is usually irreversible and incurable, preventing the fractures is considered to be extremely important.

Who is at risk of osteoporosis?
All men and women have some risk of developing 'thinning' of the bones (osteoporosis) as they become older, particularly over the age of 60. As mentioned above, women are more at risk than men. The following situations may also lead to excessive bone loss and so increase your risk of developing osteoporosis. If you:

  1. Are a woman who had the menopause before 45 years of age
  2. Have already had a bone fracture after a minor fall or bump
  3. Have a strong family history of osteoporosis.
  4. Have a body mass index (BMI) of 19 or less (that is, you are very underweight)
  5. Have irregular periods
  6. Have taken, or are taking, a steroid medicine (such as prednisolone) for three months or more
  7. Are a smoker
  8. Have an alcohol intake of more than four units per day
  9. Lack calcium and/or vitamin D (due to a poor diet and/or little exposure to sunlight).
  10. Are mostly inactive

Ways To Treat Osteporosis

Osteoporosis in women can be treated using Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). The therapy makes use of either a combination of progestin and oestrogen or simply, oestrogen. However, it is possible that certain combinations have side-effects that might give rise to other medical conditions. Therefore, proper consultation with an orthopedist is an essential pre-requisite so that the condition of osteoporosis as well the side effects may be addressed before proceeding with Hormone Replacement Therapy.

There are a number of medications that can be used which have long-term effects on osteoporosis. However, the schedule for intake of these medicines should be followed diligently. Failing to adhere to the schedule could lead to serious complications. For example, the intake of Risedronate medications (prevent bone loss) should be scheduled once every month, failing which can cause ulcers in the food pipe. Raloxifene has effects which are similar to oestrogen but does not exhibit any serious side effects. Teriparatide can be used to treat osteoporosis in people who have a high risk of suffering from bone fractures.

Don't rely entirely on medication as the only treatment for your osteoporosis. These practices also are important:

  1. Exercise. Weight-bearing physical activity and exercises that improve balance and posture can strengthen bones and reduce the chance of a fracture. The more active and fit you are as you age, the less likely you are to fall and break a bone.
  2. Good nutrition. Eat a healthy diet and make certain that you're getting enough calcium and vitamin D. Being underweight or losing a lot of weight unintentionally is associated with poorer bone health and a higher risk of fracture — even if you're taking a bisphosphonate.
  3. Quit smoking. Smoking cigarettes speed up bone loss.
  4. Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2658 people found this helpful

Osteoporosis- How To Treat It?

Dr. Romil Rathi 88% (29 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Nagpur
Osteoporosis- How To Treat It?

Osteoporosis is a condition which usually results due to a decrease in bone density. In this condition, the bones become weak and brittle. Fractures are a common result of osteoporosis. Usually, symptoms or signs do not show up until the condition progresses to its advanced stages.

Since osteoporosis is usually irreversible and incurable, preventing the fractures is considered to be extremely important.

Who is at risk of osteoporosis?
All men and women have some risk of developing 'thinning' of the bones (osteoporosis) as they become older, particularly over the age of 60. As mentioned above, women are more at risk than men. The following situations may also lead to excessive bone loss and so increase your risk of developing osteoporosis. If you:

  1. Are a woman who had the menopause before 45 years of age
  2. Have already had a bone fracture after a minor fall or bump
  3. Have a strong family history of osteoporosis.
  4. Have a body mass index (BMI) of 19 or less (that is, you are very underweight)
  5. Have irregular periods
  6. Have taken, or are taking, a steroid medicine (such as prednisolone) for three months or more
  7. Are a smoker
  8. Have an alcohol intake of more than four units per day
  9. Lack calcium and/or vitamin D (due to a poor diet and/or little exposure to sunlight).
  10. Are mostly inactive

Ways To Treat Osteporosis

Osteoporosis in women can be treated using Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). The therapy makes use of either a combination of progestin and oestrogen or simply, oestrogen. However, it is possible that certain combinations have side-effects that might give rise to other medical conditions. Therefore, proper consultation with an orthopedist is an essential pre-requisite so that the condition of osteoporosis as well the side effects may be addressed before proceeding with Hormone Replacement Therapy.

There are a number of medications that can be used which have long-term effects on osteoporosis. However, the schedule for intake of these medicines should be followed diligently. Failing to adhere to the schedule could lead to serious complications. For example, the intake of Risedronate medications (prevent bone loss) should be scheduled once every month, failing which can cause ulcers in the food pipe. Raloxifene has effects which are similar to oestrogen but does not exhibit any serious side effects. Teriparatide can be used to treat osteoporosis in people who have a high risk of suffering from bone fractures.

Don't rely entirely on medication as the only treatment for your osteoporosis. These practices also are important:

  1. Exercise. Weight-bearing physical activity and exercises that improve balance and posture can strengthen bones and reduce the chance of a fracture. The more active and fit you are as you age, the less likely you are to fall and break a bone.
  2. Good nutrition. Eat a healthy diet and make certain that you're getting enough calcium and vitamin D. Being underweight or losing a lot of weight unintentionally is associated with poorer bone health and a higher risk of fracture — even if you're taking a bisphosphonate.
  3. Quit smoking. Smoking cigarettes speed up bone loss.
  4. Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger.

Osteoporosis and Exercises

Dr. Vipsa Gupta 88% (70 ratings)
Fellowship in Neurological Rehabilitation, BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Gurgaon
Osteoporosis and Exercises

Hello Friends,

What is osteoporosis?

The components of the word 'osteoporosis' literally mean 'porous bones' - 'osteo' is for bones, and 'porosis' means porous - helpfully describing this condition that results in reduced bone density and increased fragility of the bones.The thinning of the bones in osteoporosis, combined with the formation of weaker bone crystals, puts people at a higher risk of Fall and  Fractures.

It can affect anyone of any gender, but it is particularly prevalent in postmenopausal women due to the sudden decrease in protective oestrogen levels after menopause.

Signs and Symtom

Bone loss that develops slowly, leading to osteoporosis, does not cause any symptoms or outward signs.

As such, a patient may only discover that they have osteoporosis due to an unexpected fracture after a minor fall or a slip or strain - or even a simple cough or sneeze - may result in a fracture.Breaks in the spine can lead to altered posture, with compressed vertebrae creating the stooped appearance often seen in older people

Diagnosis

  • Osteoporosis may be diagnosed directly through the use of a bone scan that measures bone mineral density (BMD). Central or peripheral DXA.
  • Osteoporosis is diagnosed when the T-score is -2.5 or below.
  • Other methods of measuring bone density include x-ray, ultrasound, and CT scan

Treatment

It is important to ensure the cause of low bone denisty has been properly diagnosed as the treatment will vary greatly.the decision about what treatment you need – if any – will also be based on a number of other factors. These include your:

  • age
  • sex
  • risk of fracture
  • previous injury history

Treating osteoporosis involves treating and preventing fractures and using medication to strengthen bones.

How Can a Physical Therapist Help?

Your physical therapist can develop a specific program based on your individual needs to help improve your overall bone health, keep your bones healthy, and help you avoid fracture. Your physical therapist may teach you.

  • Specific exercises : to build bone or decrease the amount of bone loss
  • Proper posture
  • How to improve your balance so as to reduce your risk of falling
  • How to adjust your environment to protect your bone health

 Typically, exercises are performed 2 to 3 times a week as part of an overall fitness program.Your exercise routine should include exercises in each of the following areas:

  • Strengthening exercise
  • postural exercise
  • balance exercise
  • weight-bearing
  • Flexibility exercise

1) Strength training

Strength training is a type of exercise with the goal of improving muscular strength. It involves performing movements against resistance; it is sometimes referred to as resistance training. Exercise bands, weights, machines or even your own body weight can be used for resistance. Strength training may increase spine and hip bone mineral density.

2) Posture training

Posture training involves paying attention to how the parts of our body are aligned with each other. Some kyphosis, or curvature of the upper back, is normal, but fractures or weak back extensor muscles can cause the spine to curve more than usual, resulting in an exaggerated kyphosis or excessively curved upper back.Attention to alignment during activity and at rest, along with exercises targeting the back extensor muscles, can improve the alignment of the spine. Flexion exercises are often CONTRAINDICATED. .

3) Balance training

Balance training exercises are those that challenge your balance.Balance exercises are also important to incorporate to further reduce the risk of falls Examples include:Shifting weight to the limits of support (e.g., moving your weight more to one foot than another).

Physical activities like Tai Chi, that involve balance and coordination may also reduce falls and fractures.

Tai Chi is a very safe and effective low impact form of exercise that improves balance and reduces the risk of falls.

4) Weight bearing Aerobic (water) physical activity

Aerobic exercise  is a rhythmic activity that you do for at least 10 minutes at a time continuously and it increases your heart rate and makes you breathe harder than you usually do during your daily activities.For individuals with osteoporosis, we often recommend weight-bearing aerobic exercise or physical activity like walking or cycling or swiming or guided exercises to be done in swimmimng pool

5 flexibility exercise:

These can help improve the individuals overall physical function and postural control

Start by speaking with a physical therapist or consult me to ensure you are choosing safe , specific  and appropriate physical activities for you.
Remember: if you have osteoporosis, aerobic exercise is not enough. Strength training and balance training are essential to maintain bone and muscle, and prevent falls.

 

"Osteoporosis is not a inevitable part of aging it is preventable.So it is vital that all of us,start taking care of our bones now, before its too late"..quote by Camila Parler Bowles

Thanks

17 people found this helpful

Osteoporosis - How Can It Be Detected?

Dr. Chirag Chudasama 85% (10 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics, Fellow In arthroscopy
Orthopedist, Ahmedabad
Osteoporosis - How Can It Be Detected?

Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become fragile, hence increasing one’s susceptibility to fracture. The term means “porous bone.” When closely monitored under a microscope, a healthy bone looks like a honeycomb but at the time of osteoporosis, the holes and spaces are lot larger than what they are in healthy bones. Bones tend to lose density and contain abnormal tissue structure. Due to these reasons, bones become weak and hence are more likely to break.

How serious is the problem?

  • For older patients, breaking a bone leads to serious complication of osteoporosis. The bone breaks are most likely to occur in the spine, wrist or hip but there is possibility for other bones to break too. In addition to the pain which a patient suffers because of the problem, it also causes people to lose height.
  • Height loss happens primarily because of the fact that osteoporosis affects vertebrae or the bones of the spine, which leads to a stooped posture. This problem can make a person immobile to some extent, hence make him or her feel isolated and depressed.
  • Close to 20% of aged people, who break a hip, expire within one year either through developing complications related to the broken bone or out of surgery to repair the damage. A long-term nursing home care is advised for coming out of the after-effects completely.

Ways to detect the beginning of osteoporosis

At an early stage, this problem of osteoporosis doesn’t cause any symptoms or give out any warning signal. In majority of the cases, people suffering from osteoporosis will not be aware of the fact that they are going through the condition till they have a fracture. In case, if symptoms do tend to appear, some of the initial ones might include:

  • Grip strength becoming weak
  • Nails are turning out to be brittle and thus easily breaking off
  • Recession of gums.

Causes Of Osteoporosis

Let’s take a look at some of the causes due to which people might suffer from osteoporosis:

  • Age: The most pertinent cause of osteoporosis is age. Throughout the lifetime, our bodies break down old bones and grow new ones but when someone is in his or her 30s, then the body starts to break up faster than usual and hence replacement of bones takes time.
  • Medical Conditions: Some medical conditions like hyperthyroidism can also be one of the causes of Osteoporosis. Medications like long-term oral or injected corticosteroids such as prednisone or cortisone can also result in people developing joint problem in the form of osteoporosis.
  • Menopause: One of the primary reasons behind osteoporosis among women, aged around 45 to 55 years, is menopause. As hormonal change is associated with this, menopause can lead women to lose bones quickly. TreatmentThere is no cure for osteoporosis. Doctors can prescribe patients to change their lifestyle by increasing their intake of calcium and Vitamin D and do exercises regularly to stay fit. Abiding by doctor’s advice, these would ensure slow breakdown of bones.
2441 people found this helpful

Osteoporosis - Factors That Can Lead To It!

Dr. Bharat Singh 91% (34 ratings)
MBBS, MD-Medicine, DM - Clinical Immunology
Rheumatologist, Jaipur
Osteoporosis - Factors That Can Lead To It!

Osteoporosis in very simple terms is a condition that causes spongy bones. The bones develop pores and become fragile with an increased susceptibility to fractures. In average, all our bones get weak after the age of 35 years which means that the bone mass decreases. Women after menopause are especially susceptible to this condition and also osteoporotic fractures. What are the other risk factors for osteoporosis? Knowing this is important for your bone health as it will help to prevent fractures. But before we discuss the causes of osteoporosis, it’ is important to point out that osteoporosis has no symptoms and it can only be diagnosed when you have a fracture for no reason at all, or you get a bone density test to diagnose osteoporosis.

Some of the factors that can lead to osteoporosis are:

  • Genetics
  • Lack of exercise
  • Low calcium and low vitamin D levels
  • A personal history of fracture as an adult
  • Smoking
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Low body weight
  • Family history of osteoporosis which means having a mother with an osteoporotic hip fracture doubles your risk of a hip fracture as well
  • Chemotherapy for treating cancer also increases the risk for osteoporosis as it causes early menopause.
  • In men low testosterone levels known as hypogonadism can cause this condition.
  • The absence of menstrual periods known as amenorrhea in younger women also predisposes them to osteoporosis as it causes low estrogen levels. Amenorrhea can occur in women who undergo extremely vigorous physical training or those that practice extreme dieting. As their body fat goes down they experience amenorrhoea.
  • Chronic inflammation, due to chronic inflammatory arthritis and also liver disease can cause osteoporosis.
  • Any condition that interferes with walking such as stroke can cause spongy bones.
  • Hyperthyroidism, a condition that causes an increase in production of the thyroid hormone can cause spongy bones too.

Some other factors that can lead to it

  • Hyperparathyroidism a disease where there is an increased parathyroid hormone production by the parathyroid gland. This hormone maintains blood calcium levels by absorbing calcium from the bones. This can cause osteoporosis.
  • Low vitamin D causes low absorption of calcium from diet and hence you are at a risk of developing osteoporosis. Conditions such as celiac sprue or biliary cirrhosis which hamper the absorption of vitamin D can also cause osteoporosis.
  • Medications such as heparin, a blood thinner, anti-seizure medicines such as Dilantin and phenobarbital, and long-term use of oral corticosteroids- can all up osteoporosis risks.

The diagnosis of osteoporosis is simple and it is advisable that older people especially women get periodic X- rays and bone density tests to rule out this bone condition.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4173 people found this helpful

4 Reasons Behind Osteoporosis And Its Treatment

Dr. Jyoti Prakash 86% (31 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Kolkata
4 Reasons Behind Osteoporosis And Its Treatment

Your bone is a living tissue that constantly undergoes the cycle of breakage and replacement. Osteoporosis is a condition wherein the rate at which new bones form cannot match up to the worn out bones, thus making the bones fragile and brittle. Osteoporosis mainly affects the wrist, hip or spine and can result in a stooped posture accompanied by height shrinkage and back pain caused due to a collapsed vertebra.

Reasons Behind Osteoporosis

  1. Hormones: Lowered estrogen count in women and testosterone in men as a result of ageing or other treatments can result in this condition. Excess thyroid secretion in the body, an overactive adrenalin gland or parathyroid gland can also accelerate bone loss. Women are more vulnerable to osteoporosis during menopause.

  2. Prolonged use of injected: Prolonged use of injected or oral corticosteroid medications such as cortisone or prednisone messes with the bone-building process. Medicines used to combat cancer, gastric reflux and seizures can be responsible as well.

  3. Medical Conditions: Certain medical conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, liver or kidney disease increases the risks of acquiring osteoporosis.

  4. Sedentary Lifestyle: A sedentary lifestyle with not much physical activity along with an excessive consumption of alcohol and tobacco makes you susceptible to osteoporosis.

Treatments for Osteoporosis:

  1. Medication: Commonly prescribed medicines for remedying fractures include bisphosphonates such as Zoledronic acid, Ibandronate, Risedronate and Alendronate.However these medicines are not free of side-effects such as abdominal pain, nausea or heartburn. In case, your regular medicine doesn’t work, you can use Denosumab and Teriparatide as alternatives but only after consulting your physician.
  2. Hormone Therapy: Estrogen therapy for women after menopause helps sustain bone density. However such procedures can escalate the dangers of getting afflicted with cancer, heart diseases or conditions such as blood clotting.
  3. Alternative Medicine: Ipriflavone, a laboratory manufactured product, when combined with calcium can curb chances of bone loss and alleviate pain. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2313 people found this helpful
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