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Occupational Therapy Health Feed

What Is The Role Of Occupational Therapy In Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Dr. Iram Parveen 90% (669 ratings)
Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT), Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (BOT)
Occupational Therapist, Delhi
What Is The Role Of Occupational Therapy In Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Lifestyle Diseases have been on the rise and to manage these conditions, a combination of medications and therapies become essential.

Occupational Therapy focuses on the way of living rather on medicines to enable the people to lead a life they want to. It is more of a rehabilitation program or therapy to make the patients of rheumatoid arthritis more adaptable to the life changes and to perform their activities on their own.

What is included in occupational therapy?
Occupational therapy involves self-care procedures in which the patient is treated and trained to learn to do things by themselves like using the washroom, eating, and dressing up, etc. People with rheumatoid arthritis tend to lose balance and have less control over their movements and OT helps in rebuilding that strength required for performing the daily activities.

It also involves leisure time for the patients, and it allows them to choose how they want to spend their free time. An occupational therapist helps them understand their interests and to grow that interest as well.
In rheumatoid arthritis, doing some work is necessary to keep your bones and the joints active so that they don’t swell up or get inflamed which is common with this disease. Moreover, OT involves both physical and mental work to keep you active throughout the day.

Besides helping the patient to achieve physical stability, OT helps them to gain mental strength as well. There are sessions which assist them to determine their life goals and things they want to do in their life. Life's hard with rheumatoid arthritis, but with proper occupational therapy and Physical therapy combined, it can become much easier.

OT also involves different changes or interventions to perform and achieve the life goals of the person.

The Essential Role of an Occupational Therapist
The role of an occupational therapist is vital for the patient who has rheumatoid arthritis. As mentioned above that OT involves nothing but doing all the daily life activities which a person is afraid to do because of the joint and bone disorder in rheumatoid arthritis, the occupational therapist help them perform this action more scientifically. They can examine the household of the patient and make necessary changes like replacing small door knobs/handles/levers with the larger ones, small switches with the bigger ones. They can also rearrange the kitchen items to make it easier for the patients to use them and also suggesting the patients to use comfortable chairs or bedding to reduce pain and other symptoms.

The therapist keeps an eye on every change or improvement of the patient and makes necessary adjustments and intervention in the activities to achieve the life goal as soon as possible.

Occupational therapy is highly based on evidence from the past, and it is deeply rooted to the basics of scientific management of rheumatoid arthritis. A time-tested and approved therapy, Occupational therapy makes the life of an RA patient less-painful. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can ask a free question.

4957 people found this helpful

Fine Motor Skills - How Occupational Therapy Can Help Improve Them?

Dr. Iram Parveen 90% (669 ratings)
Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT), Bachelor of Occupational Therapy (BOT)
Occupational Therapist, Delhi
Fine Motor Skills - How Occupational Therapy Can Help Improve Them?

What are fine motor skills?
Motor skills are movements and actions carried out by the proper coordination of the brain, nervous system, and muscles working together. These motions are divided into two types – fine motor skills and gross motor skills. Acquiring and mastering motor skills or control helps you explore the world around you and also helps with your cognitive development.

  • Gross motor skills: They are the movements and actions of the larger groups of muscles of the arms, legs and other body parts to see visible actions like running, swimming, crawling etc
  • Fine motor skills or dexterity: They are the movements and actions of the larger groups of muscles of the wrists, hands, fingers, and the feet and toes to see visible actions like picking up objects between the thumb and finger, writing, etc

Fine motor skills will keep developing with your age, practice and the increased use of muscles. This happens while you are playing sports or playing an instrument. Activities like writing, coloring and using the computer also help in acquiring and mastering them.

Reasons behind fine motor skill issues
As all motor skills require proper coordination of the brain, nervous system, muscles, joints along with good eyesight; issues with any of them can have an effect on dexterity and decrease control. Some common causes affecting the fine motor skills are…

  1. StrokeThe frontal lobe controls your movement, and the cerebellum “fine-tunes” them. As the cerebellum controls fine motor movement, balance, and the brain's ability to determine limb position, a stroke in the cerebellum leads to paralysis or "jerky" muscle movements.
  2. Dyspraxia or DCD: This condition affects co-ordination of gross motor skills requiring balance, kicking and throwing a ball and fine motor skills too such as writing or using small objects carefully in children and adults.

Apart from stroke or DCD any major injury, illness, congenital deformities, cerebral palsy, and developmental disabilities can hamper the fine motor skills development too.

Occupational therapy for improving fine motor skills
All fine motor skills are imperative for your own self-care and maintaining self-dependence for the different activates carried out throughout your life, any dexterity issues can severely bring down your self-esteem and quality of life. Occupational therapy can help improve overall fine motor skills. It involves the use of particular activities as an aid to recuperation from physical or mental illness. An Occupational therapist can practice in different settings, like: hospitals, long-term care facilities, schools, outpatient clinics, and the assisted living communities too.

So, depending on how soon the fine motor skill issues are diagnosed and their severity one can approach the Occupational therapist for their improvement. He or she would then follow an assessment process allowing them to identify the nature of your difficulties with fine motor skills, and the reasons for them. Once identified, they work with you to put in place a plan to address them. Depending on each individual case the therapy would involve a practice of different movements on a regular basis to help you improve and master the fine motor skills.

4973 people found this helpful

ADHD - Know The Symptoms

Dr. Shyam Behari Sharma 87% (164 ratings)
MBBS, MS - General Surgery, MCh - Pediatric Surgery
Pediatric Surgeon, Jaipur
ADHD - Know The Symptoms

If you have noticed your child to be restless and anxious all the time, it might look cute as the child is highly energetic, but it could be a cause for concern at the same time. It is not normal and the child could be having ADHD that is attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. As the name suggests, it is a disorder with deficiency of attention and in which the child is always hyperactive.

ADHD is a disorder in which the symptoms usually show up before the age of seven. It is characterized by a group of behavioral symptoms that include inattentiveness, hyperactivity and impulsiveness. The impact of these symptoms is felt extensively where his overall self-esteem is affected, be it at home, preschool or school, academics or extracurricular activities and in interpersonal relationships.

The most common symptoms, which are almost diagnostic of ADHD are:

  1. Inability to hold attention: The child's attention span is very short and it is very difficult to keep them engaged on one particular thing.
  2. Increased restlessness: The child would be extremely restless and gets distracted easily.
  3. Fidgeting: The child would be seen constantly fidgeting with his fingers.

The following are the less common ones:

  1. Learning disability is rare, but can happen. However, the good news is that it does not affect the child's intelligence.
  2. Sleep disorders
  3. Difficulty in following directions
  4. Poor executive functioning skills
  5. Disorganization, which can lead to poor motor coordination and impaired movements
  6. ADHD kids tend to forget things very easily and need help with coordinating movements
  7. The child suffering from ADHD could easily tire and/or feel lethargic with very low energy levels. This can lead to the child procrastinating things and not wanting to do things on priority basis
  8. These children also have difficulties with fine motor and cognitive skills and so there is delay in their overall participation in games.

While these are the pressing symptoms of ADHD, occupational therapy can play a significant role in managing the child in the following ways. As a first step, the caregiver should have a detailed discussion with the school staff and any other people with whom the child interacts significantly.

This will help identify areas that need support from an Occupational Therapy, which are the following:

  1. Support with gross and/or fine motor skills
  2. Support with improving handwriting
  3. Support with engaging in playing sports and games
  4. Support in engaging in social activities
  5. Improving sensory processing difficulties
  6. Improving visual perception
  7. Support in adapting to the environment
  8. Teaching strategies to participate in various social and academic activities

So, while an ADHD child is definitely a cause for concern, proper support from family can help manage the condition. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a pediatrician.

1898 people found this helpful

How Can Muscular Dystrophy Be Treated in Children?

Dr. Sanjeev Kumar 88% (420 ratings)
MD - Paediatrics, MBBS
Pediatrician, Faridabad
How Can Muscular Dystrophy Be Treated in Children?

Weakness of the muscles due to a genetically inherited condition is known as muscular dystrophy. This condition prevents the body from producing the required protein that can help in building muscles. This protein is also responsible for making the muscles strong and stable. This is most commonly seen in children who may seem clumsy as they begin to grow up and indulge in varied kinds of movements. Let us learn more about this condition and the ways in which it may be treated.

  1. Symptoms: In order to better understand the ways of treating this condition, it is important to take stock of the varied signs and symptoms that are associated with the same. The main symptom of this condition includes difficulty in walking as well as constant slips and falls that may be endured by the child. Also, the children suffering from this condition will have trouble in lifting the leg and foot in a normal way.
  2. Other Complications: This condition can also affect the heart and lungs by making the muscles in these regions weak. Also, this condition can lead to a number of serious breathing problems that will need immediate medical intervention so that it does not become fatal. It may also lead to accelerated heart beats and affect the hands and feet of the patient in an adverse manner. This condition can be found in different types, each of which will affect the patient in a different manner.
  3. Physical and Occupational Therapy: One of the most effective ways of dealing with condition in the long run is to indulge in physical and occupational therapy. With the help of a physiotherapist and other specialists, the patient will be taught to move in a more deliberate and normal manner without falling too often. Also, the patient will be eventually trained to go about life and various functions with certain kinds of movements that will be limited to the issues that the patient may be facing. Bracing will also be required so as to help the child cope better in the physical sense.
  4. Prednisone: This medicine may be prescribed by the Pediatrician to ensure that the progression of the heart issues may be slowed down. This will ensure that the heart may function in a more normal manner despite the muscle issues that it may be facing. The doctor will usually recommend that the medicine should be started when the child is around five or six years old.
  5. Spinal Fusion: This surgery can lessen the pain and reduce the severity of the symptoms, which can lead to better chances of moving in a normal manner. This will also give the child better posture so that the child may breathe normally.
4545 people found this helpful