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Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Tips

Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy - Know Merits Of It!

Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy - Know Merits Of It!

Surgeons perform the Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Procedure when there is an obstruction to the flow of bile from the gallbladder to the digestive system. This may happen due to the formation of stones in the gallbladder.

In case there is a stone in the gallbladder, it calls for the removal of the gallbladder. If the gallbladder is not removed, it may give rise to abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, pain in the shoulder, arms, etc. It may also lead to jaundice and infection and put the pancreas in difficulty. The gallbladder removal procedure can be carried out through the Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy.

In this procedure, the gallbladder is removed from the abdomen through key holes using a laparoscope and other surgical instruments. A total of 4 key holes are made into the abdomen.

Role of Gallbladder and Why Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy is Needed?

The gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ located at the right side of the liver. It helps the digestive system of the body. The gallbladder stores the bile juice made by the liver. This bile juice helps in digesting the fat. If there are stones in the gallbladder, it can block the flow of bile fluid, which affects the functionality of the digestive system. This problem is known as Gallstones. A Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy is performed when there is a stone in the gallbladder.

What Is a Laparoscope and How Is It Used?

A laparoscope is a narrow tube-like structure that carries a camera in front of it. This instrument is inserted through a small incision and the doctor manipulates it to view the targeted area clearly. He can view the area clearly on the monitor. Surgical instruments are then inserted through other incisions, and the gallbladder is removed.

The Procedure:

Before the procedure, the patient is administered with general anesthesia. This relaxes the muscles and prevents pain. The patient falls asleep and the doctor carries out the procedure. Carbon dioxide is inserted into the abdomen to inflate it. 

What Are the Benefits of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Procedure?

There are many benefits of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy over open gallbladder removal:

  1. The patient has less discomfort compared to regular surgery.

  2. The patient also needs to stay in the hospital for a lesser number of days as compared to open surgery.

  3. The patient also has small key holes as compared to big incision open surgeries.

Risks of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy:

The risk of complications is low in a laparoscopic procedure. However, there are still some risks, that include:

  1. Infection

  2. Injury to the common bile duct

  3. Shoulder Pain

  4. Leakage of Bile

  5. Injury to intestine

  6. Incisional hernia

Conclusion:

Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become a popular option for patients having from gallbladder stone. Surgeons often suggest this procedure so that patients can recover quickly and there is minimal bleeding. However, the laparoscopic surgeon must be experienced to perform this type of surgery. An experienced laparoscopic surgeon can ensure that there are minimal bleeding and little risk of other side effects during the procedure. The patient must be able to recover quickly and get back to his routine.

Gallbladder Surgery - What to Expect ?

Gallbladder Surgery - What to Expect ?

Surgery using a laparoscope is the most common way to remove the gallbladder. A laparoscope is a thin, lighted tube that lets the doctor see inside our belly. It is a minimally invasive surgery in which small incisions and specialized tools are used to remove a diseased or infected gallbladder.

The gall bladder is a small organ that sits right under the liver and is credited with bile storage, which can help the body in breaking down various kinds of fats that enter it. So, what all do you need to know about this operation? Read this list.

Reasons for Gall Bladder Operation: The gall bladder is not a very efficient organ. It can lead to blockages and choking as the bile it stores can become very thick and difficult to handle. Also, this bile can start to harbour deposits that are hard ball like substances, usually known as gall bladder stones. The size of these stones can vary from the size of a grain to the size of a golf ball. 

Further, these gall bladder stones can cause infections which can lead to symptoms like nausea, vomiting, bloating and more. Another reason can also be the gall bladder disease known as chloelithiasis, which can cause abdominal pain. Inflammation in the pancreas, also known as pancreatitis, can lead to gall bladder open removal surgery.

Risk: While the gall bladder removal surgery is usually considered a safe one, with little or no complications, there are risks attached to this surgery too. These include sudden and excessive bleeding and the creation of blood clots, allergic reactions to the drugs used as well as anaesthesia, blood vessel damage, accelerated heart rate which leads to an increased risk of contracting a heart attack or heart disease, infections, inflammation or swelling in the pancreas, and injuries caused to the bile duct during surgery.

You might also need this type of surgery if you have the following:

1. biliary dyskinesia, which occurs when the gallbladder doesn't fill or empty correctly due to a defect
2. choledocholithiasis, which occurs when gallstones move to the bile duct and potentially cause a blockage that prevents the gallbladder from draining
3. cholecystitis, which is an inflammation of the gallbladder
4. pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas

Laparoscopic surgery is preferred over open cholecystectomy surgery because the smaller incisions that are made reduce your risk of infection, bleeding, and recovery time.

Preparation: To prepare for your gall bladder removal surgery, the doctor may ask you to have a prescription fluid so that your bowels are flushed clean. You may also be asked to fast for at least six hours before the surgery so that there is no hindrance to the same. Also, the use of an antibacterial soap to bathe is usually prescribed so that the risk of contracting infections decreases.

While this surgery can be a simple one, you will have to take due care after the surgery to ensure that the recovery is fast and virtually pain free.

Laparoscopy - How Does It Benefit In Gallstone Surgery?

Laparoscopy - How Does It Benefit In Gallstone Surgery?

Gallstones are a medical condition in which stones develop in the bile duct or the gallbladder. Most gallstones are a combination of cholesterol, calcium, and bile salts/bile pigments. One of the factors responsible for the formation of gallstones is an elevated excretion of cholesterol by the liver, most of which remains undissolved by the bile. The undissolved cholesterol may crystallize resulting in the formation of gallstones (yellow cholesterol stones, a condition termed as Cholesterol Gallstones).

In some cases, increased level of bilirubin in the bile (triggered by a liver problem, liver damage or other medical conditions), which doesn't undergo a breakdown, may lead to stone formation (known as Pigment Gallstones). Here, the stones appear black or dark brown in color.

Gallstones are more common among women than men, especially those who are 40 years and more. Obesity, diabetes, liver disorders, unhealthy diet (rich in fats and cholesterol), certain medications (those containing estrogen) can also trigger the formation of gallstones. There is a strong genetic and racial predisposition towards gallstone developement in Indians. Gallstones left untreated and unattended can give rise to serious complications such as blockage of the pancreatic duct (resulting in Pancreatitis) or the bile duct.

Stone slippage into the bile duct may lead to obstructive jaundice.There may also be inflammation of the gallbladder. Gallstones are one of the most common risk factor for the development of gall bladder cancer Laparoscopy to remove the gallstones There is no treatment option available for gallstone disease other than the surgical removal of gallbladder, also called cholecystectomy. This surgery may be done by open or laparoscopic method.

What makes laparoscopic surgery superior to open surgery is that it is minimally invasive with a better and quick recovery. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy involved the following steps. General anesthesia is given to the patients before the surgery. The surgeon makes 3-4 small incisions in the abdomen.

In the next step, the surgeon carefully inserts a laparoscope (a narrow and long tube that comes with a high-density light and a front camera with a high-resolution) through one of the incisions (usually the one close to the belly button) to aid in the surgery.

Next, the surgeon inserts the surgical instruments needed to get the gallbladder along with the gallstones, removed. Before the surgical removal of the gallstones and the gallbladder, an important X-ray of the bile duct called the Intraoperative Cholangiography (shows the bile duct anatomy) may be done, if it is suspected that stones have slipped into the bile duct.

Once the gallbladder with the stones is removed from the body, the laparoscope and the surgical instruments are then removed and the incisions stitched carefully. The gallbladder is known to store the bile pigment. With the removal of the gallbladder, there is a small rearrangement.

The bile duct may dilate slightly, taking over some of this storage function of the gallbladder. By and large to removal of a diseased gallbladder containing stones does not affect the digestive functioning of the body. The patients may require to stay 1-2 days in the hospital. The patient is expected to be in a better shape (less discomfort, less pain, better cosmetic results) after laparoscopy than open surgery.

Gall Bladder Surgery - What Are The Risks Of It?

Gall Bladder Surgery - What Are The Risks Of It?

Surgery using a laparoscope is the most common way to remove the gallbladder. A laparoscope is a thin, lighted tube that lets the doctor see inside our belly. It is a minimally invasive surgery in which small incisions and specialized tools are used to remove a diseased or infected gallbladder.

The gall bladder is a small organ that sits right under the liver and is credited with bile storage, which can help the body in breaking down various kinds of fats that enter it. So, what all do you need to know about this operation? Read this list.

Reasons for Gall Bladder Operation: The gall bladder is not a very efficient organ. It can lead to blockages and choking as the bile it stores can become very thick and difficult to handle. Also, this bile can start to harbour deposits that are hardball like substances, usually known as gall bladder stones. The size of these stones can vary from the size of a grain to the size of a golf ball. 

Further, these gall bladder stones can cause infections which can lead to symptoms like nausea, vomiting, bloating and more. Another reason can also be the gall bladder disease known as cholelithiasis, which can cause abdominal pain. Inflammation in the pancreas, also known as pancreatitis, can lead to gall bladder open removal surgery.

Risk: While the gall bladder removal surgery is usually considered a safe one, with little or no complications, there are risks attached to this surgery too. These include sudden and excessive bleeding and the creation of blood clots, allergic reactions to the drugs used as well as anaesthesia, blood vessel damage, accelerated heart rate which leads to an increased risk of contracting a heart attack or heart disease, infections, inflammation or swelling in the pancreas, and injuries caused to the bile duct during surgery.

You might also need this type of surgery if you have the following:

1. Biliary dyskinesia, which occurs when the gallbladder doesn't fill or empty correctly due to a defect
2. Choledocholithiasis, which occurs when gallstones move to the bile duct and potentially cause a blockage that prevents the gallbladder from draining
3. Cholecystitis, which is an inflammation of the gallbladder
4. Pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas

Laparoscopic surgery is preferred over open cholecystectomy surgery because the smaller incisions that are made reduce your risk of infection, bleeding, and recovery time.

Preparation: To prepare for your gall bladder removal surgery, the doctor may ask you to have a prescription fluid so that your bowels are flushed clean. You may also be asked to fast for at least six hours before the surgery so that there is no hindrance to the same. Also, the use of antibacterial soap to bathe is usually prescribed so that the risk of contracting infections decreases.

While this surgery can be a simple one, you will have to take due care after the surgery to ensure that the recovery is fast and virtually pain-free.

What Is Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy?

What Is Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy?

Gallbladder removal is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures. Gallbladder removal surgery is usually performed with minimally invasive techniques and the medical name for this procedure is Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy or Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal.

The gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that rests beneath the right side of the liver. Its main purpose is to collect and concentrate a digestive liquid (bile) produced by the liver. Bile is released from the gallbladder after eating, aiding digestion. Bile travels through narrow tubular channels (bile ducts) into the small intestine. Removal of the gallbladder is not associated with any impairment of digestion in most people.

What Causes Gallbladder Problems?

Gallbladder problems are usually caused by the presence of gallstones which are usually small and hard, consisting primarily of cholesterol and bile salts that form in the gallbladder or in the bile duct.

It is uncertain why some people form gallstones but risk factors include being female, prior pregnancy, age over 40 years and being overweight. Gallstones are also more common as you get older and some people may have a family history of gallstones. There are no known means to prevent gallstones.

These stones may block the flow of bile out of the gallbladder, causing it to swell and resulting in sharp abdominal pain, vomiting, indigestion and, occasionally, fever. If the gallstone blocks the common bile duct, jaundice (yellowing of the skin) can occur.

Diagnosing:

1. Ultrasound is most commonly used to find gallstones.

2. In a few more complex cases, other X-ray tests such as a CT scan or a gallbladder nuclear medicine scan may be used to evaluate gallbladder disease.

Gallstones do not go away on their own. Some can be temporarily managed by making dietary adjustments, such as reducing fat intake. This treatment has a low, short-term success rate. Symptoms will eventually continue unless the gallbladder is removed. Treatments to break up or dissolve gallstones are largely unsuccessful.

Surgical removal of the gallbladder is the time-honoured and safest treatment of gallbladder disease.

What are the Advantages of Performing Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal?

1. Rather than a five to seven-inch incision, the operation requires only four small openings in the abdomen.

2. Patients usually have minimal post-operative pain.

3. Patients usually experience a faster recovery than open gallbladder surgery patients.

4. Most patients go home the same day of the surgery and enjoy a quicker return to normal activities.

TIPS FOR HEALTHY GALL BLADDER:

Lifestyle changes in a patient having gallstone-

• Maintain a healthy weight

• Avoid rapid weight loss

• Eat anti-inflammatory diet (Bell pepper, citrus fruits, green leafy vegetables, tomatoes, milk, fish, beans, nuts, lentils)

• Regular exercise

• Supplements – Vitamin C, Iron, Lecthin

Foods to avoid to reduce risk of gallstone:

• Avoid high fat, greasy and fried foods

• Add fiber to your diet

• Avoid caffeinated drink, high-fat dairy produce and very sweet food

• Eat several small meals per day

• Drink sufficient amount of water (8-10 glasses /day)

After gall bladder removal one may experience loose or watery stools. Removing the gall bladder involves rerouting the bile from the liver to small intestine. Bile no longer goes through the gall bladder and it becomes less concentrated. The result is a laxative effect that causes diarrhea. To treat this, a diet low in fat and high in fiber should be taken.

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Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal Surgery - All You Should Be Knowing!

Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal Surgery - All You Should Be Knowing!

What is Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal Surgery (Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy)?

Gallbladder removal is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures. Gallbladder removal surgery is usually performed with minimally invasive techniques and the medical name for this procedure is Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy or Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal.

The gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that rests beneath the right side of the liver. Its main purpose is to collect and concentrate a digestive liquid (bile) produced by the liver. Bile is released from the gallbladder after eating, aiding digestion. Bile travels through narrow tubular channels (bile ducts) into the small intestine. Removal of the gallbladder is not associated with any impairment of digestion in most people.

What Causes Gallbladder Problems?

Gallbladder problems are usually caused by the presence of gallstones which are usually small and hard, consisting primarily of cholesterol and bile salts that form in the gallbladder or in the bile duct.

It is uncertain why some people form gallstones but risk factors include being female, prior pregnancy, age over 40 years and being overweight. Gallstones are also more common as you get older and some people may have a family history of gallstones. There is no known means to prevent gallstones.

These stones may block the flow of bile out of the gallbladder, causing it to swell and resulting in sharp abdominal painvomitingindigestion and, occasionally, fever. If the gallstone blocks the common bile duct, jaundice (a yellowing of the skin) can occur.

Diagnosing 

  1. Ultrasound is most commonly used to find gallstones.
  2. In a few more complex cases, other X-ray test such as a CT scan or a gallbladder nuclear medicine scan may be used to evaluate gallbladder disease.

Gallstones do not go away on their own. Some can be temporarily managed by making dietary adjustments, such as reducing fat intake. This treatment has a low, short-term success rate. Symptoms will eventually continue unless the gallbladder is removed. Treatments to break up or dissolve gallstones are largely unsuccessful.

Surgical removal of the gallbladder is the time-honored and safest treatment of gallbladder disease.

What are the Advantages of Performing Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal?

  1. Rather than a five to seven inch incision, the operation requires only four small openings in the abdomen.
  2. Patients usually have minimal post-operative pain.
  3. Patients usually experience faster recovery than open gallbladder surgery patients.
  4. Most patients go home the same day of the surgery and enjoy a quicker return to normal activities.

Are you a Candidate?

Although there are many advantages to laparoscopic gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy), the procedure may not be appropriate for some patients who have severe complicated gallbladder disease or previous upper abdominal surgery. A thorough medical evaluation by your personal physician, in consultation with a surgeon trained in laparoscopy, can determine if laparoscopic gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy) is an appropriate procedure for you.

2844 people found this helpful

Gall Bladder Surgery - Why Is It Required?

Gall Bladder Surgery - Why Is It Required?

Surgery using a laparoscope is the most common way to remove the gallbladder. A laparoscope is a thin, lighted tube that lets the doctor see inside our belly. It is a minimally invasive surgery in which small incisions and specialized tools are used to remove a diseased or infected gallbladder.

The gall bladder is a small organ that sits right under the liver and is credited with bile storage, which can help the body in breaking down various kinds of fats that enter it. So, what all do you need to know about this operation? Read this list.

Reasons for Gall Bladder Operation: The gall bladder is not a very efficient organ. It can lead to blockages and choking as the bile it stores can become very thick and difficult to handle. Also, this bile can start to harbour deposits that are hardball like substances, usually known as gall bladder stones. The size of these stones can vary from the size of a grain to the size of a golf ball. 

Further, these gall bladder stones can cause infections which can lead to symptoms like nausea, vomiting, bloating and more. Another reason can also be the gall bladder disease known as cholelithiasis, which can cause abdominal pain. Inflammation in the pancreas, also known as pancreatitis, can lead to gall bladder open removal surgery.

Risk: While the gall bladder removal surgery is usually considered a safe one, with little or no complications, there are risks attached to this surgery too. These include sudden and excessive bleeding and the creation of blood clots, allergic reactions to the drugs used as well as anaesthesia, blood vessel damage, accelerated heart rate which leads to an increased risk of contracting a heart attack or heart disease, infections, inflammation or swelling in the pancreas, and injuries caused to the bile duct during surgery.

You might also need this type of surgery if you have the following:

1. biliary dyskinesia, which occurs when the gallbladder doesn't fill or empty correctly due to a defect
2. choledocholithiasis, which occurs when gallstones move to the bile duct and potentially cause a blockage that prevents the gallbladder from draining
3. cholecystitis, which is an inflammation of the gallbladder
4. pancreatitis, which is an inflammation of the pancreas

Laparoscopic surgery is preferred over open cholecystectomy surgery because the smaller incisions that are made reduce your risk of infection, bleeding, and recovery time.

Preparation: To prepare for your gall bladder removal surgery, the doctor may ask you to have a prescription fluid so that your bowels are flushed clean. You may also be asked to fast for at least six hours before the surgery so that there is no hindrance to the same. Also, the use of antibacterial soap to bathe is usually prescribed so that the risk of contracting infections decreases.

While this surgery can be a simple one, you will have to take due care after the surgery to ensure that the recovery is fast and virtually pain-free.

2829 people found this helpful

Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal - All You Need To Know!

Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal - All You Need To Know!

What is Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal Surgery (Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy)?

Gallbladder removal is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures. Gallbladder removal surgery is usually performed with minimally invasive techniques and the medical name for this procedure is Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy or Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal.

The gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that rests beneath the right side of the liver. Its main purpose is to collect and concentrate a digestive liquid (bile) produced by the liver. Bile is released from the gallbladder after eating, aiding digestion. Bile travels through narrow tubular channels (bile ducts) into the small intestine. Removal of the gallbladder is not associated with any impairment of digestion in most people.

What Causes Gallbladder Problems?

Gallbladder problems are usually caused by the presence of gallstones which are usually small and hard, consisting primarily of cholesterol and bile salts that form in the gallbladder or in the bile duct.

It is uncertain why some people form gallstones but risk factors include being female, prior pregnancy, age over 40 years and being overweight. Gallstones are also more common as you get older and some people may have a family history of gallstones. There are no known means to prevent gallstones.

These stones may block the flow of bile out of the gallbladder, causing it to swell and resulting in sharp abdominal pain, vomiting, indigestion and, occasionally, fever. If the gallstone blocks the common bile duct, jaundice (yellowing of the skin) can occur.

Diagnosing-

  1. Ultrasound is most commonly used to find gallstones.
  2. In a few more complex cases, another X-ray test such as a CT scan or a gallbladder nuclear medicine scan may be used to evaluate gallbladder disease.

Gallstones do not go away on their own. Some can be temporarily managed by making dietary adjustments, such as reducing fat intake. This treatment has a low, short-term success rate. Symptoms will eventually continue unless the gallbladder is removed. Treatments to break up or dissolve gallstones are largely unsuccessful.

Surgical removal of the gallbladder is the time-honored and safest treatment of gallbladder disease.

What are the Advantages of Performing Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal?

  1. Rather than a five to seven-inch incision, the operation requires only four small openings in the abdomen.
  2. Patients usually have minimal post-operative pain.
  3. Patients usually experience a faster recovery than open gallbladder surgery patients.
  4. Most patients go home the same day of the surgery and enjoy a quicker return to normal activities.

Are you a Candidate?

Although there are many advantages to laparoscopic gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy), the procedure may not be appropriate for some patients who have severe complicated gallbladder disease or previous upper abdominal surgery. A thorough medical evaluation by your personal physician, in consultation with a surgeon trained in laparoscopy, can determine if laparoscopic gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy) is an appropriate procedure for you.
 

2812 people found this helpful

Gallstone Surgery - Everything You Should Know About It!

Gallstone Surgery - Everything You Should Know About It!

The gallbladder is a pear-shaped organ that rests beneath the right side of the liver. Its main purpose is to collect and concentrate a digestive liquid (bile) produced by the liver. Bile is released from the gallbladder after eating, aiding digestion. Bile travels through narrow tubular channels (bile ducts) into the small intestine. Removal of the gallbladder is not associated with any impairment of digestion in most people.

What Causes Gallbladder Problems?
Gallbladder problems are usually caused by the presence of gallstones which are usually small and hard, consisting primarily of cholesterol and bile salts that form in the gallbladder or in the bile duct.
It is uncertain why some people form gallstones but risk factors include being female, prior pregnancy, age over 40 years and being overweight. Gallstones are also more common as you get older and some people may have a family history of gallstones.many fectres are thought to be associated with increased chances of gall stone formation but there is no definite known means to prevent gallstones.

These stones may block the flow of bile out of the gallbladder, causing it to swell and resulting in sharp abdominal pain, vomiting, indigestion and, occasionally, fever. If the gallstone blocks the common bile duct, jaundice (a yellowing of the skin) can occur.

Diagnosing
1) 
Ultrasound is most commonly used to find gallstones.
2) In a few more complex cases, other X-ray, CT scan or a gallbladder nuclear medicine scan may be used to evaluate gallbladder disease

Types of gallstones:
There are three main types of gallstones. They are
1.Mixed stones:
They are made up of cholesterol and salts. They tend to develop in batches.
2.Cholesterol stones: Mainly made of cholesterol, which is crucial to many metabolic processes. They can grow large enough to block the bile ducts.
3.Pigment stones: The colour of bile is greenish-brown, due to some particular pigments.

These Gallstones don’t cause any problems in most cases. But prompt treatment is required if stones block ducts and cause life-threatening complications like infections and inflammation in the pancreas liver, gall bladder intestine and other organs nearby. This may require for removal of the gallbladder through a surgery, known as cholecystectomy, which further includes techniques such as laparoscopic (keyhole) cholecystectomy robotic or open surgery.

The gall bladder is a less vital organ, and the body can cope up normally even after its removal.

The procedure of surgery: Laparoscopic removed of the gall bladder is now the recommended standard of care/gold standard for gallstone disease.

1)The surgery involves the removal of gallbladder and gallstones through several incisions in the abdomen. In order to see clearly, the surgeon inflates the abdomen with air or carbon dioxide.
2)A lighted scope attached to a video camera is inserted into one incision near the belly button. The video monitor is used as a guide for inserting other surgical instruments into the other incisions to remove the gallbladder.
3)Intraoperative cholangiography is the X-ray procedure which shows the anatomy of bile ducts. This may be needed sometimes before the surgeon removes the gallbladder.
4)Bile flows from the liver through the common bile duct after the surgery into the small intestine. As the gallbladder has been removed, the gallbladder can no longer store bile between meals but this has little effect on digestion.
5)In case of open surgery, the surgeon reaches the gallbladder through a large, single incision in the abdominal wall, to perform the removal of gall bladder
4.FAQ: can gall stone treated with Medicines

The answer is both yes or no.

Yes: if gall stone are not symptomatic or have not started causing complications then  certain medicines, diet and lifestyle changes can help in preventing complications

No: gall stone keep on dissolving and new stones keep on forming. there is no medicine proven to have resulted in complete dissolution of gallstones, also new stone from within months so there is actually no actual/definite benefit of removal of stones alone by medicines or even by surgery.

Are you a Candidate?
Although there are many advantages to laparoscopic gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy), the procedure may not be appropriate for some patients who have severe complicated gallbladder disease or previous upper abdominal surgery. A thorough medical evaluation by your personal physician, in consultation with a surgeon trained in laparoscopy, can determine if laparoscopic gallbladder removal (cholecystectomy) is an appropriate procedure for you.

Medical factors to consider before cholecystectomy:
The most important factor is the consideration of your medical history. This is because the pre-existing conditions influence decisions on surgery and anesthetic and information about any bad reactions or side effects from any medications would be helpful for surgery.

Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal Surgery - What Should You Know?
What is Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal Surgery (Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy)?

Gallbladder removal is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures. Gallbladder removal surgery is usually performed with minimally invasive techniques and the medical name for this procedure is Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy or Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal.

Gallstones do not go away on their own. Some can be temporarily managed by making dietary adjustments, such as reducing fat intake. This treatment has a low, short-term success rate. Symptoms will eventually continue unless the gallbladder is removed. Treatments to break up or dissolve gallstones are largely unsuccessful. Surgical removal of the gallbladder is the time-honored and safest treatment of gallbladder disease.

What are the Advantages of Performing Laparoscopic Gallbladder Removal?
1.
Rather than a five to seven-inch incision, the operation requires only four small openings in the abdomen.
2. Patients usually have minimal post-operative pain.
3. Patients usually experience faster recovery than open gallbladder surgery patients.
4. Most patients go home the same day of the surgery and enjoy a quicker return to normal activities.

Complications after gallbladder surgery:
This surgery carries some degree of risk like any other surgery. Complications such as internal bleeding, infection, injury to nearby digestive organs, injury to the bile duct and injury to blood vessels.

Self-care after the surgery:
Taking rest is the most important thing after surgery. Personal hygiene special care to avoid wound infection. Avoid things such as heavy lifting and physical exertion. Early mobility brings early recovery and return to work. The usual recovery period after the surgery is one week. Bathing can be done with waterproof dressing.

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What Are The Treatments Available For Gallstones?

What Are The Treatments Available For Gallstones?

Gallstones are actually hard deposits or lumps that are formed in gallbladder. Gallbladder is a pear shaped, sac-like structure that is located in the upper right part of the abdomen that stores bile. Many people have gallstones present in their bladder but they never know it. This can be an alarming situation for people who have it.

What Causes Gallstones?

There may be several reasons, including:

  1. Your genes
  2. Your weight (Obesity)
  3. Problems with your gallbladder
  4. Diet
  5. Bile can be part of the problem. Your body needs bile, but if it has too much cholesterol in it, that makes gallstones more likely.
  6. It can also happen if your gallbladder can’t empty properly.

Who Is at Risk for Gallstones?

While your body produces cholesterol naturally, you can also take in excess cholesterol through your diet. Many risk factors for gallstones are related to diet. These include:

  1. Being overweight or obese
  2. Eating a diet that’s high in fat or cholesterol
  3. Rapid weight loss within a short period of time
  4. Eating diet that’s low in fiber
  5. Having diabetes mellitus

What are the treatments available for this?

Surgery: One of the famous treatments include surgeries. The famous surgery is Cholecystectomy (Removal of gallbladder) that further includes Laparoscopic surgery and Open cholecystectomy. Laparoscopic surgery in gold standard for GB stones.

Medications: The patients who cannot undergo surgeries can also use drugs like ursodiol and chenodiol. But this can take months or years to remove stones from the bladder. (I personally not seen any patients whos gall stone dissolves completely with any type of medicines.)

You can reduce your risk of gallstones if you:

  1. Don't skip meals: Try to stick to your usual mealtimes each day. Skipping meals or fasting can increase the risk of gallstones.
  2. Lose weight slowly: If you need to lose weight, go slow. Rapid weight loss can increase the risk of gallstones. Aim to lose 1 or 2 pounds (about 0.5 to 1 kilogram) a week.
  3. Maintain a healthy weight: Obesity and being overweight increase the risk of gallstones. Work to achieve a healthy weight by reducing the number of calories you eat and increasing the amount of physical activity you get. Once you achieve a healthy weight, work to maintain that weight by continuing your healthy diet and continuing to exercise.
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