Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}

Kneecap Pain Tips

Symptoms And Treatment Of Dislocated Kneecap!

Dr. Prof. Pradeep Choudhari 87% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MS - Orthopaedics, FIOS (UK), FIAS (GERMANY)
Orthopedist, Indore
Symptoms And Treatment Of Dislocated Kneecap!

Have you suffered from a dislocated kneecap and are looking for effective treatment options? A dislocated kneecap is a very common form of injury that takes around six weeks time to heal. It is generally caused by a blow or a change in direction when your leg is planted on the ground. Such injuries are common during sports and dancing. The patella or knee cap, which sits at the front of the knee, glides over a groove in your joint, on straightening or bending your leg. Dislocations make it come out of the groove, leading to the tearing of the supporting tissues.

Symptoms

  • When your kneecap gets dislocated, it is likely to look out of place, or the angle will seem odd.
  • Other symptoms include severe knee pain, inability to walk, swelling of the knee, inability to straighten the knee, and a popping sensation in the knee.

Treatment

  • A dislocated knee cap is not something very serious and it pops back in place on its own in many cases. However, it is recommended for you to get it diagnosed and treated by a health professional.
  • In case your knee cap goes back into place on its own, you should visit a minor injuries unit or MIU, or an accident and emergency department.
  • If your kneecap does not go back into place by itself, you need to call an ambulance and avoid trying to put it back in place by yourself.
  • On the way to the hospital, or while you wait for the ambulance to arrive, you should sit, keeping your leg in a position that is most comfortable for you.
  • If your kneecap does not correct itself by the time you reach a hospital, it has to be manipulated back in place by a doctor. This process is called reduction.
  • You will be given medication to ensure that you keep relaxed and free from pain during the procedure.
  • After the knee cap is put back in place, an X-ray has to be undertaken to check out if your bones are in the right position. Signs of other damages are also analysed.
  • After the procedure, you will be prescribed painkillers. Your leg will be immobile and put in a removable splint for some time.
  • For effective recovery, you should undergo physiotherapy for several weeks.

A surgery for a dislocated kneecap may only be required to be undertaken in case of a fracture or associated injuries like a ligament tear. A surgery may also be required in case you had experienced a knee cap dislocation in the past. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2421 people found this helpful

Dislocated Kneecap Symptoms and Treatment

Dr. Sanjay Kapoor 87% (219 ratings)
M. Ch. (Orthopedic), MS - Orthopaedics, Diploma In Orthopaedics (D. Ortho), MBBS
Orthopedist, Gurgaon
Dislocated Kneecap   Symptoms and Treatment

Whether you are an athlete or a ballet dancer, you will appreciate the importance of having a stable kneecap. Medically known as the patella, the kneecap is a triangular bone that connects the upper thigh to the lower half of the leg. It sits in a groove in the bottom of the femur (thigh bone). When the leg is bent, it stays within the groove. When the leg is extended, it provides support to the quadriceps muscles.

That being the case, a dislocation of the kneecap is a very common injury. Subluxation is a state where there is partial movement of the kneecap out of its position, thereby making the patient’s kneecap unstable. When it completely moves out of its place, it is known as dislocation. Whether you fall on your knees during a sport or have a fall from a bike or get injured during dance or aerobics, it is common to have a dislocated kneecap. Some people are prone to repeated dislocations.

Symptoms:

The initial injury is very painful and there might also be damage to the surrounding structures. Other symptoms include:

  1. Buckling of the knee, where your legs cannot support your body weight

  2. Sliding of the kneecap to a side

  3. Catching of the knee in the groove when trying to move it

  4. Pain in the front of the kneecap with any activity

  5. Painful while sitting

  6. Swelling and/or stiffness of the knee joint

  7. Crackling/creaking sound when trying to move the knee joint

  8. Inability to straighten the leg

Treatment:

Though these sound scary, the good news is that in 90% of the cases, the knee returns to its position spontaneously. However, putting it back into its place is a simple and safe procedure and can be done by almost any seasoned medical practitioner. The first step is to confirm that the kneecap is indeed dislocated. This can be done by a combination of physical exercise and x-ray. If required, MRI can be used, but it is not required in most cases. Initial treatment would include the following steps in sequence:

  1. Immobilizing the knee with splint by keeping the leg in a straightened position.

  2. Calling for medical assistance immediately. They can replace the knee back in its position carefully (reduction). An injured kneecap can cause what is known as foot drop by putting pressure on the peroneal nerve. The toes drag on the ground, making it difficult for you to walk.

  3. Use ice in the affected area for 15 to 20 minutes, and repeat after three to four hours throughout the day to reduce pain and swelling.

  4. Surgical correction may not be required, if there is a damage to the ligament.

  5. Flat femur and/or tissue laxity can cause repeated dislocations, where physiotherapy and strengthening exercises are useful. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a physiotherapist.
2725 people found this helpful

Dislocated Kneecap - Know About Its Symptoms!

Dr. P. Sharat Kumar 90% (109 ratings)
FFSEM, MFSEM, DIP - SEM GB & I, MCh - Orthopaedics, MS - Orthopaedics, MBBS
Orthopedist, Hyderabad
Dislocated Kneecap - Know About Its Symptoms!

Have you suffered from a dislocated kneecap and are looking for effective treatment options? A dislocated kneecap is a very common form of injury that takes around six weeks time to heal. It is generally caused by a blow or a change in direction when your leg is planted on the ground. Such injuries are common during sports and dancing. The patella or knee cap, which sits at the front of the knee, glides over a groove in your joint, on straightening or bending your leg. Dislocations make it come out of the groove, leading to the tearing of the supporting tissues.

Symptoms

  • When your kneecap gets dislocated, it is likely to look out of place, or the angle will seem odd.
  • Other symptoms include severe knee pain, inability to walk, swelling of the knee, inability to straighten the knee, and a popping sensation in the knee.

Treatment

  • A dislocated knee cap is not something very serious and it pops back in place on its own in many cases. However, it is recommended for you to get it diagnosed and treated by a health professional.
  • In case your knee cap goes back into place on its own, you should visit a minor injuries unit or MIU, or an accident and emergency department.
  • If your kneecap does not go back into place by itself, you need to call an ambulance and avoid trying to put it back in place by yourself.
  • On the way to the hospital, or while you wait for the ambulance to arrive, you should sit, keeping your leg in a position that is most comfortable for you.
  • If your kneecap does not correct itself by the time you reach a hospital, it has to be manipulated back in place by a doctor. This process is called reduction.
  • You will be given medication to ensure that you keep relaxed and free from pain during the procedure.
  • After the knee cap is put back in place, an X-ray has to be undertaken to check out if your bones are in the right position. Signs of other damages are also analysed.
  • After the procedure, you will be prescribed painkillers. Your leg will be immobile and put in a removable splint for some time.
  • For effective recovery, you should undergo physiotherapy for several weeks.

A surgery for a dislocated kneecap may only be required to be undertaken in case of a fracture or associated injuries like a ligament tear. A surgery may also be required in case you had experienced a knee cap dislocation in the past.

5162 people found this helpful

Dislocated Kneecap - Know How Can It Be Treated!

Dr. Chetan Wankhede 92% (57 ratings)
GMC Thrissur, MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery
Orthopedist, Thane
Dislocated Kneecap - Know How Can It Be Treated!

Whether you are an athlete or a ballet dancer, you will appreciate the importance of having a stable kneecap. Medically known as the patella, the kneecap is a triangular bone that connects the upper thigh to the lower half of the leg. It sits in a groove in the bottom of the femur (thigh bone). When the leg is bent, it stays within the groove. When the leg is extended, it provides support to the quadriceps muscles.

That being the case, a dislocation of the kneecap is a very common injury. Subluxation is a state where there is partial movement of the kneecap out of its position, thereby making the patient’s kneecap unstable. When it completely moves out of its place, it is known as dislocation. Whether you fall on your knees during a sport or have a fall from a bike or get injured during dance or aerobics, it is common to have a dislocated kneecap. Some people are prone to repeated dislocations.

Symptoms:

 

 

The initial injury is very painful and there might also be damage to the surrounding structures. Other symptoms include:

  1. Buckling of the knee, where your legs cannot support your body weight

  2. Sliding of the kneecap to a side

  3. 223604Catching of the knee in the groove when trying to move it

  4. Pain in the front of the kneecap with any activity

  5. Painful while sitting

  6. Swelling and/or stiffness of the knee joint

  7. Crackling/creaking sound when trying to move the knee joint

  8. Inability to straighten the leg

Treatment:

Though these sound scary, the good news is that in 90% of the cases, the knee returns to its position spontaneously. However, putting it back into its place is a simple and safe procedure and can be done by almost any seasoned medical practitioner. The first step is to confirm that the kneecap is indeed dislocated. This can be done by a combination of physical exercise and x-ray. If required, MRI can be used, but it is not required in most cases. Initial treatment would include the following steps in sequence:

  1. Immobilizing the knee with splint by keeping the leg in a straightened position.

  2. Calling for medical assistance immediately. They can replace the knee back in its position carefully (reduction). An injured kneecap can cause what is known as foot drop by putting pressure on the peroneal nerve. The toes drag on the ground, making it difficult for you to walk.

  3. Use ice in the affected area for 15 to 20 minutes, and repeat after three to four hours throughout the day to reduce pain and swelling.

  4. Surgical correction may not be required, if there is a damage to the ligament.

  5. Flat femur and/or tissue laxity can cause repeated dislocations, where physiotherapy and strengthening exercises are useful.
2454 people found this helpful

Symptoms and Treatment for Dislocated Kneecap

Dr. Ashutosh Jha 91% (76 ratings)
AO TRAUMA, DNB (Orthopedics), MS Ortho, MBBS
Orthopedist, Ghaziabad
Symptoms and Treatment for Dislocated Kneecap

Whether you are an athlete or a ballet dancer, you will appreciate the importance of having a stable kneecap. Medically known as the patella, the kneecap is a triangular bone that connects the upper thigh to the lower half of the leg. It sits in a groove in the bottom of the femur (thigh bone). When the leg is bent, it stays within the groove. When the leg is extended, it provides support to the quadriceps muscles.

That being the case, a dislocation of the kneecap is a very common injury. Subluxation is a state where there is partial movement of the kneecap out of its position, thereby making the patient’s kneecap unstable. When it completely moves out of its place, it is known as dislocation. Whether you fall on your knees during a sport or have a fall from a bike or get injured during dance or aerobics, it is common to have a dislocated kneecap. Some people are prone to repeated dislocations.

Symptoms:

The initial injury is very painful and there might also be damage to the surrounding structures. Other symptoms include:

  1. Buckling of the knee, where your legs cannot support your body weight

  2. Sliding of the kneecap to a side

  3. Catching of the knee in the groove when trying to move it

  4. Pain in the front of the kneecap with any activity

  5. Painful while sitting

  6. Swelling and/or stiffness of the knee joint

  7. Crackling/creaking sound when trying to move the knee joint

  8. Inability to straighten the leg

Treatment: 

 

Though these sound scary, the good news is that in 90% of the cases, the knee returns to its position spontaneously. However, putting it back into its place is a simple and safe procedure and can be done by almost any seasoned medical practitioner. The first step is to confirm that the kneecap is indeed dislocated. This can be done by a combination of physical exercise and x-ray. If required, MRI can be used, but it is not required in most cases. Initial treatment would include the following steps in sequence:

  1. Immobilizing the knee with splint by keeping the leg in a straightened position.

  2. Calling for medical assistance immediately. They can replace the knee back in its position carefully (reduction). An injured kneecap can cause what is known as foot drop by putting pressure on the peroneal nerve. The toes drag on the ground, making it difficult for you to walk.

  3. Use ice in the affected area for 15 to 20 minutes, and repeat after three to four hours throughout the day to reduce pain and swelling.

  4. Surgical correction may not be required, if there is a damage to the ligament.

  5. Flat femur and/or tissue laxity can cause repeated dislocations, where physiotherapy and strengthening exercises are useful.

In cases of recurrent dislocation of patella, the patient is suppose to undergo a MRI. If the MRI shows that there is complete tear of medial patellofemoral ligament then a surgical correction is advisable because every single episode of dislocation of patella leads to injury to the cartilage which can further damage the joint. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

 

3138 people found this helpful

Dislocated Kneecap - Symptoms and Treatment

Dr. Vivek A N 89% (233 ratings)
MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Chennai
Dislocated Kneecap - Symptoms and Treatment

Have you suffered from a dislocated kneecap and are looking for effective treatment options? A dislocated kneecap is a very common form of injury that takes around six weeks time to heal. It is generally caused by a blow or a change in direction when your leg is planted on the ground. Such injuries are common during sports and dancing. The patella or knee cap, which sits at the front of the knee, glides over a groove in your joint, on straightening or bending your leg. Dislocations make it come out of the groove, leading to the tearing of the supporting tissues.

Symptoms

  • When your kneecap gets dislocated, it is likely to look out of place, or the angle will seem odd.
  • Other symptoms include severe knee pain, inability to walk, swelling of the knee, inability to straighten the knee, and a popping sensation in the knee.

Treatment

  • A dislocated knee cap is not something very serious and it pops back in place on its own in many cases. However, it is recommended for you to get it diagnosed and treated by a health professional.
  • In case your knee cap goes back into place on its own, you should visit a minor injuries unit or MIU, or an accident and emergency department.
  • If your kneecap does not go back into place by itself, you need to call an ambulance and avoid trying to put it back in place by yourself.
  • On the way to the hospital, or while you wait for the ambulance to arrive, you should sit, keeping your leg in a position that is most comfortable for you.
  • If your kneecap does not correct itself by the time you reach a hospital, it has to be manipulated back in place by a doctor. This process is called reduction.
  • You will be given medication to ensure that you keep relaxed and free from pain during the procedure.
  • After the knee cap is put back in place, an X-ray has to be undertaken to check out if your bones are in the right position. Signs of other damages are also analysed.
  • After the procedure, you will be prescribed painkillers. Your leg will be immobile and put in a removable splint for some time.
  • For effective recovery, you should undergo physiotherapy for several weeks.

A surgery for a dislocated kneecap may only be required to be undertaken in case of a fracture or associated injuries like a ligament tear. A surgery may also be required in case you had experienced a knee cap dislocation in the past. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult an orthopedist.

2832 people found this helpful

8 Symptoms Of Dislocated Kneecap And Its Treatment!

Dr. Murali Krishna 89% (108 ratings)
DNB (Orthopedics), MS - Orthopaedics
Orthopedist, Visakhapatnam
8 Symptoms Of Dislocated Kneecap And Its Treatment!

Whether you are an athlete or a ballet dancer, you will appreciate the importance of having a stable kneecap. Medically known as the patella, the kneecap is a triangular bone that connects the upper thigh to the lower half of the leg. It sits in a groove in the bottom of the femur (thigh bone). When the leg is bent, it stays within the groove. When the leg is extended, it provides support to the quadriceps muscles.

That being the case, a dislocation of the kneecap is a very common injury. Subluxation is a state where there is partial movement of the kneecap out of its position, thereby making the patient’s kneecap unstable. When it completely moves out of its place, it is known as dislocation. Whether you fall on your knees during a sport or have a fall from a bike or get injured during dance or aerobics, it is common to have a dislocated kneecap. Some people are prone to repeated dislocations.

Symptoms:

The initial injury is very painful and there might also be damage to the surrounding structures. Other symptoms include:

  1. Buckling of the knee, where your legs cannot support your body weight

  2. Sliding of the kneecap to a side

  3. Catching of the knee in the groove when trying to move it

  4. Pain in the front of the kneecap with any activity

  5. Painful while sitting

  6. Swelling and/or stiffness of the knee joint

  7. Crackling/creaking sound when trying to move the knee joint

  8. Inability to straighten the leg

Treatment:

Though these sound scary, the good news is that in 90% of the cases, the knee returns to its position spontaneously. However, putting it back into its place is a simple and safe procedure and can be done by almost any seasoned medical practitioner. The first step is to confirm that the kneecap is indeed dislocated. This can be done by a combination of physical exercise and x-ray. If required, MRI can be used, but it is not required in most cases. Initial treatment would include the following steps in sequence:

  1. Immobilizing the knee with splint by keeping the leg in a straightened position.

  2. Calling for medical assistance immediately. They can replace the knee back in its position carefully (reduction). An injured kneecap can cause what is known as foot drop by putting pressure on the peroneal nerve. The toes drag on the ground, making it difficult for you to walk.

  3. Use ice in the affected area for 15 to 20 minutes, and repeat after three to four hours throughout the day to reduce pain and swelling.

  4. Surgical correction may not be required, if there is a damage to the ligament.

  5. Flat femur and/or tissue laxity can cause repeated dislocations, where physiotherapy and strengthening exercises are useful. 

Reduction manipulation of pattelar dislocation should be done by qualified orthopaedic surgeon only because forceful and inappropriate manipulation leads to pattelar retinacular tears and chondral injuries to patellar, should be attempted under anaesthesia followed by rehabilitation. In severe, recurrent cases surgical management is the option.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2607 people found this helpful

Super Fact of the Day: The load distributed over your kneecap can be up to 5 times your body weight!

Dr. A. Hussain 92% (246 ratings)
Clinical Exercise Specialist, Certificate in Population Health, Certificate in Diabetology and Prevention, Nutritionist, MHSc (Public Health)Preventive Medcine, MPT - Orthopedic Physiotherapy, ch. Pain Management
Physiotherapist, Delhi
Super Fact of the Day: The load distributed over your kneecap can be up to 5 times your body weight!
Your knees play an important role in weight bearing activities, such as walking, running and going up/down stairs. The load distributed over your kneecaps can be up to 5 times your body weight, especially while climbing down stairs. That is why overweight people often develop knee problems.

Would you like to share this interesting fact with family or friends? go ahead and share!
509 people found this helpful

Knee Pain And Its Causes!

Dr. Gaurav Sharma 84% (30 ratings)
MD, FIPM, CCEPC, Fellowship In Pain Management
Pain Management Specialist, Jaipur
Knee Pain And Its Causes!

Knee pain is characterized by a feeling of pain in the knee joint caused by injury or overuse. The knee joint consists of small bone structures, the kneecap, supporting ligaments and cartilage of the knee. This joint bears the full weight of the body, which makes it very vulnerable to injury.

Causes of knee pain

Knee pain is usually caused by injuries to the knee such as exposure to a direct force on the knee, abnormal twisting of the knee or falling on your knees. Some causes of knee pain are -

  • Knee strains and sprainsOverworking the knee joints can damage the tissues of the knee joint resulting in knee sprains and strains
  • Osteoarthritis - it is condition where the protective cartilage around the kneecap is damaged, resulting in knee pain
  • Bursitis - Excessive movement of the knee or kneeling down for extended periods can irritate the bursa (a fluid sac below the skin above the knee joint) that causes swelling and pain, thereby giving rise to this condition
  • Gout - This condition is characterized by the accumulation of uric acid in crystal form around the knee joint, causing inflammation and pain
  • Tendon disorders - Tendons connect the muscles to the bones, and overworking the knee can cause the tendons around the knee to become sore and painful
  • Kneecap dislocationInjuries may cause the kneecap to shift out of its position, this causes swelling and pain in the knee joint
  • Ligament injuries: The ligaments are what connect your thigh bone to your lower leg bones. They hold your bones together and keep the knee stable. Knee ligament sprains and tears are very common sports injuries, and can occur to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), posterior cruciate ligament (PCL), and medial collateral ligament (MCL). Any of these injuries can result in severe knee pain and could require surgery.

Symptoms of knee pain

Severe knee pain can restrict movements such as walking or standing. The symptoms vary according to the extent of the damage suffered by the knee. Most common symptoms of knee pain are problems in climbing stairs, inability to extend the knees, limping and swelling of the knee joint. In some cases, knee pain may also cause fever.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4201 people found this helpful

Knee Pain

Dr. Nice Joseph 88% (172 ratings)
BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Gurgaon
Knee Pain

Chondromalacia patella (patellofemoral syndrome)

Chondromalacia patella facts
 chondromalacia patella is the most common cause of chronic knee pain.
 chondromalacia patella has also been called patellofemoral syndrome.
 the pain of chondromalacia patella is aggravated by activity or prolonged sitting with bent knees.
 abnormal 'tracking' allows the kneecap (patella) to grate over the lower end of the thighbone (femur), causing chronic inflammation and pain.
 treatment involves improving the alignment of the patella during contraction of the thigh muscle.

What is the chondromalacia patella?

Chondromalacia patella is abnormal softening of the cartilage of the underside the kneecap (patella). It is a cause of pain in the front of the knee (anterior knee pain). Chondromalacia patella is one of the most common causes of chronic knee pain. Chondromalacia patella results from degeneration of cartilage due to poor alignment of the kneecap (patella) as it slides over the lower end of the thighbone (femur). This process is sometimes referred to as a patellofemoral syndrome.

What causes chondromalacia patella?
The patella (kneecap) is normally pulled over the end of the femur in a straight line by the quadriceps (thigh) muscle. Patients with chondromalacia patella frequently have abnormal patellar' tracking' toward the lateral (outer) side of the femur. This slightly off-kilter pathway allows the undersurface of the patella to grate along the femur, causing chronic inflammation and pain. Certain individuals are predisposed to develop chondromalacia patella: females, knock-kneed or flat-footed runners, or those with an unusually shaped patella undersurface.

What are the symptoms and signs of chondromalacia patella?
The symptoms of chondromalacia patella are generally a vague discomfort of the inner front of the knee, aggravated by activity (running, jumping, climbing or descending stairs) or by prolonged sitting with knees in a moderately bent position (the so-called' theater sign' of pain upon arising from a desk or theater seat). Some patients may also have a vague sense of 'tightness' or 'fullness' in the knee area. Occasionally, if chronic symptoms are ignored, the associated loss of quadriceps (thigh) muscle strength may cause the leg to 'give out' besides an obvious reduction in quadriceps muscle mass, mild swelling of the knee area may occur.

How is chondromalacia patella diagnosed?
Chondromalacia patella is suspected in a person with anterior knee pain, especially in teenage females or young adults. With manual compression of the kneecap, while the quadriceps muscle is tightened, there can be pain. This is referred to as the positive 'shrug' sign. Generally, there is no associated swelling (knee joint effusion).

X-rays or MRIs may be done to confirm the inflammation on the posterior part of the patella.

Icon

Book appointment with top doctors for Kneecap Pain treatment

View fees, clinic timings and reviews