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Dr. Apurva Mittal 88% (13 ratings)
BDS, Diploma in Hospital Administration, Diploma in Pharmacy
Dentist, Delhi  •  22 years experience
How Soda Affects Your Teeth

Drinks such as regular soda, diet soda, sports drinks, canned iced tea and lemonades can lead to extensive tooth decay, enamel destruction and poor dental health because of the low pH or acidity of the drinks.

Enamel is the hardest substance in the body but it is susceptible to breakdown from acids found in soda/drinks. The more acidic the drink (the lower its pH), the more rapid the enamel destruction. Tooth enamel dissolves below 5.5. It is important to note that exposed root surfaces demineralize twice as fast as that of enamel.
Soda/drinks may contain carbonic, phosphoric, malic, citric and tartaric acids and therefore have an acidic pH. No differences in enamel breakdown were found between regular and diet versions of the same brand.

Reduce the Risk
1 Drink carbonated beverages (soft drinks, soda pop) in moderation.
2 Give infants and toddlers these beverages in a regular cup.
3 Sucking on a bottle or sippy cup filled with these beverages promotes tooth decay.
4 Use a straw to help keep sugar away from your teeth while drinking.
5 Choose fluoridated water instead of fizzy drinks.
6 Avoid drinking soft drinks and fruit juice before bedtime.
7 Rinse your mouth with water or brush your teeth soon after using either of these.
8 Get regular dental checkups and cleanings

Acid (pH) Low=Bad
Water – 7.00 (neutral)
Brewed Black Coffee – 6.25
Brewed Black Tea – 5.36
A & W Root Beer – 4.80
Diet Sprite – 3.34
Sprite – 3.27
Diet Dew – 3.27
Diet Coke – 3.22
Mountain Dew – 3.14
Gatorade – 2.95
Canada Dry Ginger Ale – 2.94
Diet Pepsi – 2.94
Arizona Iced Tea – 2.94
True Lemon – 2.80
HI Punch – 2.82
Coke – 2.48
Pepsi – 2.46
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