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Heart Tips

Heart Diseases And Homeopathy!

Dr. Swarup Kumar Ghosh 89% (82 ratings)
MD - Bio-Chemistry, MF Homeo (London), DHMS (Diploma in Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery), BHMS
Homeopath, Kolkata
Heart Diseases And Homeopathy!

Heart failure can involve the left side (left ventricle), right side (right ventricle) or both sides of your heart. Generally, heart failure begins with the left side, specifically the left ventricle — your heart's main pumping chamber.

Type of heart failure - Description

Left-sided heart failure - Fluid may back up in your lungs, causing shortness of breath.
Right-sided heart failure - Fluid may back up into your abdomen, legs, and feet, causing swelling.
Systolic heart failure - The left ventricle can't contract vigorously, indicating a pumping problem.

Diastolic heart failure (also called heart failure with preserved ejection fraction) -  The left ventricle can't relax or fill fully, indicating a filling problem.

Any of the following conditions can damage or weaken your heart and can cause heart failure. Some of these can be present without your knowing it:

 

  • Coronary artery disease and heart attack - Coronary artery disease is the most common form of heart disease and the most common cause of heart failure. Over time, arteries that supply blood to your heart muscle narrow from a buildup of fatty deposits — a process called atherosclerosis. The buildup of plaques can cause reduced blood flow to your heart. A heart attack occurs if plaques formed by the fatty deposits in your arteries rupture. This causes a blood clot to form, which may block blood flow to an area of the heart muscle, weakening the heart's pumping ability and often leaving permanent damage. If the damage is significant, it can lead to a weakened heart muscle.
  • High blood pressure (hypertension) - Blood pressure is the force of blood pumped by your heart through your arteries. If your blood pressure is high, your heart has to work harder than it should to circulate blood throughout your body. Over time, the heart muscle may become thicker to compensate for the extra work it must perform. Eventually, your heart muscle may become either too stiff or too weak to effectively pump blood.
  • Faulty heart valves - The valves of your heart keep blood flowing in the proper direction through the heart. A damaged valve — due to a heart defect, coronary artery disease or heart infection — forces your heart to work harder to keep blood flowing as it should. Over time, this extra work can weaken your heart. Faulty heart valves, however, can be fixed or replaced if found in time.
  • Damage to the heart muscle (cardiomyopathy) - Heart muscle damage (cardiomyopathy) can have many causes, including several diseases, infections, alcohol abuse and the toxic effect of drugs, such as cocaine or some drugs used for chemotherapy.
  • Myocarditis - Myocarditis is an inflammation of the heart muscle. It's most commonly caused by a virus and can lead to left-sided heart failure.

 

  • Heart defects you're born with (congenital heart defects) - If your heart and its chambers or valves haven't formed correctly, the healthy parts of your heart have to work harder to pump blood through your heart, which, in turn, may lead to heart failure.

 

  • Abnormal heart rhythms (heart arrhythmias) - Abnormal heart rhythms may cause your heart to beat too fast, which creates extra work for your heart. Over time, your heart may weaken, leading to heart failure. A slow heartbeat may prevent your heart from getting enough blood out to the body and may also lead to heart failure.



Other diseases - Chronic diseases — such as diabetes, HIV, hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, or a buildup of iron (hemochromatosis) or protein (amyloidosis) —also may contribute to heart failure.

Causes of acute heart failure include viruses that attack the heart muscle, severe infections, allergic reactions, blood clots in the lungs, the use of certain medications or any illness that affects the whole body.

Symptoms -
Heart failure can be ongoing (chronic), or your condition may start suddenly (acute).
Heart failure signs and symptoms may include:

  • shortness of breath (dyspnea) when you exert yourself or when you lie down
  • fatigue and weakness
  • swelling (edema) in your legs, ankles, and feet
  • rapid or irregular heartbeat
  • reduced ability to exercise
  • a persistent cough or wheezing with white or pink blood-tinged phlegm
  • increased need to urinate at night
  • swelling of your abdomen (ascites)
  • sudden weight gain from fluid retention
  • lack of appetite and nausea
  • difficulty concentrating or decreased alertness
  • sudden, severe shortness of breath and coughing up pink, foamy mucus
  • chest pain if your heart failure is caused by a heart attack


Risk factors -  A single risk factor may be enough to cause heart failure, but a combination of factors also increases your risk.

Risk factors include:

  • High blood pressure - Your heart works harder than it has to if your blood pressure is high.
  • Coronary artery disease - Narrowed arteries may limit your heart's supply of oxygen-rich blood, resulting in weakened heart muscle.
  • Heart attack - Damage to your heart muscle from a heart attack may mean your heart can no longer pump as well as it should.
  • Diabetes - Having diabetes increases your risk of high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. Some diabetes medications. The diabetes drugs rosiglitazone (Avandia) and pioglitazone (Actos) have been found to increase the risk of heart failure in some people. Don't stop taking these medications on your own, though. If you're taking them, discuss with your doctor whether you need to make any changes.
  • Certain medications - Some medications may lead to heart failure or heart problems. Medications that may increase the risk of heart problems include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs); certain anesthesia medications; some antiarrhythmic medications; certain medications used to treat high blood pressure, cancer, blood conditions, neurological conditions, psychiatric conditions, lung conditions, urological conditions, inflammatory conditions and infections; and other prescription and over-the-counter medications. Don't stop taking any medications on your own. If you have questions about medications you're taking, discuss with your doctor whether he or she recommends any changes.

 

  • Sleep apnea - The inability to breathe properly while you sleep at night results in low blood oxygen levels and increased risk of abnormal heart rhythms. Both of these problems can weaken the heart.

 

  • Congenital heart defects - Some people who develop heart failure were born with structural heart defects.
  • Valvular heart disease - People with valvular heart disease have a higher risk of heart failure. 
  • Viruses - A viral infection may have damaged your heart muscle.
  • Alcohol use - Drinking too much alcohol can weaken the heart muscle and lead to heart failure.
  • Tobacco use - Using tobacco can increase your risk of heart failure.
  • Obesity - People who are obese have a higher risk of developing heart failure.
  • Irregular heartbeats - These abnormal rhythms, especially if they are very frequent and fast, can weaken the heart muscle and cause heart failure.

Complications - If you have heart failure, your outlook depends on the cause and the severity, your overall health, and other factors such as your age. Complications can include:

 

  1. Kidney damage or failure - Heart failure can reduce the blood flow to your kidneys, which can eventually cause kidney failure if left untreated. Kidney damage from heart failure can require dialysis for treatment.
  2. Heart valve problems -The valves of your heart, which keep blood flowing in the proper direction through your heart, may not function properly if your heart is enlarged or if the pressure in your heart is very high due to heart failure.
  3. Heart rhythm problems - Heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias) can be a potential complication of heart failure.
  4. Liver damage - Heart failure can lead to a buildup of fluid that puts too much pressure on the liver. This fluid backup can lead to scarring, which makes it more difficult for your liver to function properly.


Homeopathic remedies:-
Homeopathy today is a rapidly growing system and is being practiced all over the world. Its strength lies in its evident effectiveness as it takes a holistic approach towards the sick individual through the promotion of inner balance at mental, emotional, spiritual and physical levels. When heart failure is concerned there are many effective medicines are available in homeopathy, but the selection depends upon the individuality of the patient, considering the mental and physical symptoms.

  • Aurum metallicum 30 - Heart failure after valvular lesions. Hear feels loose on walking. Sensations as if heart stopped beating for two or three seconds, immediately followed by tumultuous rebound with sinking at the epigastrium. Oppression at the heart. Pulse rapid, feeble and irregular. Blood pressure high.
  • Digitalis purpurea 3x - Digitalis is an excellent remedy for heart failure with the irregular heartbeat. Sensation as if heart would stop beating if moved, must hold the breath and keep still. Pulse full, irregular, very slow and weak, intermitting every third, fifth, or seventh beat. Weak heart. The least movement causes violent palpitations. Frequent stitches in the heart.
  • Strophanthus his. Q - Strophanthus is best for heart failure with edema of legs. Heart’s action weak, rapid, irregular, due to muscular debility and insufficiency. Pulse rapid, alternating with slow, weak, small irregular.
  • Laurocerasus 30 - Laurocerasus is best for heart failure with pain in the region of the heart. There is clutching at heart and palpitations. Pulse weak, variable, slow or irregular. Urine, retained, suppressed involuntary with palpitations and suffocations and fainting.
  • Crataegus oxy. Q - Crataegus is considered a heart tonic. Heart muscles seem flabby, worn out. Heart weakness with oppression, stitches, and insomnia. Extreme dyspnea on least exertion without much increase of pulse. Heart dilated, first sound weak. Incompetent valves, valvular murmurs.
  • Cardus marianus q - Cardus marianus is effective for heart failure with liver complaints. Pain pressure and stitches in the region of the heart, oppression of deep breathing.
  • Naja tripudians 30 - Naja is best for heart failure with weakness and valvular disorders. Visible palpitations. Damaged heart after infectious diseases.
  • Nux vomica 30 - Nux vomica is an excellent remedy for heart failure seen in alcoholics. Hear feels tired, palpitation on lying down. Usually constipated with ineffectual desire.
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1 person found this helpful

7 Tips To Keep Your Heart Healthy

Dt. Anupreksha Rastogi 90% (139 ratings)
M.Sc. Food & Nutrition, D.N.H.E, NET
Dietitian/Nutritionist, Zirakpur
7 Tips To Keep Your Heart Healthy

If you are concerned about your heart’s health, it is important for you to make some dietary modifications. Simple changes in your everyday diet may offer benefits, which help in preventing future heart problems. If you suffer from high blood pressure or high cholesterol or have atrial fibrillation.

Here are some tips regarding the best diet for protecting your heart:

  1. Believe in the food hype: Having healthy meals is certainly beneficial and makes a big difference to your heart health. Consuming meals which contain vegetables, grains, low fat dairy and lean meat will allow you to live a longer and healthier life.
  2. Avoid crash diets: A crash diet may be effective, if you want to fit in a dress within one month. However, for improving your heart health, undertaking different fad diets is not useful. Meals in which a certain type of nutrients such as carbohydrates or fats are ruled out are not beneficial as well. You should have a sensible approach towards your diet and focus on food products such as vegetables, whole grains and lean meat.
  3. Do not overeat: Overeating will lead to weight gain and commonly, many people get heart attack after taking a big meal.
  4. Eat less salt: You should consume less amount of salt in your diet and do not eat more than one teaspoon of salt a day. Avoid any food item which contains high amounts of sodium. Salt is responsible for increasing blood pressure.
  5. Limit your intake of alcohol and caffeineIn case you suffer from atrial fibrillation, you should avoid caffeine and any other stimulant as they tend to trigger the symptoms. You must drink moderately as consuming more than one drink a day increases your risks of having heart problems.
  6. Choose meat wisely: You should avoid red meat, which contains large amount of saturated fats as these are not good for the heart. You should choose the leanest cuts of meats and trim all fat from it. You should opt for cuts such as flank, rump roast, tenderloin and sirloin. Pork tenderloin, chicken and turkey breast are other alternatives.
  7. Add fish to your diet: Fish is essential for improving your heart health. Try to avoid having deep fried fish and choose grilled fish or roasted fish, which are rich in Omega-3 fatty acids. Consume fishes like tuna, salmon, trout and sardines.

You should also add whole grains to your diet. They are effective in controlling blood sugar and lower the chances of diabetes. Hence, the risks of heart diseases are less if you do not have diabetes. Whole grains also help with weight loss, which is beneficial for the heart.

1 person found this helpful

5 Things To Keep In Mind When Living With A Heart Patient!

Dr. Indranil Dutta 84% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MD
Internal Medicine Specialist, Kolkata
5 Things To Keep In Mind When Living With A Heart Patient!

The heart is a muscle that pumps blood to the body through a network of arteries and veins controlled by valves. A heart disease could mean a problem in any of these organs, heart per se, the blood vessels, or the valves. Like it or not, heart problem is a chronic condition. It starts without any notice, and for sure, it is not going to go away completely. What can be done, though, is to manage it beautifully and lives and enjoy life so that the heart disease is not stopping you.

When there is a person with the chronic condition, it is not just that person who is affected, but the near and dear ones as well. When heading out for a dinner or when planning a gathering, there would be certain things that need to be accounted for and considered to accommodate the needs of the affected person. These very soon become a way of life and can be done effortlessly.

The following are some things to bear in mind when living with a heart patient.

  1. Diet: Heart patients would have some dietary preferences based on the heart condition per se. This may include a need for more whole grains and vegetables, need for specific types of oils, specific cooking methods, etc. At home, it is essential to ensure these things are always stocked up. When heading out, whether it is to visit someone or out for a meal, take into account whether these would be available. The next best option should be kept in mind so that dietary intake is not affected. Gradually, with time, substitutes can be identified with which they could manage in most places.
  2. Medications: Make sure the medication kit is always readily available. Make sure the person does not miss any medications, whether at home or outside. Ensure the regular medicines are in stock and some common emergency ones are also readily available.
  3. Routine: Whether it is their morning walk or yoga or meditation, it is better to stick to the routine as much as possible. The person also should learn to adapt based on circumstances; however, to the maximum extent possible, these should be continued without major interruption.
  4. Monitoring: Be it blood pressure, sugar levels or weight, these need to be monitored regularly and any deviations should be brought to the notice of the doctor immediately.
  5. Other equipment: Whether it is a walker, inhaler, or a wheelchair, these should be functional and available. The home or the living place should not be cluttered to allow for the easy use of this equipment.

While these may initially require some effort, with time, it would just happen naturally.

2 people found this helpful

How To Face A Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

Dr. Vijaysinh Patil 87% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DNB - General Medicine, DNB Cardiology, FNB Intervention Cardiology
Cardiologist, Nashik
How To Face A Sudden Cardiac Arrest?

A sudden cardiac arrest is not same as a normal heart attack. While a heart attack refers to the blocking of blood flow to the heart, a sudden cardiac arrest refers to when the heart stops beating unexpectedly. Sudden cardiac arrests occur without warning and often this condition is triggered by electrical malfunctioning in the heart that causes arrhythmia. When the heart stops beating, blood cannot be pumped to the brain and other organs and the person loses consciousness. If a patient does not receive immediate treatment, this could be fatal. Hence it is important to know what first aid a person experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest requires.

Help

Do not wait for someone else to help a person experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest. The first few moments after such an experience are critical and hence your decision to help is what could save the person’s life.

Call a Doctor

The first thing to do when you see someone experiencing a cardiac arrest is to call emergency and request an ambulance. If you do not have a phone available, ask someone else to do it.

CPR

After a cardiac arrest, it is essential to get the heart to start beating again as soon as possible. CPR or Cardiopulmonary resuscitation can save lives in this situation. If you are trained in this procedure, start with 30 chest compressions before checking the patient’s airway and performing rescue breathing. If you are not trained in CPR, ask the people around if anyone else is.

If no one around can perform CPR, start hands-only CPR. Make the person lie flat on their back and kneel next to their shoulders. Place the heel of one palm in the centre of the person’s chest with the other hand over it. Keep your elbows straight and position your elbows such that they are directly over your hands. Use your upper body weight to push down straight on the person’s chest and release. Try and achieve a rate of 100 compressions a minute. Continue until the person starts breathing again or medical help arrives.

Use an Automated External Defibrillator (AED)

If an AED is available, place the electrode pads on the person’s chest as shown in the diagrams that come along with the AED. Follow the visual and voice prompts. Do not worry if the AED shocks the patient as this electrical therapy can help restart the heart.

439 people found this helpful

Hereditary Heart Disease - How To Combat It?

Dr. Susanta Pradhan 86% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Cardiology
Cardiologist, Bhubaneswar
Hereditary Heart Disease - How To Combat It?

While you may be worried about being affected with coronary diseases just because your forefathers suffered from it, there are various factors that are absolutely in your sole control. With a little change in lifestyle and following a well-regulated routine, you can easily keep your hereditary cardiac diseases at bay.

  1. Take a Healthy Diet Regularly: Increase the amount of green leafy vegetables and colourful fruits in your regular diet as they are rich in phytonutrients and other anti-oxidants, vitamins, fibres, minerals as well as anti-inflammatory molecules that would increase your immunity.
  2. Regulate Your Blood-Sugar Level: Studies show that blood sugar is a great contributor to cardiac diseases. So try to replace your high-carb diet with loads of fibre, protein and healthy fats to keep your blood-sugar level in control.
  3. Increase the Intake of Fibre: Try to increase the amount of fibre in your food chart by having lots of fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts and soya so that it amounts up to at least 50 grams a day. You may even include fibre supplements in your diet.
  4. Stay Away From Processed and Junk Food: We know you are crazy about fast food, but you must also include sodas, processed jams, fruit juices and soft drinks as well, which are the greatest contributors to diabetes and in turn lead to heart diseases.
  5. Increase the Intake of Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Try to include cold-water fish like sardine, salmon and herring along with flax seeds and sea weeds. This 'good' fat would keep your cholesterol level in check and lower down the amount of malicious LDL levels and transform them into harmless LDL particles.
  6. Get Rid of all Hydrogenated Food: This implies that you should abstain from having cookies, margarine, baked stuff and crackers. Don't be fooled by the label saying, "no trans-fat" and instead look for healthy coconut, olive or sesame oil.
  7. Abstain from Consuming Alcohol: Alcohol can do no good to any organ of your body. Instead, it triggers the amount of triglycerides, causes fatty liver and creates sugar imbalance in your body. By reducing alcohol consumption you can reduce inflammation, which causes various chronic diseases.
  8. Have good quality supplements: Along with having a healthy diet and workout, you must try to take in multivitamin and mineral supplements regularly to keep fit and active all around the year.
  9. Exercise Regularly: Researches report that a minimum of half an hour's exercise is required by our body regularly. After all, the heart is a muscle, and you must work out regularly to keep it healthy for a longer span.
  10. Manage your Stress Levels: Stress alone can lead to a fatal heart attack without prior signal. Take the time out to indulge in yoga, meditation, tai chi or anything that would keep your stress levels under control and help you to lead a happier, healthier life.

These 10 easy ways will help you to prevent cardiac diseases; but you must consult a responsive cardiologist at the earliest.

5 people found this helpful

Heart Bypass Surgery Brings Long-Term Benefits!

Dr. Vivek Baliga B 92% (39 ratings)
MBBS, MRCP (UK), PG Diploma In Lipid Management, MBA (Healthcare)
Cardiologist, Bangalore
Heart Bypass Surgery Brings Long-Term Benefits!

Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG) is a traditional and well established surgical procedure for treating diseases in the coronary artery. The process is carried out by using blood vessels alternately (vein or artery). Initially, CABG was performed by using the left internal mammary artery and saphenous vein. It was observed that the chance of occlusion in the vein grafts was much higher than the arterial grafts. In the last decade, total arterial grafting, which uses all the arterial conduits, is being practiced as CABG for better results.

Types of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

  1. Traditional Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: In this type of CABG, the surgeon will initially open up the chest bone to gain access to the heart. The heart is stopped using medications and the body is connected to a heart-lung bypass machine to circulate oxygen and blood throughout the body.
  2. Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting: In this surgery, small incisions are made on the left portion of the chest to gain access to the heart. This surgery is used to bypass the blood vessels present in the front portion of the heart.
  3. Off-pump Coronary artery bypass grafting: In this procedure, the chest bone is opened up to access the heart. Here, however, the heart is not stopped during the surgery.

Patients, who have been suffering since a long time and have been operated on the vein grafts, have a chance of re-developing certain artery diseases such as a heart attack. To counter this possibility, surgeons have started using the method of Total Artery CABG. In this procedure, the left and right internal mammary arteries are used from the chest and the radial artery, from the fore arm for the surgery.

The main advantages of this procedure are:

  1. The survival rate is higher in total artery CABG as compared to the traditional CABG.
  2. It comes with long term benefits
  3. The procedure is safe as well as feasible


 

3 people found this helpful

Aortic Valve Stenosis - Diagnostic Tests That Can Be Of Help!

Dr. Birinder Singh Thind 89% (52 ratings)
Ph.D Cardiology, M.D, Higher secondary
Cardiologist, Noida
Aortic Valve Stenosis - Diagnostic Tests That Can Be Of Help!

Aortic valve stenosis is a heart condition in which the valve to the biggest artery- the one which provides oxygen-rich blood to our body, called aorta, is narrowed. This prevents the valve from opening fully, obstructing the blood flow from your heart into your body.

When the aortic valve doesn’t open, your heart needs to work harder to pump blood to your body making the heart muscle weak. If left undiagnosed aortic stenosis is fatal.

Symptoms

These symptoms should spur you on to seek medical care right away:

  1. Chest pain or tightness

  2. Feeling faint with exertion

  3. Shortness of breath

  4. Fatigue after increased activity

  5. Heart palpitations — rapid, fluttering heartbeat

  6. Heart murmur

The disorder doesn’t produce symptoms right away and is usually diagnosed during routine physical exams when your doctor listens to your heart with a stethoscope. He usually hears a heart murmur resulting from turbulent blood flow through the narrowed aortic valve.

Diagnostic Tests

There are other ways to diagnose aortic valve stenosis and gauge the severity of the problem, like:

  1. Echocardiogram – This produces an image of your heart using sound. It is the primary test to diagnose a heart valve problem. Sound waves are directed at your heart here and these bounce off your heart and are processed electronically to provide images of your heart. This test helps your doctor check diagnose aortic valve stenosis and its severity plus chalk out a treatment plan.

  2. Electrocardiogram (ECG) –  In this test, patches with electrodes are attached to your chest to measure electrical impulses given out by your heart. These are then recorded as waves on a monitor and printed on paper. Though this can’t diagnose aortic stenosis directly, it can tell you that the left ventricle in your heart is thickened which normally happens due to aortic stenosis.

  3. Chest X-ray This allows the doctor to see the shape and size of your heart directly. If the left ventricle is thickened, it points to aortic stenosis. It also helps doctor check the lungs. Aortic stenosis leads to fluid and blood in the lungs, causing congestion.

  4. Exercise Tests – Exercise is used to increase your heart rate and make your heart work harder. This test is done to see how your heart reacts to exertion.

  5. Computerised Tomography (CT) Scan –  This means a series of X-rays to create images of your heart and observes the heart valves. It is also used to measure the size of aorta and the aortic valve.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) –  This uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create images of your heart and valves.

Once aortic valve stenosis is confirmed, you may have to go in for monitoring or heart valve surgery according to your doctor’s advice.

2546 people found this helpful

How Diabetes Causes Cardiovascular Problems?

Dr. Neeta Shah 89% (75 ratings)
MBBS, Diploma In Diabetology
Diabetologist, Mumbai
How Diabetes Causes Cardiovascular Problems?

Since blood is part of the cardiovascular system, and diabetes is a condition in which the level of glucose in the blood is higher than normal, then is certainly some relationship between the two.

Diabetes and cardiovascular system diseases has been recognized to be closely related to each other due to the so-called insulin resistance syndrome or metabolic syndrome. Some examples of the commonly diagnosed cardiovascular disease are coronary heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and other heart conditions.

Diabetes is considered a major risk factor in cardiovascular diseases. Other factors that contribute to the possibility of acquiring cardiovascular diseases in diabetic patients include hypertension, smoking, and dyslipidemia.

How Diabetes Causes Cardiovascular Problems?

1. Hypertension: Hypertension in diabetes is considered a major contributor to the increase in mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Diabetic patients, especially those with Type 2, need to always have their blood pressure checked every visit to the doctor. Self-monitoring at home is also a must to maintain and control the rise of blood pressure. The American Diabetes Association recommends a target blood pressure of not more than 130/85 mm Hg to maintain a good level of blood pressure.

2. Arteriosclerosis and Atherosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis is the stiffening or hardening of the artery walls while Atherosclerosis is the narrowing of the artery because of plaque build-up. Atherosclerosis is a form of hardening of the blood vessels/arteries, caused by fatty deposits and local tissue reaction in the walls of the arteries. Diabetes is a documented high risk factor for the development of both Atherosclerosis & Arteriosclerosis . Heart disease and stroke, arising mainly from the effects of atherosclerosis, account for 65 percent of deaths among diabetics.

3. Hyperglycemia: Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes, when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin.

There is a growing recognition that diabetes belongs to a special category of risk factors because it markedly increases risk of CVD. This increase is partly the result of the pernicious effects of persistent hyperglycemia on the vasculature and partly due to the coexistence of other metabolic risk factors.

5. Smoking: Smoking has been determined dangerous to our health. Studies show that smoking indeed increase risk of premature death and cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.

6. Atrial Fibrillation: Atrial Fibrillation means an irregular and rapid heart rate which can increase the risk of stroke, heart failure and other cardiac issues. Individuals with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation. This risk is higher among patients with a longer duration of treated diabetes and poorer glycemic control.

Individuals with insulin resistance or diabetes in combination with one or more of these risk factors are at even greater risk of heart disease or stroke. However, by managing their risk factors, patients with diabetes may avoid or delay the development of heart and blood vessel disease. Your health care provider will do periodic testing to assess whether you have developed any of these risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease.
 

3943 people found this helpful

Rheumatic Heart Disease - Things To Know!

Dr. Indranil Dutta 84% (10 ratings)
MBBS, MD
Internal Medicine Specialist, Kolkata
Rheumatic Heart Disease - Things To Know!

Some people have a sore throat which they think will go away sooner rather than later. Well, while it may not seem serious, rheumatic heart disease means that it could potentially be! But, how exactly?

A sore throat usually comes about on account of bacteria affecting the region of the throat.

Sometimes what can happen is that the same bacteria can go all the way to the heart and damage the valves of it. This is very serious as the health of a person fundamentally depends on the health of his or her heart!

When a sore throat does not seem to be getting better even after about three days go by, the first thing which is to be done is to see a doctor. This is due to the fact that delays can result in the situation getting worse. As a result of this, treatment can get more complex. And who wishes to compound their own miseries, after all?

Children who are aged between five and fifteen years of age are at risk of rheumatic heart disease. Now, while it is true that children are likely to fall sick more often than adults as their immune systems may not be all that strong, a special eye is to be kept out for rheumatic heart disease. The general symptoms which a parent should look out for are a sore throat, a cough and a fever. The tough part is that these symptoms appear which a range of other conditions!

When it comes to knowing that rheumatic heart disease is what is affecting a person, a special blood test is taken and if there is a need, an ECG and some other measures confirm rheumatic heart disease. Penicillin is a wonder drug and it is used in the treatment of rheumatic heart disease, as well. It is the general form of treatment, in fact, and people with the disease are often put on a course of injections. This means that they need to have an injection every 28 days for a month so as to make sure that there is no further damage which can affect the valves of the heart. The importance of this cannot be impressed enough.

It is unfortunate that in many cases, people only discover that they have rheumatic heart disease once they reach adulthood. The valves of the heart may be leaking or significantly damaged by the time that the discovery is made. Is it not a lot better to save oneself from this sort of situation?

Top 10 Cardiologist in Mumbai!

Dr. Sanjeev Kumar Singh 87% (192 ratings)
Bachelor of Ayurveda, Medicine and Surgery (BAMS)
Ayurveda, Lakhimpur Kheri
Top 10 Cardiologist in Mumbai!

Day to day stress, poor lifestyle and lack of physical activity can lead to many problems including risk of heart problems. These top 10 cardiologist can help you in assessing the functioning of heart and help in a proper diagnosis and treatment of any cardiac problems, if any. A cardiologist can treat a number of diseases related to heart problems such as coronary artery disease, congenital heart defects, valvular heart disease, heart failure, hypertension, cardiomyopathy. 

Below is the list of top 10 cardiologist in Mumbai:

1. Dr. Ramesh Kawar

MBBS, MD - Cardiology, DM

Consultation fees: ₹800 - 1000

Dr. Ramesh Kawar is a senior Interventional Cardiologist. He is currently associated with Bombay Hospital and Riddhi Vinayak Critical Care & Cardiac Centre. He has an experience of 18 years in this field and has undergone  several fellowships in cardiology. His areas of interest are Percutaneous Coronary Angioplasty and Stent Implantation, Primary Angioplasty in Acute Myocardial Infarction, Acute Coronary Care, Clinical Cardiology and Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty via Radial Artery Route.

2. Dr. G Manoj

Masters in diabetes, Diploma in Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹700 

Dr. G Manoj is a reputed cardiologist & diabetologist in Mumbai and has 12 years of experience. He is currently affiliated with Asian Heart Institute and Good Health Super Speciality Clinic. He also holds the  position of President of the Maharashtra Chapter of Indian Association of Clinical Cardiologists. His areas of interest are treating various cardiovascular conditions like abdominal aortic aneurysm, angina pectoris, arrhythmia, atherosclerosis, cardiomyopathy, heart failure and peripheral artery bypass.

3. Dr. Priyank Mody

DNB Cardiology, MD - General Medicine, MBBS

Consultation fees: ₹1200 - 2000

Dr. Priyank is currently practicing as Director, Cardiac Pacing & Electrophysiology at Fortis Hospital, Okhla. His areas of clinical interest are Electrophysiologic Study, Catheter RF Ablation of complex arrhythmias, 3D Mapping of Cardiac Arrhythmias with CARTO and Ensite, Implantation of Permanent Pacemakers, Implantation of ICD, Implantation of Biventricular pacemakers (CRT)
Implantation of CRT-D (Combo Device), Lead Extraction and Coronary Angiography. He is not only member of some reputed national and international organisations, but also recipetents of many awards. 

4. Dr. Chandrashekhar Munjewar

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹1000 - 1200

Dr. Chandrashekhar Munjewar has 13 years of experience and is a famous cardiologist in Mumbai. He is known for his clinical approach and intervention expertise.His areas of expertise are echocardiography, angiography, angioplasty, pacemaker. He currently practices at Sohum Health care centre, Parisoha Foundation, Shantiniketan hospital and S.L.Raheja Fortis Hospital.

5. Dr. Ameya Udyavar

MBBS, M.D - General Medicine , Diplomate of N.B - Cardiology , DM - Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹1400 - 1500

Dr. Ameya Udyavar is a senior consultant cardiologist and cardiac electrophysiologist. He has 23 years of experience. He specializes in treatment of arrhythmias (heart beat problems) and device implants like pacemakers, ICD. He can be visited at P.D. Hinduja National Hospital and Fortis Hospital - Mulund. 

6. Dr. Zakia Khan

MBBS, MD - Medicine, DM - Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹1000 - 1500

 Dr. Zakia Khan is practicing from last 32 years as interventional cardiologist.  She has an extensive experience of handling clinical, non-invasive, invasive cardiology,  acute myocardial infarction, cardiac emergencies in paediatric  and adult patients. Her specialization is  transesophageal echocardiography. Dr. Khan is associated with Fortis Hospital, Mumbai.

7. Dr. Hasmukh Ravat

MBBS, MD - Medicine, DM - Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹600 - 1500

Dr. Ravat is a senior cardiologist with 36 years of practice. He is currently working Fortis Heart Hospital as head of cardiology. He has performed more than 4000 angioplasty. While his primary interest lies in Coronary and Peripheral Angioplasty, his experience spans the entire spectrum of clinical and invasive cardiology, including expertise in simple and complex Coronary Angioplasty, Renal and Carotid Angioplasty and Pacemakers.

8. Dr. Ruchit Shah

MBBS, DNB, DNB - Cardiology, Fellowship In Interventional Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹1000 

Dr Ruchit Shah has 14 years of experience as interventional cardiologist and specializes in coronary angiography, coronary angioplasty, Optical Coherence Tomography and invasive imaging techniques.  He is associated with multiple hospitals and clinics in Mumbai. He has also been part of various clinical trials and has presented number of papers across India and internationally.

9. Dr. Sudheer Deodatta Palkar

M.Ch - Cardio Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, MS- General Surgery

Dr. Sudheer has 42 years of practice in the field of Cardiac interventions and Electrophysiology. In so many years of his practice, he has performed thousands of angioplasties and has also handled some complex cases of angioplasties. He is considered to be a pioneer of using advanced technologies like bifurcation and left main angioplasties with Rota Ablation. 

10. Dr. Rajiv Karnik

MBBS, MD - General Medicine, DM - Cardiology

Consultation fees: ₹560-1500 

Dr. Rajiv Karnik is a brilliant academic student and had bagged a total of six gold medals in his MBBS, MD and DM and recipient of Rashtriya Ratna award . He was the first Cardiologist in the city of Bombay to implant ICD - Pacemaker device at Bombay Hospital. His special interest is in Coronary interventions, pacemaker & implantable defibrillator (ICD) device implantations, academic and clinical cardiology. He has more than 38 years of experience and is practicing at multiple hospitals in Mumbai.

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