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Peripheral Tips

what is diabetic ?

Dr. Prashant K Vaidya 91% (15775 ratings)
Diploma In Gastroenterology, Diploma In Dermatology, BHMS
Homeopath, Hyderabad
what is diabetic ?

Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerves throughout your body. Diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet.

Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your legs and feet to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. Some people have mild symptoms. But for others, diabetic neuropathy can be quite painful and disabling.

Diabetic neuropathy is a common and serious complication of diabetes. But you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle.

Signs and symptoms :

Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms:

Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes.
Tingling or burning sensation.
Sharp pains or cramps.
Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bedsheet can be painful.
Muscle weakness.

Autonomic Neuropathy symptoms :

This type usually affects the digestive system, especially the stomach. It can also affect the blood vessels, urinary system, and sex organs.

Bloating
Diarrhea
Constipation
Heartburn
Nausea
Vomiting
Feeling full after small meals

Radiculoplexus neuropathy :
Severe pain in a hip and thigh or buttock that occurs in a day or more
Eventual weak and shrinking thigh muscles
Difficulty rising from a sitting position
Abdominal swelling, if the abdomen is affected
Weight loss

Mononeuropathy:

Shin or foot
Lower back or pelvis
Front of thigh
Chest or abdomen
Difficulty focusing
Double vision
Aching behind one eye
Paralysis on one side of your face (Bell's palsy)

Causes:

Damage to nerves and blood vessels
The exact cause likely differs for each type of neuropathy. Researchers think that over time, uncontrolled high blood sugar damages nerves and interferes with their ability to send signals, leading to diabetic neuropathy. High blood sugar also weakens the walls of the small blood vessels (capillaries) that supply the nerves with oxygen and nutrients.

However, a combination of factors may lead to nerve damage, including:

Inflammation in the nerves caused by an autoimmune response. The immune system mistakes nerves as foreign and attacks them.
Genetic factors unrelated to diabetes may make some people more likely to develop nerve damage.
Smoking and alcohol abuse damage both nerves and blood vessels and significantly increase the risk of infection.

Diagnosis:

A doctor can usually diagnose diabetic neuropathy by performing a physical exam and carefully reviewing your symptoms and medical history.

Your doctor will check your:

Overall muscle strength and tone
Tendon reflexes
Sensitivity to touch and vibration
Also at every visit, your doctor should check your feet for sores, cracked skin, blisters, and bone and joint problems. The American Diabetes Association recommends that all people with diabetes have a comprehensive foot exam at least once a year.

Along with the physical exam, your doctor may perform or order specific tests to help diagnose diabetic neuropathy, such as:

Filament test. Your doctor will brush a soft nylon fiber (monofilament) over areas of your skin to test your sensitivity to touch.
Quantitative sensory testing. This noninvasive test is used to tell how your nerves respond to vibration and changes in temperature.
Nerve conduction studies. This test measures how quickly the nerves in your arms and legs conduct electrical signals. It's often used to diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome.
Electromyography (EMG). Often performed along with nerve conduction studies, EMG measures the electrical discharges produced in your muscles.
Autonomic testing. If you have symptoms of autonomic neuropathy, special tests may be done to determine how your blood pressure changes while you are in different positions, and whether you sweat normally.

Prevention:

You can prevent or delay diabetic neuropathy and its complications by keeping tight control of your blood sugar and taking good care of your feet.

Blood sugar control
Use an at-home blood sugar monitor to check your blood sugar and make sure it consistently stays within target range. It's important to do this on schedule. Shifts in blood sugar levels can accelerate nerve damage.

The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes have the A1C test at least twice a year. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. If your blood sugar isn't well-controlled or you change medications, you may need to get tested more often.

Foot care
Follow your doctor's recommendations for good foot care.

Foot problems, including sores that don't heal, ulcers and even amputation, are a common complication of diabetic neuropathy. But you can prevent many of these problems by having a comprehensive foot exam at least once a year, having your doctor check your feet at each office visit and taking good care of your feet at home.

To protect the health of your feet:

Check your feet every day. Look for blisters, cuts, bruises, cracked and peeling skin, redness, and swelling. Use a mirror or ask a friend or family member to help examine parts of your feet that are hard to see.
Keep your feet clean and dry. Wash your feet every day with lukewarm water and mild soap. Avoid soaking your feet. Dry your feet and between your toes carefully by blotting or patting with a soft towel.

Moisturize your feet thoroughly to prevent cracking. Avoid getting lotion between your toes, however, as this can encourage fungal growth.

Trim your toenails carefully. Cut your toenails straight across, and file the edges carefully so there are no sharp edges.
Wear clean, dry socks. Look for socks made of cotton or moisture-wicking fibers that don't have tight bands or thick seams.
Wear cushioned shoes that fit well. Always wear shoes or slippers to protect your feet from injury. Make sure that your shoes fit properly and allow your toes to move. A podiatrist (foot doctor) can teach you how to buy properly fitted shoes and to prevent problems such as corns and calluses.

If problems do occur, your doctor can help treat them to prevent more-serious conditions. Even small sores can quickly turn into severe infections if left untreated.

1 person found this helpful

Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients With Diabetes!

Dr. Amit Sinkar 87% (23 ratings)
DNB (Cardiology), DNB (General Medicine), MBBS
Cardiologist, Pune
Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients With Diabetes!

Peripheral arterial disease or commonly known as PAD is a common cardiovascular disease. Despite having the power to cause painful symptoms and severe health risks, it is overlooked by many. This particular arterial disease may lead to life-threatening consequences if left untreated for long. Read on to know more about the condition.

What is PAD?
PAD refers to the situation where in the peripheral arteries to the arms, head, stomach, and legs become narrow. Often referred to as the peripheral vascular disease, here, the arteries start to grow narrower due to the slow but constant buildup of fatty deposits on the artery walls. Though it can affect all the arteries in a person’s body, except those that supply blood to the heart, in the majority of cases, it affects the arteries in the leg.

What are the threats it poses?
PAD is indeed a life-threatening disease, as the blockages, it creates in the peripheral arteries prevent normal blood circulation to the different organs, legs, and brain. And when the blood flow is restricted, or the vital organs of the body fail to receive necessary blood flow, then the legs, brain and all the vital organs suffer severe damage. And when PAD continues to harm the blood flow for a long time, then it leads to tissue infection or tissue death, which is known as gangrene.

Additional health issues it causes
PAD also creates various other health concerns, such as atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease of fatty materials’ build up. In the case of atherosclerosis, the entire blood circulatory system gets damaged, including the arteries leading to the heart. The risk of blood clot build ups and vascular inflammation are also common additional threats posed by the fatty deposits.

Smoking is a common cause for PAD. Also, leg pain initially worsens with walking then present even at rest.

Probable symptoms
Depending on the part of the body that is affected, the PAD symptoms vary from one to another. However, painful cramping in the muscles of one’s legs is the most common symptom of this condition. The pain, originating in the legs often goes up to the muscles in the thighs or hips too. Except this, weakness or numbness in the legs, ulcers or open sores on the feet or legs, skin color changing into bluish or pale are some of the other symptoms of PAD.

Possible treatments
The peripheral arterial disease can be diagnosed easily, painlessly and straightforwardly under proper medical attention. Both prescribed medications and a lifestyle change are considered to be the best treatment for controlling PAD. Including a healthy diet and adopting a healthy lifestyle have often been successful in preventing PAD in its early stage.

The moment any signs or symptoms of PAD is noticed one should not be late in seeking immediate medical attention.

2193 people found this helpful

Peripheral Vascular Diseases: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Dr. Manjari Gupta 89% (10 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MD - Radiodiagnosis
Radiologist, Ghaziabad
Peripheral Vascular Diseases: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment

Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a circulation issue that affects the arteries and blood vessels outside of the brain and heart. PVD commonly strikes the arteries that supply blood to the arms, legs, and organs situated beneath the stomach. These are the arteries that are located away from the heart. They are known as peripheral vessels.

In PVD, the width of the arteries get limited. Narrowing is normally created by arteriosclerosis. Arteriosclerosis is a condition where plaque develops inside a vessel. It is additionally called 'solidifying of the arteries'. Plaque acts towards reducing the amount of blood and oxygen that is supplied to the arms and legs. As the plaque development advances, clumps may develop, which may further affect the vessel.

Types:

There are two main types of PVDs:

  1. Functional PVD: This doesn't include physical issues in the arteries. It causes accidental side effects. Typically,these fits happen suddenly.
  2. Organic PVD: This includes changes in the arteries structure. This sort of PVD causes irritation, tissue harm, and blockages.

The most well-known reasons for functional PVDs are as follows:

  • Emotional stress
  • Smoking
  • Cold temperatures
  • Operating Vibrating machinery

The common causes of such natural PVDs are given below:

The symptoms include the following:

Diagnosis:

Primary diagnosis is by color doppler of the affected limb. PVD can also be diagnosed using interventional radiology (IR).

IRis a sub-claim of radiology that gives an image-guided diagnosis, and if required, includes treatment of the organs as well.It has developed as a first-line treatment in the administration of PVD.

Advantages:

IR medications are for the most part less demanding for patients than surgery, since they include no surgical cut.They are less painful and have shorter stays at the hospital. By and large, the patients are discharged on the same day the procedure is done. This mainly includes angioplasty and stenting. The procedure is as follows:

  • Utilising imaging for direction, the interventional radiologist puts a catheter through the femoral artery in the crotch to the blocked arteries in the legs.
  • At that point, the interventional radiologist expands a balloon to open the arteries that is blocked.
  • Sometimes it is opened with a tiny metallic cylinder called astent.
  • This is a treatment that does not require surgery; only a scratch in the skin the extent of a pencil tip.

Alternative measure:

Angioplasty and stenting have totally replaced invasive surgical methods. Early trials have proven IR to be as successful as surgery for some blood vessel and artery impairments. Earlier, extensive clinical experience demonstrated that stenting and angioplasty are favoured as first-line treatments for more procedures all through the body .

Doctors as well as patients who have been through the same, believe that IR is much better for PVD than invasive surgery, since it reduces the risk of infection.

3499 people found this helpful

Heel Pain - All About It!

Dr. Mukesh Vyas 92% (617 ratings)
BPTh/BPT
Physiotherapist, Pune

Heel pain is a common problem in the body where the affected person experiences pain radiating from the heel bone. Heel pain usually progresses slowly over time, it is recommended to consult a medical professional, if heel pain turns severe. The pain tends to most severe after one has been inactive for some time such as after waking up in the morning.

Causes-
Heel pain is usually caused when tissues present in the bottom of the heel (plantar fascia) is damaged. These tissues connect the heel bone with the bones of the feet and help in absorbing shocks. Tears are formed in these tissues when they are damaged or when they get thicker. These tissues are at an increased risk of wear and tear for those who are over 45 years old. The risks also tend to increase if the person is obese or whose occupation requires standing for lengthy periods of time.
Among other causes of heel pain are heel bone fractures, fat pad atrophy (a condition where a layer of fat present under the heel bone is reduced) and bursitis (inflammation of the fluid-filled sacs present around the joints). Peripheral neuropathy is a condition where damage occurs in the peripheral nerves (that transmits signals between the central nervous system and the rest of the body), this can cause pain in the heel.

Symptoms-
The symptoms of heel pain include:

1. Experiencing pain while jogging or walking

2. A feeling of pins pricking the heels after waking up in the morning

3. Inability to bend the heel

4. Painful swelling

5. Pain in the heel accompanied by fever

Prevention and treatment-

Heel pain can be prevented by taking certain preventive measures such as restricting usage of high heeled shoes without proper support and stretching the heel regularly. Medications such as painkillers are used to treat symptoms of heel pain
Physiotherapy treatment - 
1. Some instructions have to follow 
2. Manual therapy 
3. Ift +ultrasound therapy 
4. Calf stretching 
5. Contras bath 
 

Peripheral Neuropathy - How To Avoid It?

D.N.B Neurosurgery
Neurologist, Ahmedabad
Peripheral Neuropathy - How To Avoid It?

The sensation of pain and numbness are quite common in patients suffering from high blood sugar. If you are suffering from nerve damage from high blood sugar, chances are you have diabetic peripheral neuropathy. The discomfort can affect your mood and overall quality of life. But with some easy to follow steps can help you keep peripheral neuropathy under control.

  1. Keep your blood sugar levels under control: Your first task is to manage your blood sugar levels under control and with the passage of time it will damage the peripheral nerves and pave the way for diabetic neuropathy. If you can keep your blood sugar levels within a healthy range, you will be able to reduce the risk of nerve damage by about 60 percent. You should talk to your doctor first since a rapid drop in the blood sugar levels can prove to be even worse.
  2. Get the right level of Vitamin D: Your skin functions by producing Vitamin D in response to sunlight and it is immensely helpful in shielding against nerve pain. It has been found people who have lower levels of this nutrient are more likely to suffer from more pain. In case it is hard to get the recommended daily intake from food only, you will have to take supplement pills.
  3. Keep away from smoking: We all know that smoking causes the blood vessels to constrict which hampers circulation. If you don’t quit smoking, your peripheral nerves may not be able to nutrient-rich blood which would make pain worse.
  4. Take a warm bath: Warm water is not just relaxing, it can also improve circulation all through the body. It can provide instant relief. But it is worthy of mention here that since diabetic neuropathy leads to loss of sensation, you should ensure that the water isn’t too hot before you jump in.
  5. Seek resort to over the counter medications: There is a host of painkillers available for easing mild to moderate ache stemming from diabetic neuropathy. These include ibuprofen, aspirin, naproxen and acetaminophen. But before taking any of these pills, you should consult with an expert who can choose the right medicine for you.
  6. Get up and move: Exercise can combat pain in a variety of ways. It helps in keeping blood sugar levels under control which, in turn, can hinder nerve damage. Workout increases blood flow to the extremities while also uplifting your mood. It will help you get rid of stress so that you can better deal with the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. In a study conducted by the University of Kansas, it was found that people who exercise regularly didn’t face any trouble in doing daily activities.
  7. Consider carpal tunnel surgeryWhen the patient is suffering from localized peripheral nerve compression that affects the hands, carpal tunnel surgery can be considered as a last resort to achieve pain relief, reduced incidence of ulceration, increased range of movement and balance, preservation of limbs and improved quality of life.

With these few tips, you will be able to manage the peripheral neuropathy better.

2958 people found this helpful

Peripheral Artery Disease - What Puts You At Risk?

MBBS, Diploma in Medical Radio Diagnosis (DMRD), MD
Radiologist, Mohali
Peripheral Artery Disease - What Puts You At Risk?

The circulatory system involving blood vessels and valves is quite an intricate networking system. Blood flow is maintained in separate channels controlled by valves. The vessels distant from the heart are known as peripheral arteries (and veins). Due to fatty deposits, the blood vessels narrow, and therefore their blood-carrying capacity reduces. This leads to reduced blood supply to the legs. The blood carries essential nutrients, and when the legs do not receive it, their function is affected. Read on to know more about this condition.

Peripheral artery disease: As noted above, peripheral artery disease or peripheral vascular disease is when the peripheral organs do not receive adequate blood supply. This could be either due to vascular structural abnormalities or more commonly due to atherosclerosis.

Symptoms: PVD or PAD is a chronic disease, and there are no immediate symptoms. The onset happens over a period of time, and symptoms include:

  1. Claudication (pain in the legs when walking)
  2. Leg cramping with muscle pain
  3. Cold extremities
  4. Shiny legs
  5. Reduced pulsation in the lower extremities
  6. Hair loss from the hands and feet
  7. Delayed healing of wounds in the lower extremities
  8. When it gets severe, there could even be pain at rest and it can disrupt sleep.

Risk factors:

  1. People with atherosclerosis
  2. Age over 70 years
  3. Obesity
  4. Male
  5. Smoking
  6. History of diabetes, hypertension, heart disease
  7. Family history

Complications: PAD reduces blood supply to the distant organs. Therefore, the limbs can have ischemia and also undergo death. It is common for sores to not heal due to the poor blood supply. When this condition continues for a prolonged period, then portions of the extremities could become dead due to lack of blood supply. This could also affect the brain and heart, causing stroke and heart attacks.

Treatment: Peripheral artery disease can be treated by the following measures:

  1. Manage symptoms with pain killers
  2. Reduce cholesterol
  3. Reduce blood pressure
  4. Control blood sugar levels
  5. Prevent blood clots
  6. Manage weight (diet and lifestyle changes)
  7. Angioplasty is a process where the blood vessel is kept open to ensure blood flow is adequate. A stent may also be placed in it to prevent it from closing again.
  8. If there is a clot blocking the blood flow in a particular vessel, an agent may be injected which can destroy the clot and open up the artery

Prevention:

  1. Stop smoking
  2. Exercise regularly
  3. Eat a healthy diet including fresh fruits and vegetables, reduce cholesterol
  4. Foot care (especially if diabetic) including wearing socks, cutting nails, foot care with a doctor, attending to calluses and bunions.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

3342 people found this helpful

Peripheral Arterial Disease - What Is The Aim Of The Treatment?

MBBS, MS - General Surgery, DNB Peripheral Vascular Surgery
Vascular Surgeon, Lucknow
Peripheral Arterial Disease - What Is The Aim Of The Treatment?

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) refers to the narrowing of blood vessels that in turn causes poor blood flow to the limbs. This is also known as peripheral vascular disease. The blood vessels of the legs are most susceptible to this condition. PAD is typically caused by a buildup of plaque in the blood vessels. This limits the amount of blood that can pass through the arteries. High cholesterol, blood pressure and smoking are all contributors to this condition.

Treatment for the Peripheral arterial disease aims at 

  • Relieving the symptoms of this condition and reducing the risk of a heart attack or stroke.
  • Lifestyle changes are the first aspect of treating this condition. If the patient smokes, it is imperative for them to stop doing so.
  • In addition, the patient must have a healthy, well-balanced diet and exercise regularly. The patient should limit the number of fats and carbohydrates being consumed and increase the number of vegetables and fruits in his or her diet.
  • This can help maintain a healthy body weight. In addition, cholesterol and blood pressure levels should also be maintained at normal levels.
  • Medication may be needed in some cases. Diabetics must also ensure that their blood sugar levels are maintained at healthy levels. In some cases, a cardiac rehabilitation program may be advised. This program educates the patient about the disease and helps them build healthy habits.
  • Lifestyle changes often need to be supplemented with medication. Medication may also be prescribed to lower the risk of a stroke or heart attack. If the patient suffers from high cholesterol levels, he or she may be prescribed medication to help lower the cholesterol levels.
  • Similarly, medication will be prescribed in cases of high blood pressure. Medication may also be prescribed to help prevent blood clots. If the lifestyle changes do not relieve the pain caused by PAD, medication may also be prescribed for the same.

In patients suffering from severe peripheral arterial disease, a bypass surgery or an angioplasty may be required. This surgery aims at opening out the narrowed arteries and rerouting blood around the blockages. In very rare cases of advanced PAD, a lack of blood flow can also cause the death of the tissue in the foot or leg. In such cases, the foot or leg will need to be amputated. This is usually seen only if the patient also suffers from diabetes.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

2916 people found this helpful

Role Of Physiotherapy In Peripheral Neuropathy!

Master of Physiotherapy (MPT-Neuro), Bachelor of physiotherapy(BPT)
Physiotherapist, Ahmedabad
Role Of Physiotherapy In Peripheral Neuropathy!

Peripheral neuropathy (PN) is damage to or disease affecting nerves, which may impair sensation, movement, gland or organ function, and affects other aspects of health, depending on the type of nerve affected. The treatment by a physical therapist helps in reducing symptoms and improves an individual’s quality of life. As the cause, type, and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy can vary, the approach to care also varies. Physical therapy is helpful in maintaining strength, mobility, and function. 

Strengthening exercises for peripheral neuropathy moderately improve muscle strength. Exercising can help, when done regularly. They further reduce the neuropathic pain and also helps in controlling the blood sugar levels.

Objectives of physiotherapy include:

  • Maintaining and improving functions via a range of motion through stretching.

  • Strengthening muscles which include exercising against increasing resistance, use of weights and isometric exercise.

  • Balance training helps in providing stability and prevents falls.

  • Braces or splints can be used to enhance balance and posture.

  • Splinting is used in the treatment of compression mononeuropathies, such as carpal tunnel syndrome.

Following recommendations and care are provided by physiotherapist:

  • Moderate intensity exercise- It helps to improve strength and physical function.

  • Never gliding activities- Includes exercises shown by a physiotherapist who will help you move and glide your nerves.

  • Balance and coordination activities - Your physiotherapist works on strategies to improve your balance and coordination. Improving balance and coordination helps to decrease your risk of falling and injuries that arise due to it. Balance exercises are a crucial part of the recovery of peripheral neuropathy. Balance training is important in overcoming the feeling of stiffness and unsteadiness, especially among elderly people.

  • Education – Your physiotherapist educates you on how to safely manage peripheral neuropathy. It mainly focuses on improving your safety, preventing further complications, and finding alternative ways to perform certain tasks.

  • Kinetic therapy in peripheral nerve injuries- It should not be started until the late stage of nerve regeneration when progressive strength return can be seen. After an injury to the nerve, physiotherapeutic methods are used to eliminate paresis and to restore normal function of muscles as well as to improve circulation.

  • Electrostimulation – It plays an important role in the treatment of various neuromuscular dysfunctions.

  • Magnetotherapy- It is used where a pulsed low-frequency magnetic field is applied. It has well-known effects on enhancing enzymatic activity, oxy-reductive processes and proper blood circulation resulting in better oxidation and conduction characteristics of regenerating peripheral nerves. It enhances the regeneration of nerve fibers.

  • Bio-laser stimulation- where low energy biostimulation lasers are used in palatial, continuous manner. Laser radiation can also be used to rejoin the nerve stumps.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

5225 people found this helpful

5 Common Vascular Disorders You Must Know!

MBBS, MS - General Surgery, MCh - Vascular Surgery
Vascular Surgeon, Bangalore
5 Common Vascular Disorders You Must Know!

Vascular disorders are disorders of the vessels in your body that carry either blood or waste products. The vascular system consists of the arteries (that carry blood away from the heart), veins (that carry blood to the heart) and lymph vessels (that carry waste products to be excreted from the body). The various diseases of the vascular or circulatory system are:

  1. Peripheral Artery Disease: Peripheral arteries carry blood to the various organs and tissues in the body. Accumulation of cholesterol and fat in the vessels narrow the pathway for the blood to flow. This can impair blood flow to the tissues in the body and cause complications. Various medications used to lower cholesterol and blood pressure can also be used for peripheral artery disease.
  2. Buerger's Disease: This disease causes obstructions in the veins and arteries in the legs. This can hamper blood supply in the toes and the feet. It causes pain and may require amputation in severe cases. Treatments for this disease include smoking cessation and medications to dilute blood vessels.
  3. Aneurysm: An aneurysm is swelling in the blood vessel walls; it usually occurs in the aorta. The artery walls become fragile and are placed under a lot of stress; this may lead to a sudden rupture of the aortic vessels. This disorder is usually treated by surgical procedures.
  4. Peripheral Venous Disease: Peripheral venous disease is characterized by damage to the valves that allows blood to flow in a single direction. Damaged valves can cause blood to flow backwards and therefore, accumulate. Treatments for this disorder are incorporating certain lifestyle habits such as quitting smoking and alcohol.
  5. Blood clots in the veins: Blood clots may occur in the veins present inside the muscles of the thighs and lower legs which lead to deep vein thrombosis. You may be prescribed anti-coagulants, also known as blood thinners, to treat this disorder.

Causes
People with diseases such diabetes, high blood pressure, or kidney failure can be more likely to have vessel problems. Working with vibrating tools, being in cold temperatures, and smoking can worsen vascular problems. Causes of vascular disorders usually fit into one of 5 groups:

  1. Traumatic, which occur after injury
  2. Compressive, which occur when the pipes flatten
  3. Occlusive, which occur when pipes are blocked
  4. Tumors (growths) or malformations (deformed, tangled pipes), which may or may not be present at birth
  5. Vessel spasms, which occur when abnormal control of vessels causes them to narrow

Symptoms
Symptoms of vascular disorders can include:

  1. Pain
  2. Abnormal color changes in the fingertips
  3. Ulcers or wounds that do not heal
  4. Hand problems when in cold temperatures or locations
  5. Numbness or tingling of the fingertips
  6. Swelling
  7. Cool or cold fingers and/or hands

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

1891 people found this helpful

Pinched Nerve - Ways You Can Deal With It!

MD, FIPM, CCEPC, Fellowship In Pain Management
Pain Management Specialist, Jaipur
Pinched Nerve - Ways You Can Deal With It!

A pinched nerve is a sensation that causes a lot of pain due to pressure on the nerve or some form of nerve damage that may have been caused due to an accident, sports injury, or even as a side effect of other chronic conditions like diabetes. In this condition, one experiences a sharp and shooting pain as soon as there is some movement of the area or pressure on the same.

A pinched nerve usually signifies damage rendered to a peripheral nerve which is usually to be found outside the spinal cord and the brain. Disc herniation and arthritis are also some conditions that may cause a pinched nerve in the affected area. This happens due to the pressure on the nerve which may lead to irritation in the protective layer of the same. This condition can make life quite painful. So here are a number of ways in which you can manage the pinched nerve.

  • Location and Cause: In order to treat the condition in a satisfactory manner without causing further pain, the doctor will diagnose the location and the cause of the pain. This will have a large bearing on the treatment method to be followed. If there is an injury at play, it is imperative to give ample rest to the area while the treatment is conducted.
  • Physiotherapy: One of the most preferred forms of long-term treatment for a pinched nerve includes physiotherapy, which will help in relaxing and exercising the muscles and joints of the area so that stiffness and pain do not set in. The right kind of physiotherapy will also include exercises that will help in building the core strength of the muscles and joints in the area so that one does not suffer from weakness and pain in the long run.
  • Splinting and Bracing: For conditions that have affected the feet or the wrists, like Carpels Tunnel, for example, it is imperative to wear a splint or a brace, especially at night. This will ensure that the patient does not move the area unnecessarily, as this could lead to even more pain for the patient. One may also have to learn how to switch the natural body positions and change them accordingly so that the affected areas can be given enough of rest. These will usually be recommended by the doctor and the physiotherapist.
  • Medication: Anti-inflammatory drugs may be taken in case of extreme pain. These should be taken after consultation with a doctor so that you only have the prescribed dose of a medicine that would suit you. Corticosteroids and painkillers are usually prescribed in such cases. Some of these medicines are also available in gel form for topical application, while others are for oral ingestion.

If above conservative treatment fails then we have to go for interventional pain management. Interventions can range from simple trigger point injection, inter lesional injections to more advanced rhizotomies, radio frequency ablation, neurolysis, etc.

4299 people found this helpful
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