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Egg/Embryo Donation Tips

Donor Egg / Donor Embryo

Dr. Richika Sahay Shukla 92% (808 ratings)
DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MBBS
IVF Specialist, Delhi
Donor Egg / Donor Embryo

Donor Egg/ Donor Embryo

If you’re over 40 or can no longer produce healthy eggs, donor eggs can help you carry and deliver a baby. This is also a good option if you’re at risk for passing a genetic disease such as Tay-Sachs disease or sickle cell anemia to your child.

Treatment: What to expect:

  • If you decide on an anonymous egg donor, you can find her through your fertility clinic. You’ll usually be able to choose based on her physical characteristics, ethnic background, educational record, and occupation. Most donors are between 21 and 29 years old and have undergone psychological, medical, and genetic screening. Ask how your clinic screens candidates ” some do less extensive tests and background checks than others. If you choose to use donor embryos, you can either pick unrelated egg and sperm donors or use a frozen embryo donated by a couple that had extras.

  • Once you pick a donor, both you and she will take birth control pills to get your reproductive cycles in sync ” she needs to ovulate when your uterine lining can support an embryo. She’ll also take a fertility drug to help her develop several mature eggs for fertilization, while you will receive estrogen and progesterone to prepare your uterus for pregnancy. Once her eggs are mature, your doctor will give her an anesthetic and remove her eggs from her ovaries by inserting a needle through her vaginal wall using an ultrasound for guidance.

  • From here on out, the procedure is just like that of in vitro fertilization (IVF). Your partner’s sperm or a donor’s sperm will be combined with your donor’s eggs in a dish in a laboratory. Two to five days later, each of the fertilized eggs will be a ball of cells called an embryo. Your doctor will insert two to four embryos into your uterus through your cervix using a thin catheter. Although it’s not a common practice, many experts say couples should consider transfer of a single embryo to avoid the risk of twins or triplets. Extra embryos, if there are any, may be frozen in case this cycle doesn’t succeed. If the treatment does succeed, an embryo will implant in your uterine wall and continue to grow into a baby. In about 40 percent of ART pregnancies using donor eggs, more than one embryo implants itself and women give birth to multiples

6 people found this helpful

Donor Egg/Donor Embryo

Dr. Richika Sahay Shukla 92% (808 ratings)
DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MBBS
IVF Specialist, Delhi
Donor Egg/Donor Embryo

Donor Egg/ Donor Embryo

If you’re over 40 or can no longer produce healthy eggs, donor eggs can help you carry and deliver a baby. This is also a good option if you’re at risk for passing a genetic disease such as Tay-Sachs disease or sickle cell anemia to your child.

Treatment: What to expect

  • If you decide on an anonymous egg donor, you can find her through your fertility clinic. You’ll usually be able to choose based on her physical characteristics, ethnic background, educational record, and occupation. Most donors are between 21 and 29 years old and have undergone psychological, medical, and genetic screening. Ask how your clinic screens candidates ” some do less extensive tests and background checks than others. If you choose to use donor embryos, you can either pick unrelated egg and sperm donors or use a frozen embryo donated by a couple that had extras.
  • Once you pick a donor, both you and she will take birth control pills to get your reproductive cycles in sync ” she needs to ovulate when your uterine lining can support an embryo. She’ll also take a fertility drug to help her develop several mature eggs for fertilization, while you will receive estrogen and progesterone to prepare your uterus for pregnancy. Once her eggs are mature, your doctor will give her an anesthetic and remove her eggs from her ovaries by inserting a needle through her vaginal wall using an ultrasound for guidance.
  • From here on out, the procedure is just like that of in vitro fertilization (IVF). Your partner’s sperm or a donor’s sperm will be combined with your donor’s eggs in a dish in a laboratory. Two to five days later, each of the fertilized eggs will be a ball of cells called an embryo. Your doctor will insert two to four embryos into your uterus through your cervix using a thin catheter. Although it’s not a common practice, many experts say couples should consider transfer of a single embryo to avoid the risk of twins or triplets. Extra embryos, if there are any, may be frozen in case this cycle doesn’t succeed. If the treatment does succeed, an embryo will implant in your uterine wall and continue to grow into a baby. In about 40 percent of ART pregnancies using donor eggs, more than one embryo implants itself and women give birth to multiples.

Frozen Embryo Transfer

Dr. Richika Sahay Shukla 92% (808 ratings)
DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MBBS
IVF Specialist, Delhi
Frozen Embryo Transfer

Frozen Embryo Transfer

Freezing Embryos

Any excess healthy embryos from the IVF process can be frozen, in case more than one treatment cycle is needed. Freezing embryos, also known as cryopreservation, takes place for some 60% of all patients having IVF treatment “ and frozen embryo transfers accounts for around 50% of all IVF births in our program.

Why do we freeze embryos?

Embryo freezing provides more opportunities for a pregnancy from each IVF stimulated cycle. For example, if a number of normal embryos are obtained in an IVF cycle, we might suggest transferring one or two of them and freezing the other four or five. This would generally allow further embryo transfers in later cycles without the need to undergo a full stimulated IVF cycle if pregnancy did not occur in the first cycle. If a baby is conceived in the stimulated IVF cycle then the frozen embryos can be used subsequently to try for another pregnancy without the need for further hormone stimulation

Embryo freezing gives more opportunities for a pregnancy for each hormone stimulation cycle and egg collection.

During a typical IVF cycle, we’ll be able to create more than one embryo, however there are serious risks associated with multiple pregnancies, so generally we won’t transfer more than one embryo at a time.

For example, if we manage to obtain two or three normal embryos (this does not always happen) we’ll usually recommend transferring one, and freezing the others. If you do not become pregnant in that first cycle, we can transfer another embryo.

This is called a Frozen Embryo Transfer (FET), and means you won’t have to undergo another cycle of hormone stimulation and egg collection.

Storing frozen embryos

When you go through an IVF treatment cycle any excess embryos will be stored where they will be kept frozen in cryostorage until you decide to either use, donate or discard them.

How does embryo freezing work?

Embryos can be frozen from Day 2 (four cell stage) to Day 5 (Blastocyst). They are placed in thin plastic straws, sealed at both ends, and labelled with your name and identification number.

They then go into a freezing machine, where the temperature rapidly drops to -150° Celsius. The straws are then placed in goblets, and put into tanks filled with liquid nitrogen, which keeps the temperature at -196° Celsius.

Success rates with frozen embryos

many of our births, over many years, have come from the transfer of frozen and thawed embryos. On average the success rate is about 30%, but this mainly depends on the age of the woman’s eggs when the embryos are frozen.

So, if you were to freeze your embryos in your first IVF cycle at the age of 38, and then use them when you’re 42, your fertility chance will be relative to that of a 38-year-old woman rather than a 42-year-old.

What to do with any remaining embryos?

Once you feel that your family is complete, and you have no further personal use for your frozen embryos, you may decide to donate them to another couple who are unable to conceive with their own embryos. Your specialist can discuss all your options with you

Freezing embryos for fertility preservation

If you or your partner is undergoing fertility treatment for a serious illness or cancer you might consider freezing embryos for future pregnancy attempts.

Embryo Freezing

Dr. Richika Sahay Shukla 92% (808 ratings)
DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MBBS
IVF Specialist, Delhi
Embryo Freezing

Embryo Freezing

Embryo freezing is a technique that is recommended when high-quality embryos remain after embryo transfer. These embryos remain frozen until the patient is ready to use them. If patients have completed their families, they have the option to donate these frozen embryos to research, another couple, or training; the embryos can also be discarded.

Embryo Freezing

Dr. Richika Sahay Shukla 92% (808 ratings)
DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MBBS
IVF Specialist, Delhi
Embryo Freezing

Embryo Freezing

Embryo freezing is a technique that is recommended when high-quality embryos remain after embryo transfer. These embryos remain frozen until the patient is ready to use them. If patients have completed their families, they have the option to donate these frozen embryos to research, another couple, or training; the embryos can also be discarded.

4 people found this helpful

All About Embryo Transfer

Dr. Rita Bakshi 88% (2898 ratings)
MBBS, DGO, MD, Fellowship in Gynae Oncology
Gynaecologist, Delhi
All About Embryo Transfer

After the eggs are collected and fertilised in the laboratory, the embryo transfer takes place. Usually and this entirely depends on your situation, about one or three embryos of the best quality are selected to be transferred to the womb. After introduction to the uterus, the egg attaches itself to the wall of the uterus for the pregnancy to come into effect. Embryo transfer is the last step in the IVF cycle.

Procedure:
The procedure chosen for transferring embryos usually depends on the clinic chosen. But most of them involve the following steps:

  1. The eggs take two or three days to fertilise. When they are ready, the embryos with the best quality are selected. These are then transferred to your uterus.
  2. A speculum is inserted into your vagina by the doctor. Then using ultrasound for guidance, a catheter is passed through the cervix. This catheter is used to pass down the embryos into the uterus.
  3. Your lifestyle after the transfer should be docile and cause you minimum stress.
  4. A pregnancy blood test will be given to you two weeks after the transfer. If the test comes out as positive, an ultrasound is scheduled after another two weeks.

Risks:
In the process of transferring the embryo, there are no significant risks involved. There might be problems during passing the embryos through the catheter, if you never have had a baby before or your cervix was not assessed before the IVF cycle was initiated.

Chances of Successful Pregnancy:
With age, female fertility declines. It helps if you are younger when using your own eggs. After a survey it was found that women:

  1. aged below 35 have 40.6% chance of success
  2. aged between 36-37 have 35.5% chance of success
  3. aged between 38-39 have 28.1% chance of success
  4. aged between 40-42 have 21.2% chance of success
  5. aged between 43-44 have 11.2% chance of success
  6. aged 45 and over have 3.4% chance of success. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Gynaecologist.
3494 people found this helpful

Embryo Adoption and Freezing

Dr. Richa Sharma 92% (216 ratings)
MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, MBBS, FNB Reproductive Medicine, MRCOG
IVF Specialist, Mumbai
Embryo Adoption and Freezing

This is the success story of adopting an embryo which was frozen for 24 years.

Its no Less than a miracle but it also proves that THERE IS ALWAYS A HOPE 

What we consider end may be a begining

Here via this platform we are sharing success story with our readers

The baby that was conceived just 18 months after its mother: Woman, 26, gives birth to baby girl from a donated embryo that was frozen for 24 YEARS - the longest ever Emma Wren, born on November 25 this year, was conceived in 1992 Her adoptive mother Tina Gibson, 26, was conceived in 1991 Tina married her husband Benjamin when she was 19 and he was 26 because he has cystic fibrosis (CF), a fatal disease with a life expectancy in the 30s Fertility is often an issue with CF so they decided they would adopt, and they fostered several children to prepare for itThen they heard they could adopt an embryo and have a pregnancy experience

The embryo was cryopreserved until March this year, making it 24 years frozen It is the longest time an embryo has been frozen, after one in Virginia which was frozen for 19 years and a few months Experts say this successful birth 'suggests the shelf life of an embryo could be infinite'  

HOW DOES EMBRYO DONATION WORK?

  •  Couples who go through IVF tend to have extra embryos leftover, which are frozen and stored for later use. Eventually, when families decide they don't want any more children, they have to decide what to do with the leftover frozen embryos.
  • IVF couples have a few options for their left over embryos:-
  • donate the embryos to research 
  • thaw them and let them die
  • keep them frozen donate them to a couple who can't conceive
2 people found this helpful

Factors Influencing Embryo Implantation!

Care Ivf 90% (83 ratings)
MD - Obstetrtics & Gynaecology, Advanced Infertility
IVF Specialist, Kolkata
Factors Influencing Embryo Implantation!

The concept of egg quality of a woman is derived from the belief that the embryo implantation probability is powerfully related to the age and ovarian reserve of the woman. Thus, it is regarded that the quality of the egg is almost synonymous with the chances of embryo implantation. Its quality cannot be assessed merely by looking at the egg or measuring its ability to receive the fertilization by sperm or simply observing the initial embryo division.

There are a few important factors that contribute to the success or failure of the embryo implantation and some of them are:

  1. Diminished ovarian reserve: A woman with an increased FSH level on the third day of the menses is regarded as having diminished reserve of ovary. This implies that her ovary is not competent in sending feedback signals to the pituitary gland and the body responds by producing an increased amount of FSH for stimulating the ovary. For more than 10 years, it has been found that in over thousands of fertility treatment cycles, women with an increased FSH level have a lower egg quality.
  2. Advanced age of maternity: Even though the FSH level is normal, the age of the mother who provides the eggs plays an important role to determine the quality of the egg. Quite like women with increased FSH levels, eggs obtained from women aged more than 40 years can have some problems at a later stage of fertilization. Normal FSH levels are not considered a reassuring factor, owing to the lower implantation rate in females aged over 45 years.
  3. Diminished quality of egg: With an increase in age, the capacity of the mitochondria in producing energy slowly decreases. The egg is linked to the circulation before ovulation, and it is linked again after the embryo implantation. But during the one week time ranging from ovulation to implantation, the egg and the resulting embryo are contained in the zona pellucida and function on the basis of mitochondrial energy supply. The older age of the woman doesn’t cause any problem at the initial stage of ovulation. Its fertilization and embryonic development are also normal. But soon, it runs out of energy and stops dividing before reaching the stage of implantation.

Therefore, it is important to have the eggs tested to find out any sort of chromosomal abnormality. In case the mother is deficient of producing high quality eggs, the best option is to have donor eggs. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a gynaecologist.

1897 people found this helpful

Sequential Embryo Transfer

Dr. Richika Sahay Shukla 92% (808 ratings)
DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MBBS
IVF Specialist, Delhi
Sequential Embryo Transfer

Sequential embryo transfer-(SET) is an improved method of increasing pregnancy rates and implantation rates in infertile couples.  According to the  American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), the average  pregnancy rate is about 20% for patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment.  Patients undergoing SET have a pregnancy rate of over 50%!     SET is the transfer of two groups of embryos in the same menstrual cycle of a woman undergoing IVF treatment for infertility.  One group of embryos-the best looking and fastest growing embryos are transferred to the uterus 2 or 3 days after the oocytes (human eggs) are collected from the ovary.  The second, more highly developed, group of embryos are transferred to the uterus a few days later-when at least one embryo has reached the expanded blastocyst stage-an advanced stage when an embryo is about to hatch from its shell called the Zona Pellucida  and attempts to implant in the lining of the uterus called the endometrium.  SET has an increased implantation rate ( embryos implanting from the total number of embryos).

2 people found this helpful

SET (Sequential Embryo Transfer)

Dr. Richika Sahay Shukla 92% (808 ratings)
DNB (Obstetrics and Gynecology), MBBS
IVF Specialist, Delhi
SET (Sequential Embryo Transfer)

SET (Sequential Embryo Transfer)

Sequential embryo transfer-(SET) is an improved method of increasing pregnancy rates and implantation rates in infertile couples.  According to the  American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), the average  pregnancy rate is about 20% for patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment.  Patients undergoing SET have a pregnancy rate of over 50%!     SET is the transfer of two groups of embryos in the same menstrual cycle of a woman undergoing IVF treatment for infertility. One group of embryos-the best looking and fastest growing embryos are transferred to the uterus 2 or 3 days after the oocytes (human eggs) are collected from the ovary.  The second, more highly developed, group of embryos are transferred to the uterus a few days later-when at least one embryo has reached the expanded blastocyst stage-an advanced stage when an embryo is about to hatch from its shell called the Zona Pellucida  and attempts to implant in the lining of the uterus called the endometrium.  SET has an increased implantation rate ( embryos implanting from the total number of embryos).

Not all patients have embryos that survive to the blastocyst stage. Embryos may have arrested development in the first few days after fertilization – some embryos just arrest-no matter what the laboratory conditions are- and some embryos just were not destined to become babies because of inherent problems-such as genetic defects. The window of implantation of  human embryos is between 7 to 10 days after ovulation.  After 10 days, if the embryo does not at least start to implant, the endometrial lining may start to fall apart and not be able to sustain the embryo. Therefore, any early stage embryos placed in the uterus on Day 2 or  3 must depend on the uterus for a few more days until they develop to the blastocyst stage. Only the blastocyst stage embryo can implant in the uterus.

We believe -

Embryos talk to the uterus!

SET may be better than just one transfer for many patients for many reasons: First,  embryos communicate with the uterus using hormones called cytokines.  The presence of these cytokines can help the uterus prepare for implantation.  The exact makeup of fluids in the oviduct and uterus of each patient may be impossible to determine.  Perhaps the embryo  can tell the uterus what it needs to implant and develop. The presence of one group of embryos on Day 3 may help the implantation of the second group of embryos by getting the uterus properly prepared.  SET also provides a better method of selecting the best of the extra embryos to transfer and decreases the need to cryopreserve (freeze) extra embryos that may not be survivors. Obviously, the ability to decide which embryos are the best increases the chance of implantation and pregnancy.  Blastocysts not transferred fresh can still be cryopreserved and thawed later for a frozen embryo transfer (FET).

1 person found this helpful
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