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Cushing Syndrome Health Feed

Know More About The Causes, Signs And Treatment Of Cushing 's Syndrome!

Know More About The Causes, Signs And Treatment Of Cushing 's Syndrome!

The adrenal glands are present above the kidneys (hence the name) and produce an important hormone known as cortisol. Cortisol is responsible for regulating multiple body functions, including controlling blood pressure, protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and anti-inflammatory response, and stress management.

Under natural circumstances, the body produces excessive cortisol in the following situations:
Physically stressing situations like illness, surgery, injury, pregnancy, etc.

  1. Emotionally stressed situations
  2. Alcoholism
  3. Athletic training
  4. Malnutrition
  5. Depression
  6. Panic disorders

Causes: Cushing’s syndrome is a group of symptoms that manifest when there is too much cortisol in the body. It is more common in women than men, in the age group of 25 to 40. Some of the common causes of Cushing’s syndrome are listed below:

  1. Consuming too much of prednisone (and other steroids) or for prolonged periods can cause Cushing’s syndrome. These are strong anti-inflammatory medications and are used in asthma, arthritis, lupus, transplants, etc., to control the body’s inflammation reaction. It is therefore advisable to use topical steroids than oral steroids or injections as their effects are more noticeable and severe.
  2. Adrenal gland tumors can cause excessive production of cortisol.
  3. Pituitary gland tumors or adenomas also can also cause excessive production of cortisol, leading to Cushing’s syndrome.

The first type is known as exogenous Cushing’s disease and the others are known as endogenous Cushing’s disease.
Signs and symptoms: Cushing’s disease produces characteristic features which are referred to as the Cushingoid appearance. These features include the following:

  1. A rounded, plump face with a pinkish hue
  2. A moon face, with fat deposits on the face
  3. A buffalo hump with fat deposits between the shoulders
  4. Stretch marks on the abdomen, thighs, and arms
  5. Weak muscles, especially in the hips and shoulder
  6. Significant weight gain
  7. Skin that gets thin and bruises easily
  8. Extreme tiredness
  9. High blood pressure
  10. High blood sugar
  11. Thin arms and legs
  12. Delayed healing of cuts and injuries
  13. Increased facial hair in women
  14. Menstrual disorders
  15. Reduced libido, infertility, and erectile dysfunction in men
  16. Emotional issues like depression, anxiety, irritability
  17. Increased thirst and urination
  18. Bone loss, and eventually fractures
  19. Affected bone growth in the developing years
  20. Increased susceptibility to infections

Complications: Untreated Cushing’s disease can lead to bone fractures, hypertension, full-blown infections, kidney stones, etc.

Treatment: This would depend on the cause. If you are on long-term steroids, the dose would need to be adjusted. This should always be done under medical supervision, as it requires constant adjustment. Underlying tumors (pituitary or adrenal) need to be diagnosed and treated. There are other hormones too which come into the picture and need to be monitored.

1981 people found this helpful

Cushing's Syndrome - Know Reasons Behind It!

Cushing's Syndrome  - Know Reasons Behind It!

Cushing’s syndrome occurs due to abnormally high levels of the hormone cortisol. This can happen for a variety of reasons. The most common cause is overuse of corticosteroid medications.

Causes:

Your adrenal glands produce cortisol. It helps with a number of your body’s functions, including:

  1. regulating blood pressure and the cardiovascular system

  2. reducing the immune system’s inflammatory response

  3. converting carbohydrates, fats, and proteins into energy

  4. balancing the effects of insulin

  5. responding to stress

Your body may produce high levels of cortisol for a variety of reasons, including:

  1. high-stress levels, including stress related to an acute illness, surgery, injury, or pregnancy, especially in the final trimester

  2. athletic training

  3. malnutrition

  4. alcoholism

  5. depression, panic disorders, or high levels of emotional stress

The most common cause of Cushing’s syndrome is the use of corticosteroid medications, such as prednisone, in high doses for a long period. High doses of injectable steroids for treatment of back pain can also cause this syndrome.

Other causes include:

  1. a pituitary gland tumor in which the pituitary gland releases too much adrenocorticotropic hormone, which is also known as Cushing’s disease

  2. ectopic ACTH syndrome, which causes tumors that usually occur in the lung, pancreas, thyroid, or thymus gland

  3. an adrenal gland abnormality or tumor

Symptoms of Cushing’s Syndrome:

The most common symptoms of this condition are:

  • weight gain
  • obesity
  • fatty deposits, especially in the midsection, the face and between the shoulders and the upper back (causing a buffalo hump)
  • purple stretch marks on the breasts, arms, abdomen, and thighs
  • thinning skin that bruises easily
  • skin injuries that are slow to heal
  • acne
  • fatigue
  • muscle weakness
  • increased thirst
  • increased urination
  • bone loss
  • depression
  • an increased incidence of infections

Women may also notice extra facial and body hair, as well as absent or irregular menstruation.

Men may also have:

Children with this condition are generally obese and have a slower rate of growth.

2791 people found this helpful

Causes And Treatment Of Cushing's Syndrome!

Causes And Treatment Of Cushing's Syndrome!

The adrenal glands are present above the kidneys (hence the name) and produces an important hormone known as cortisol. Cortisol is responsible for regulating multiple body functions, including controlling the blood pressure, protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and anti-inflammatory response, and stress management.

Under natural circumstances, the body produces excessive cortisol in the following situations:
Physically stressing situations like illness, surgery, injury, pregnancy, etc.

  1. Emotionally stressed situations
  2. Alcoholism
  3. Athletic training
  4. Malnutrition
  5. Depression
  6. Panic disorders

Causes: Cushing’s syndrome is a group of symptoms that manifest when there is too much cortisol in the body. It is more common in women than men, in the age group of 25 to 40. Some of the common causes for Cushing’s syndrome are listed below:

  1. Consuming too much of prednisone (and other steroids) or for prolonged periods can cause Cushing’s syndrome. These are strong anti-inflammatory medications and are used in asthma, arthritis, lupus, transplants, etc., to control the body’s inflammation reaction. It is therefore advisable to use topical steroids than oral steroids or injections as their effects are more noticeable and severe.
  2. Adrenal gland tumours can cause excessive production of cortisol.
  3. Pituitary gland tumours or adenomas also can also cause excessive production of cortisol, leading to Cushing’s syndrome.

The first type is known as exogenous Cushing’s disease and the others are known as endogenous Cushing’s disease.
Signs and symptoms: Cushing’s disease produces characteristic features which are referred to as the Cushingoid appearance. These features include the following:

  1. A rounded, plump face with a pinkish hue
  2. A moon face, with fat deposits on the face
  3. A buffalo hump with fat deposits between the shoulders
  4. Stretch marks on the abdomen, thighs, and arms
  5. Weak muscles, especially in the hips and shoulder
  6. Significant weight gain
  7. Skin that gets thin and bruises easily
  8. Extreme tiredness
  9. High blood pressure
  10. High blood sugar
  11. Thin arms and legs
  12. Delayed healing of cuts and injuries
  13. Increased facial hair in women
  14. Menstrual disorders
  15. Reduced libido, infertility, and erectile dysfunction in men
  16. Emotional issues like depression, anxiety, irritability
  17. Increased thirst and urination
  18. Bone loss, and eventually fractures
  19. Affected bone growth in the developing years
  20. Increased susceptibility to infections

Complications: Untreated Cushing’s disease can lead to bone fractures, hypertension, full-blown infections, kidney stones, etc.

Treatment: This would depend on the cause. If you are on long-term steroids, the dose would need to be adjusted. This should always be done under medical supervision, as it requires constant adjustment. Underlying tumours (pituitary or adrenal) need to be diagnosed and treated. There are other hormones too which come into the picture and need to be monitored.

3312 people found this helpful

Cushing Syndrome - How To Diagnose It?

Cushing Syndrome - How To Diagnose It?

Cushing syndrome or round face syndrome, as some like to call it, is a hormonal disorder that is relatively uncommon. It is all about the stress hormone called Cortisol and how it can throw off the body systems. Read on to know the causes and symptoms of this disorder. But first of all, let us know what exactly is the Cushing syndrome?

When an individual's body is exposed more to a particular hormone called Cortisol, he/she may develop a condition called as Cushing syndrome. This can lead to unusual and uncomfortable symptoms. However, this condition of hypercortisolism is completely curable and the patients can continue to lead a normal life. Cushing syndrome is more common in women than in men and occurs mostly between the age of 25 to 40.

Symptoms of cushing syndrome

  1. Excessive weight gain and obesity
  2. Fatty deposits that tend to accumulate in the midsection, face (causing moon facies) or between the shoulders and upper back causing a hump
  3. Fatigue and muscle weakness
  4. Thinning skin that is prone to bruises easily
  5. Purple stretch marks on the arms, thighs, abdomen and breast
  6. Cognitive dysfunction with increased anxiety, irritability and depression
  7. Women can experience extra facial and body hair with irregular or absent periods
  8. High blood pressure and high blood sugar levels
  9. Low sex drive and erectile dysfunction
  10. Weak bones and osteoporosis
  11. Children with this ailment tend to obese and experience a slow growth rate

Causes of Cushing Syndrome
As mentioned above the major cause of Cushing syndrome is the high production of Cortisol. This hormone is produced by the adrenal gland that sits on top of your kidneys. The prime reasons for the over-production of Cortisol can be:

  1. High-stress levels
  2. Malnutrition
  3. Alcoholism
  4. Depression, panic disorder and high levels of emotional stress
  5. Athletic training

Also, another prime cause of this syndrome is the use of corticosteroid medications, such as prednisone, in high doses for a long period. These prescriptions are often given for conditions of asthma, organ transplant, lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. A tumor in the pituitary gland that is located at the base of the brain or a tumor in the adrenal glands can also lead to excessive production of Cortisol, thereby leading to Cushing Syndrome.

Diagnosis and treatment
Diagnosis is done by your doctor to determine the cause of the excess production of the hormone. Tests can include:

  1. Blood Test or imaging scans
  2. Dexamethasone suppression test
  3. 24-hour urinary free cortisol test
  4. Late-night salivary cortisol level

Treatment will vary with the actual cause of the disorder. Medications to decrease cortisol levels or block them can be given.

2800 people found this helpful

Cushing's Syndrome - How To Identify It?

Cushing's Syndrome - How To Identify It?

The adrenal glands are present above the kidneys (hence the name) and produces an important hormone known as cortisol. Cortisol is responsible for regulating multiple body functions, including controlling the blood pressure, protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and anti-inflammatory response, and stress management.

Under natural circumstances, the body produces excessive cortisol in the following situations:

Physically stressing situations like illness, surgery, injury, pregnancy, etc.

  1. Emotionally stressed situations
  2. Alcoholism
  3. Athletic training
  4. Malnutrition
  5. Depression
  6. Panic disorders

Causes: Cushing’s syndrome is a group of symptoms that manifest when there is too much cortisol in the body. It is more common in women than men, in the age group of 25 to 40. Some of the common causes of Cushing’s syndrome are listed below:

  1. Consuming too much of prednisone (and other steroids) or for prolonged periods can cause Cushing’s syndrome. These are strong anti-inflammatory medications and are used in asthma, arthritis, lupus, transplants, etc., to control the body’s inflammation reaction. It is therefore advisable to use topical steroids than oral steroids or injections as their effects are more noticeable and severe.
  2. Adrenal gland tumours can cause excessive production of cortisol.
  3. Pituitary gland tumours or adenomas also can also cause excessive production of cortisol, leading to Cushing’s syndrome.

The first type is known as exogenous Cushing’s disease and the others are known as endogenous Cushing’s disease.

Signs and symptoms: Cushing’s disease produces characteristic features which are referred to as the Cushingoid appearance. These features include the following:

  1. A rounded, plump face with a pinkish hue
  2. A moon face, with fat deposits on the face
  3. A buffalo hump with fat deposits between the shoulders
  4. Stretch marks on the abdomen, thighs, and arms
  5. Weak muscles, especially in the hips and shoulder
  6. Significant weight gain
  7. Skin that gets thin and bruises easily
  8. Extreme tiredness
  9. High blood pressure
  10. High blood sugar
  11. Thin arms and legs
  12. Delayed healing of cuts and injuries
  13. Increased facial hair in women
  14. Menstrual disorders
  15. Reduced libido, infertility, and erectile dysfunction in men
  16. Emotional issues like depression, anxiety, irritability
  17. Increased thirst and urination
  18. Bone loss, and eventually fractures
  19. Affected bone growth in the developing years
  20. Increased susceptibility to infections

Complications: Untreated Cushing’s disease can lead to bone fractures, hypertension, full-blown infections, kidney stones, etc.

Treatment: This would depend on the cause. If you are on long-term steroids, the dose would need to be adjusted. This should always be done under medical supervision, as it requires constant adjustment. Underlying tumours (pituitary or adrenal) need to be diagnosed and treated. There are other hormones too which come into the picture and need to be monitored.

2516 people found this helpful

What Actually Causes Obesity?

What Actually Causes Obesity?

What Actually Causes Obesity? Popular misconceptions about weight gain: Stop the Patient Blame Game

Successful prevention or treatment of obesity is fraught with many difficulties, including challenges in having open patient-clinician conversations and overcoming stigma.

These difficulties are further heightened because obesity is often considered to have a simple cause, when in fact it is a complex disease with a multifactorial etiology.

Effective treatment of obesity requires a careful understanding of the facts and myths surrounding this disease and its various causes. Here, I will provide evidence-based explanations for the various causes of obesity as we examine some popular misconceptions.

Misconception 1) 'Food Causes Obesity'

To address this misconception, let's first consider the example of edema. Water balance is usually precisely controlled by the body through multiple hormones and mechanisms. Edema results from an impairment of the controls of water balance, not from drinking excessive amounts of water.

Similarly, the body has mechanisms to regulate energy intake and expenditure. The net result of these mechanisms could be a state of energy balance, negative energy balance, or positive energy balance, leading to maintenance, loss, or gain of weight, respectively.

Blaming food for causing obesity is like blaming water intake for edema or the glucose bolus for diabetes.

As declared by the American Medical Association and other professional organizations, such as the Obesity Society, obesity is a disease. The defect in energy balance regulation leading to excessive energy storage in the form of fat is the disease. Food does not cause that defect. Hence, food does not cause obesity.

But food allows obesity to be expressed, just like water allows the defect in heart or kidney functions to express edema, or as a load of glucose allows the detection of impaired glucose clearance in diagnosing diabetes.

Although obesity has many causes, as we'll discuss below, its current treatment involves creating an energy deficit by reducing food intake. The fact that reducing food intake may produce weight loss is often considered proof that obesity is caused by food. However, that does not demonstrate its role in causing obesity. Often, cause and treatment are not two sides of the same coin. Excessive exposure to UV radiation may contribute to skin cancer, but its treatment does not involve placing a person in a dark room, away from sunlight.

Misconception 2) 'Obesity Is a Choice'

A popular and simplistic assumption is that energy balance is completely under volitional control, which stems from the observation that individuals control their food intake and physical activity. However, the numerous controls up- and downstream that collectively determine energy balance is ignored.

There are numerous physiologic factors beyond volitional control that influence energy balance and keep energy storage within a reasonable range. Such nonvolitional controls may explain why some individuals eat seemingly huge amounts of food but have lean body weight.

Misconception 3) 'Calories In, Calories Out'

A popular misconception is that weight gain can be predicted using simple math of calories: If you gain 1 lb, you have eaten 3500 calories more than your requirement.

The dominance of genetic over environmental influence on body weight was also demonstrated in a study that showed a strong link between the body weights of adopted children and their biological parents, but not at all with their adoptive parents. These studies indicate a stronger influence of genetics on determining body weight than food or related habits of a household.

Furthermore, the body has mechanisms to resist changes in body energy stores, which can offset mathematical expectations based on calorie intake calculations. Leibel and colleagues showed that bodies that were overfed resisted weight gain by increasing metabolic rate.

Alternatively, on a weight loss diet, metabolic rate was decreased and weight loss was resisted. These studies suggest that mechanisms beyond a person's voluntary control regulate energy stores and can make it easier or harder for different individuals to gain weight.

Misconception 4) It's Just a Lack of Willpower

If we were asked to reduce the rate of breathing to 10 times per minute, we would certainly be able to comply. The critical question is, for how long?

Some individuals may harbor a gut microbe composition that is conducive to greater calorie extraction and weight gain, or some may have less brown fat, which may result in reduced utilization of calories.

If energy balance is influenced by impairments in the brain, satiety and hunger hormones, other hormones and enzymes, gut microbes, or the amount of brown adipose tissue, lack of willpower cannot be solely to blame for energy surplus.

If we were asked to reduce the rate of breathing to 10 times per minute instead of the usual 16-18, we would certainly be able to comply. The critical question is, for how long?

Similarly, it is a tall order to expect a person to volitionally eat substantially less than what the person's brain, gut, and physiology are asking for, for months and years on end. This is not an issue of willpower for only a select few; it is unrealistic and unsustainable for most individuals.

Misconception 4) 'Who Cares About Why? Just Eat Less.'

The word "cancer" encompasses many different conditions, with etiologies as varied as smoking, UV light exposure, or viral infection, depending on the cancer type. Similarly, the multiple etiologies of obesity indicate that it is a collection of diseases, better referred to as "obesities."

Cancer treatment depends on the type of cancer. Similarly, "obesities" require that the various causes and contributors are identified for effective treatment.

Current obesity treatments include diet and lifestyle management, some pharmacotherapy, and bariatric surgery on a limited scale. These are blanket treatment approaches regardless of the cause. If the individual causes of obesity were to be correctly identified, treatment could be directed to the specific causes, which may be more effective than current approaches.

the example in obesity treatment would be the discovery and use of leptin for weight loss. Most people with obesity are resistant to leptin action and have excess leptin as a result. Some individuals are born without any leptin. These cases typically present as kids with a very high degree of obesity.

Their obesity is not due to excess TV watching or eating junk food, as popularly believed. This type of obesity develops because leptin is absent to provide the usual feedback to the brain about energy status. Hence, the brain fails to take corrective action in response to accumulating fat.

The treatment of obesity due to leptin deficiency is not diet or lifestyle modification but simply leptin replacement injections.

Another example is the treatment of obesity that results from proopiomelanocortin (POMC) deficiency in the brain. Melanocyte-stimulating hormone is produced from POMC and conveys the anorexic effect of leptin via the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4). POMC deficiency leads to impaired stimulation of MC4, resulting in greater energy intake. This condition is effectively treated with an MC4 agonist drug.

Deficiency of leptin or POMC is obesities of genetic origin that are successfully treated with a cause-specific approach. Other examples of contributors to obesity that informs treatment include endocrine disorders such as hypothyroidism, Cushing syndrome, or inadequate or poor sleep quality. These few examples underscore the need for further research to uncover additional causes of obesity and how they could be effectively treated.

Successful prevention or treatment of obesity is fraught with many difficulties, including challenges in having open patient-clinician conversations and overcoming stigma.

These difficulties are further heightened because obesity is often considered to have a simple cause, when in fact it is a complex disease with a multifactorial etiology.

Effective treatment of obesity requires a careful understanding of the facts and myths surrounding this disease and its various causes.

Bariatric surgery can be a powerful tool for weight loss in Very severe cases

 

7 people found this helpful

Cushing's Syndrome - Understanding The Complications Related To It!

Cushing's Syndrome - Understanding The Complications Related To It!

The adrenal glands are present above the kidneys (hence the name) and produces an important hormone known as cortisol. Cortisol is responsible for regulating multiple body functions, including controlling the blood pressure, protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and anti-inflammatory response, and stress management.

Under natural circumstances, the body produces excessive cortisol in the following situations:
Physically stressing situations like illness, surgery, injury, pregnancy, etc.

  1. Emotionally stressed situations
  2. Alcoholism
  3. Athletic training
  4. Malnutrition
  5. Depression
  6. Panic disorders

Causes: Cushing’s syndrome is a group of symptoms that manifest when there is too much cortisol in the body. It is more common in women than men, in the age group of 25 to 40. Some of the common causes for Cushing’s syndrome are listed below:

  1. Consuming too much of prednisone (and other steroids) or for prolonged periods can cause Cushing’s syndrome. These are strong anti-inflammatory medications and are used in asthma, arthritis, lupus, transplants, etc., to control the body’s inflammation reaction. It is therefore advisable to use topical steroids than oral steroids or injections as their effects are more noticeable and severe.
  2. Adrenal gland tumours can cause excessive production of cortisol.
  3. Pituitary gland tumours or adenomas also can also cause excessive production of cortisol, leading to Cushing’s syndrome.

The first type is known as exogenous Cushing’s disease and the others are known as endogenous Cushing’s disease.
Signs and symptoms: Cushing’s disease produces characteristic features which are referred to as the Cushingoid appearance. These features include the following:

  1. A rounded, plump face with a pinkish hue
  2. A moon face, with fat deposits on the face
  3. A buffalo hump with fat deposits between the shoulders
  4. Stretch marks on the abdomen, thighs, and arms
  5. Weak muscles, especially in the hips and shoulder
  6. Significant weight gain
  7. Skin that gets thin and bruises easily
  8. Extreme tiredness
  9. High blood pressure
  10. High blood sugar
  11. Thin arms and legs
  12. Delayed healing of cuts and injuries
  13. Increased facial hair in women
  14. Menstrual disorders
  15. Reduced libido, infertility, and erectile dysfunction in men
  16. Emotional issues like depression, anxiety, irritability
  17. Increased thirst and urination
  18. Bone loss, and eventually fractures
  19. Affected bone growth in the developing years
  20. Increased susceptibility to infections

Complications: Untreated Cushing’s disease can lead to bone fractures, hypertension, full-blown infections, kidney stones, etc.

Treatment: This would depend on the cause. If you are on long-term steroids, the dose would need to be adjusted. This should always be done under medical supervision, as it requires constant adjustment. Underlying tumours (pituitary or adrenal) need to be diagnosed and treated. There are other hormones too which come into the picture and need to be monitored.

3194 people found this helpful

Cushing's Syndrome - Signs To Know Is You Are Suffering From It!

Cushing's Syndrome - Signs To Know Is You Are Suffering From It!

The adrenal glands are present above the kidneys (hence the name) and produces an important hormone known as cortisol. Cortisol is responsible for regulating multiple body functions, including controlling the blood pressure, protein and carbohydrate metabolism, and anti-inflammatory response, and stress management.

Under natural circumstances, the body produces excessive cortisol in the following situations:
Physically stressing situations like illness, surgery, injury, pregnancy, etc.

  1. Emotionally stressed situations
  2. Alcoholism
  3. Athletic training
  4. Malnutrition
  5. Depression
  6. Panic disorders

Causes: Cushing’s syndrome is a group of symptoms that manifest when there is too much cortisol in the body. It is more common in women than men, in the age group of 25 to 40. Some of the common causes for Cushing’s syndrome are listed below:

  1. Consuming too much of prednisone (and other steroids) or for prolonged periods can cause Cushing’s syndrome. These are strong anti-inflammatory medications and are used in asthmaarthritislupus, transplants, etc., to control the body’s inflammation reaction. It is therefore advisable to use topical steroids than oral steroids or injections as their effects are more noticeable and severe.
  2. Adrenal gland tumours can cause excessive production of cortisol.
  3. Pituitary gland tumours or adenomas also can also cause excessive production of cortisol, leading to Cushing’s syndrome.

The first type is known as exogenous Cushing’s disease and the others are known as endogenous Cushing’s disease.
Signs and symptoms: Cushing’s disease produces characteristic features which are referred to as the Cushingoid appearance. These features include the following:

  1. A rounded, plump face with a pinkish hue
  2. A moon face, with fat deposits on the face
  3. A buffalo hump with fat deposits between the shoulders
  4. Stretch marks on the abdomen, thighs, and arms
  5. Weak muscles, especially in the hips and shoulder
  6. Significant weight gain
  7. Skin that gets thin and bruises easily
  8. Extreme tiredness
  9. High blood pressure
  10. High blood sugar
  11. Thin arms and legs
  12. Delayed healing of cuts and injuries
  13. Increased facial hair in women
  14. Menstrual disorders
  15. Reduced libido, infertility, and erectile dysfunction in men
  16. Emotional issues like depression, anxiety, irritability
  17. Increased thirst and urination
  18. Bone loss, and eventually fractures
  19. Affected bone growth in the developing years
  20. Increased susceptibility to infections

Complications: Untreated Cushing’s disease can lead to bone fractures, hypertension, full-blown infections, kidney stones, etc.

Treatment: This would depend on the cause. If you are on long-term steroids, the dose would need to be adjusted. This should always be done under medical supervision, as it requires constant adjustment. Underlying tumours (pituitary or adrenal) need to be diagnosed and treated. There are other hormones too which come into the picture and need to be monitored.

4181 people found this helpful

How To Cure Hormonal Disorders?

How To Cure Hormonal Disorders?

What is Hormonal Disorder?

Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. You may have a hormone disorder when your hormone levels are too high or too low. 

Symptoms of Hormonal Disorders-

Causes of Hormonal Disorders-

  • Hereditary factors
  • Nutritional deficiencies
  • Infections
  • Trigger thyroid disease
  • Use of alcohol
  • The use of illegal steroids

Risk factors of Hormonal Disorders-

  • The use of prescribed medications
  • Low body fat
  • Chronic diseases
  • Ovarian cysts.

Complications of Hormonal Disorders-

  • Loss of sexual desire
  • Dangerous pregnancy
  • Swelling in the breast
  • Change in facial and body hair
  • Weakness
  • Personality transformation

Diagnosis of Hormonal Disorders-

Diagnosis of hormonal disorders is done through the observation of the noticeable signs and symptoms, or through blood and tissue testing. 

Precautions & Prevention of Hormonal Disorders-

  • Avoid contracting infections such as fungal infections
  • Avoiding close contact with individuals who have contagious illnesses
  • Regularly wash the hands with soap and water
  • Avoid triggers of stress

Treatment of Hormonal Disorders

  • Homeopathic Treatment of Hormonal Disorders
  • Acupuncture Treatment of Hormonal Disorders
  • Psychotherapy Treatment of Hormonal Disorders
  • Conventional / Allopathic Treatment of Hormonal Disorders
  • Surgical Treatment of Hormonal Disorders
  • Dietary & Herbal Treatment of Hormonal Disorders
  • Other Treatment of Hormonal Disorders

Homeopathic Treatment of Hormonal Disorders-

Homeopathy is safe, natural and effective treatment of hormonal disorders. Homeopathic medicines are very effective in treating hormonal imbalances like hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, cushing syndrome, prolactinemia etc. It relieves complaints and helps to correct the constitution of a person. Following are some homeopathic medicines for treatment of hormonal disorders.

  • Calcarea carb
  • Natrium mur
  • Kalium carb
  • Thyroidinum
  • Iodum
  • Pulsatilla 

Acupuncture and Acupressure Treatment of Hormonal Disorders-

Acupuncture therapy is effective in correcting many hormonal disorders which can lead to obesity, reduced fertility or infertility, breast tenderness, acne, digestive disturbances and problems of sexual function. 

Psychotherapy and Hypnotherapy Treatment of Hormonal Disorders-

Psychotherapy and hypnotherapy treatment of hormonal disorders include sessions that teach individuals how to manage their time, stress, and anger. 

Conventional / Allopathic Treatment of Hormonal Disorders-

Conventional or allopathic medicine aims to reduce the hormonal disorders symptoms. Allopathic medicines depend upon the type of hormonal imbalance

Surgical Treatment of Hormonal Disorders-

There are different types of surgeries for different types of hormonal disorders. Each surgery depends upon the type of hormonal disorder. After surgery hormone levels return to normal. 

Dietary & Herbal Treatment of Hormonal Disorders-

  • Eat fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Eat diet high in fiber
  • Avoid white flour products and have breads and cereals
  • Avoid fried foods and junk food 

Other Treatment of Hormonal Disorders-

Music therapy, relaxation therapy, and yoga may help relieve symptoms of hormonal disorders such as stress. 

5 people found this helpful

Cushing's Syndrome - Know Symptoms Of It!

Cushing's Syndrome - Know Symptoms Of It!

Cushing’s syndrome occurs due to abnormally high levels of the hormone cortisol. This can happen for a variety of reasons. The most common cause is overuse of corticosteroid medications.

Causes:

Your adrenal glands produce cortisol. It helps with a number of your body’s functions, including:

  1. regulating blood pressure and the cardiovascular system

  2. reducing the immune system’s inflammatory response

  3. converting carbohydrates, fats, and proteins into energy

  4. balancing the effects of insulin

  5. responding to stress

Your body may produce high levels of cortisol for a variety of reasons, including:

  1. high stress levels, including stress related to an acute illness, surgery, injury, or pregnancy, especially in the final trimester

  2. athletic training

  3. malnutrition

  4. alcoholism

  5. depression, panic disorders, or high levels of emotional stress

The most common cause of Cushing’s syndrome is the use of corticosteroid medications, such as prednisone, in high doses for a long period. High doses of injectable steroids for treatment of back pain can also cause this syndrome.

Other causes include:

  1. a pituitary gland tumor in which the pituitary gland releases too much adrenocorticotropic hormone, which is also known as Cushing’s disease

  2. ectopic ACTH syndrome, which causes tumors that usually occur in the lung, pancreas, thyroid, or thymus gland

  3. an adrenal gland abnormality or tumor

Symptoms of Cushing’s Syndrome:

The most common symptoms of this condition are:

  • weight gain
  • obesity
  • fatty deposits, especially in the midsection, the face and between the shoulders and the upper back (causing a buffalo hump)
  • purple stretch marks on the breasts, arms, abdomen, and thighs
  • thinning skin that bruises easily
  • skin injuries that are slow to heal
  • acne
  • fatigue
  • muscle weakness
  • increased thirst
  • increased urination
  • bone loss
  • depression
  • an increased incidence of infections

Women may also notice extra facial and body hair, as well as absent or irregular menstruation.

Men may also have:

Children with this condition are generally obese and have a slower rate of growth.

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