Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}

Computerised Traction Tips

ROLE OF TRACTION IN LOW BACKACHE

Dr. Namit Singhal 90% (26 ratings)
MCH Neuro Surgery, MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MS - General Surgery
Neurosurgeon, Agra
ROLE OF TRACTION IN LOW BACKACHE


Patients who continue with the recommended exercises had significantly lower disability scores than those who did not continue with the exercises and were put on traction. Pain and global improvement were also better in the exercise group. In conclusion, no specific effect of traction on standard physical therapy was observed in most of study groups. We suggest focusing on back education and exercise therapy in the management of patients suffering from this chronic condition.

3 people found this helpful

Does Traction Help a Bent Penis?

Dr. Vinod Raina 88% (5801 ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
Does Traction Help a Bent Penis?

The appearance of a guy's penis can be a matter of great concern to a man. Every guy wants to sport a handsome penis, and so men may spend time admiring or worrying over their manhood. A frequent concern occurs when the penis is curved; a certain amount of curvature may be considered attractive, but when a man has a severely bent penis, it may cause anguish. And beyond the physical appearance, a really bent penis can be a penis health issue. When the curvature is extreme enough to cause pain or interfere with sexual functioning, steps may need to be taken to address the issue. One strategy is using a traction device to help lessen the curvature. But is this a medically sound option?

Peyronie's disease

Often when a bent penis is severely affected, a man may be diagnosed with Peyronie's disease. Named after the doctor who first described the condition, Peyronie's disease is generally caused when the penis experiences trauma or injury. This may be a direct blow to the penis, as when a baseball traveling at great speed hits the groin, or it may come about from the penis being handled too roughly during sex. In the latter, the condition is likely to result from repeated instances of rough handling.

When the penis is injured, a small amount of scar tissue, called plaque, forms as part of the healing process. If the injury is large enough, or if repeated trauma causes more layers of scar tissue to form on top of each other, it can result in curving. This occurs because the plaque lacks the elasticity of regular penis tissue. So when the penis becomes erect, the damaged side of the penis can't stretch as far as the other side, causing the penis to bend.

In some cases, this causes pain when the penis becomes erect. It also may bring about erectile dysfunction. If the curvature is severe enough, it may preclude the possibility of intercourse.

Treatment

In a small number of cases (usually of the milder variety), Peyronie's goes away without treatment. And in some cases, the degree of curvature is not severe enough to require treatment.

But in other cases, a doctor may recommend a number of treatments. These range from oral medications to injections to surgery. One option sometimes recommended is traction.

Traction

  • Most treatments for a severely bent penis haven't undergone rigorous clinical trials, so assessing their effectiveness is difficult. But at least one trial involving penile traction therapy showed promise. Involving 55 men with Peyronie's disease, the study found an average decrease in curvature of 20 degrees; plaque disappeared in 48% of the patients. And the rate of those unable to achieve penetration fell from 62% to 20%.
  • For the study, the men used a traction device, often called a penis extender. The device attaches at the base of the penis and again underneath the glans. It is then extended, pulling and stretching the penis. The men in the study were instructed to wear the device for 6-9 hours each day for 6 months.
  • Based on the results of this study, it seems that traction may be an option for some men with a very bent penis. However, there are drawbacks; not all men responded to the treatment, and there is some degree of pain and discomfort associated with penis stretching.
  • Men with Peyronie's should definitely consult with a doctor to see if they should consider any kind of treatment.
  • Whether or not using traction to treat a bent penis, men should be sure to use a superior penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) to keep the penis in good health. One with vitamin C is especially urged, as this vitamin helps produce collagen, which in turn supports penile elasticity. Also welcome in a crème is L-arginine, which can help restore penis sensitivity after rough handling of the organ.
3 people found this helpful

Does Traction Help a Bent Penis?

Dr. Vinod Raina 88% (5801 ratings)
MD - General Medicine
Sexologist, Delhi
Does Traction Help a Bent Penis?

The appearance of a guy's penis can be a matter of great concern to a man. Every guy wants to sport a handsome penis, and so men may spend time admiring or worrying over their manhood. A frequent concern occurs when the penis is curved; a certain amount of curvature may be considered attractive, but when a man has a severely bent penis, it may cause anguish. And beyond the physical appearance, a really bent penis can be a penis health issue. When the curvature is extreme enough to cause pain or interfere with sexual functioning, steps may need to be taken to address the issue. One strategy is using a traction device to help lessen the curvature. But is this a medically sound option?

Peyronie's disease

Often when a bent penis is severely affected, a man may be diagnosed with Peyronie's disease. Named after the doctor who first described the condition, Peyronie's disease is generally caused when the penis experiences trauma or injury. This may be a direct blow to the penis, as when a baseball traveling at great speed hits the groin, or it may come about from the penis being handled too roughly during sex. In the latter, the condition is likely to result from repeated instances of rough handling.

When the penis is injured, a small amount of scar tissue, called plaque, forms as part of the healing process. If the injury is large enough, or if repeated trauma causes more layers of scar tissue to form on top of each other, it can result in curving. This occurs because the plaque lacks the elasticity of regular penis tissue. So when the penis becomes erect, the damaged side of the penis can't stretch as far as the other side, causing the penis to bend.

In some cases, this causes pain when the penis becomes erect. It also may bring about erectile dysfunction. If the curvature is severe enough, it may preclude the possibility of intercourse.

Treatment

In a small number of cases (usually of the milder variety), Peyronie's goes away without treatment. And in some cases, the degree of curvature is not severe enough to require treatment.

But in other cases, a doctor may recommend a number of treatments. These range from oral medications to injections to surgery. One option sometimes recommended is traction.

Traction

Most treatments for a severely bent penis haven't undergone rigorous clinical trials, so assessing their effectiveness is difficult. But at least one trial involving penile traction therapy showed promise. Involving 55 men with Peyronie's disease, the study found an average decrease in curvature of 20 degrees; plaque disappeared in 48% of the patients. And the rate of those unable to achieve penetration fell from 62% to 20%.

For the study, the men used a traction device, often called a penis extender. The device attaches at the base of the penis and again underneath the glans. It is then extended, pulling and stretching the penis. The men in the study were instructed to wear the device for 6-9 hours each day for 6 months.

Based on the results of this study, it seems that traction may be an option for some men with a very bent penis. However, there are drawbacks; not all men responded to the treatment, and there is some degree of pain and discomfort associated with penis stretching.

Men with Peyronie's should definitely consult with a doctor to see if they should consider any kind of treatment.

Whether or not using traction to treat a bent penis, men should be sure to use a superior penis health crème (health professionals recommend Man1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin) to keep the penis in good health. One with vitamin C is especially urged, as this vitamin helps produce collagen, which in turn supports penile elasticity. Also welcome in a crème is L-arginine, which can help restore penis sensitivity after rough handling of the organ.

9 people found this helpful

How Radiological Evaluation Can Help In Case Of Hip Replacement?

Dr. Sudhir Pudi 90% (80 ratings)
DNB (Radio Diagnosis), MBBS
Radiologist, Hyderabad
How Radiological Evaluation Can Help In Case Of Hip Replacement?

Radiology is a special branch of medical science that uses various techniques of imaging for the diagnosis and the treatment of several types of diseases in the body. The different types of imaging techniques used in radiology are X-rays, Computerised Tomographic scan (CT Scan), ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and nuclear medicine which includes Positron Emission Tomography(PET).

Role played in evaluating hip replacement
Hip replacement surgeries have become extremely common in the recent times, and radiological evaluation remains the mainstay of the overall hip replacement procedure. Thus, the role played by radiology is quite significant in such situations. All the specific anatomical landmarks and the measurements are used to make sure the placement is perfect during the hip replacement surgery. Radiological imaging helps in the assessment of the following conditions that are as discussed below.

The length of leg
The inequality in the length of the two legs is prevalent after a hip replacement surgery which can create a great deal of discomfort and inconvenience to the patients. A greater difference in the length of the two legs increases the chances of dislocation, and this is a situation where radiological evaluation plays a crucial role. With the help of radiological imaging, the length of the legs can be made almost equal.

The horizontal center of rotation

In this case, horizontal center of rotation helps in the assessment of the acetabular component of the prosthesis. This is calculated by the measurement of the distance between the center of the head of the femur and the acetabular teardrop. This distance should be bilaterally equal, and it is just not possible without the help of the imaging techniques of radiology.

Acetabular inclination
The acetabular inclination is the angle formed between the face of the cup and the transverse axis. If the angle is less, then it results in a stable hip, but the abduction is limited. On the other hand, if the angle increases then there are high chances of dislocation of the hip. Thus, with the help of radiological evaluation, proper and effective angular inclination is given which is optimum for the patient.

The stem positioning of the femur
The main aim of the stem positioning of the femur in a hip replacement surgery is placing the stem in a position which is neutral within the shaft. To get a proper idea of the positioning, the imaging techniques are of utmost importance which cannot be achieved perfectly without the imaging.

Thus, the crucial role the different techniques of radiological imaging plays during the overall procedure of a hip replacement surgery can be perceived. With the use of the different imaging techniques, the results obtained are closer to perfection. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Radiologist.

5562 people found this helpful

Hip Replacement - Why Get A Radiological Evaluation Done?

Dr. Manjari Gupta 85% (10 ratings)
MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, MD - Radiodiagnosis
Radiologist, Ghaziabad
Hip Replacement - Why Get A Radiological Evaluation Done?

Radiology is a special branch of medical science that uses various techniques of imaging for the diagnosis and the treatment of several types of diseases in the body. The different types of imaging techniques used in radiology are X-rays, Computerised Tomographic scan (CT Scan), ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and nuclear medicine which includes Positron Emission Tomography(PET).

Role played in evaluating hip replacement
Hip replacement surgeries have become extremely common in the recent times, and radiological evaluation remains the mainstay of the overall hip replacement procedure. Thus, the role played by radiology is quite significant in such situations. All the specific anatomical landmarks and the measurements are used to make sure the placement is perfect during the hip replacement surgery. Radiological imaging helps in the assessment of the following conditions that are as discussed below.

The length of leg
The inequality in the length of the two legs is prevalent after a hip replacement surgery which can create a great deal of discomfort and inconvenience to the patients. A greater difference in the length of the two legs increases the chances of dislocation, and this is a situation where radiological evaluation plays a crucial role. With the help of radiological imaging, the length of the legs can be made almost equal.


The horizontal center of rotation
In this case, horizontal center of rotation helps in the assessment of the acetabular component of the prosthesis. This is calculated by the measurement of the distance between the center of the head of the femur and the acetabular teardrop. This distance should be bilaterally equal, and it is just not possible without the help of the imaging techniques of radiology.

Acetabular inclination
The acetabular inclination is the angle formed between the face of the cup and the transverse axis. If the angle is less, then it results in a stable hip, but the abduction is limited. On the other hand, if the angle increases then there are high chances of dislocation of the hip. Thus, with the help of radiological evaluation, proper and effective angular inclination is given which is optimum for the patient.

The stem positioning of the femur
The main aim of the stem positioning of the femur in a hip replacement surgery is placing the stem in a position which is neutral within the shaft. To get a proper idea of the positioning, the imaging techniques are of utmost importance which cannot be achieved perfectly without the imaging.

Thus, the crucial role the different techniques of radiological imaging plays during the overall procedure of a hip replacement surgery can be perceived. With the use of the different imaging techniques, the results obtained are closer to perfection. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

 

3252 people found this helpful

Aortic Valve Stenosis: Tests and Diagnosis

Dr. Sunil Beniwal 90% (55 ratings)
MBBS, MD - Internal Medicine, DM - Cardiology
Cardiologist, Jaipur
Aortic Valve Stenosis: Tests and Diagnosis

Aortic valve stenosis is a heart condition in which the valve to the biggest artery- the one which provides oxygen-rich blood to our body, called aorta, is narrowed. This prevents the valve from opening fully, obstructing the blood flow from your heart into your body.

When the aortic valve doesn’t open, your heart needs to work harder to pump blood to your body making the heart muscle weak. If left undiagnosed aortic stenosis is fatal.

Symptoms

These symptoms should spur you on to seek medical care right away:

  1. Chest pain or tightness

  2. Feeling faint with exertion

  3. Shortness of breath

  4. Fatigue after increased activity

  5. Heart palpitations — rapid, fluttering heartbeat

  6. Heart murmur

The disorder doesn’t produce symptoms right away and is usually diagnosed during routine physical exams when your doctor listens to your heart with a stethoscope. He usually hears a heart murmur resulting from turbulent blood flow through the narrowed aortic valve.

Diagnostic Tests

There are other ways to diagnose aortic valve stenosis and gauge the severity of the problem, like:

  1. Echocardiogram – This produces an image of your heart using sound. It is the primary test to diagnose a heart valve problem. Sound waves are directed at your heart here and these bounce off your heart and are processed electronically to provide images of your heart. This test helps your doctor check diagnose aortic valve stenosis and its severity plus chalk out a treatment plan.

  2. Electrocardiogram (ECG) –  In this test, patches with electrodes are attached to your chest to measure electrical impulses given out by your heart. These are then recorded as waves on a monitor and printed on paper. Though this can’t diagnose aortic stenosis directly, it can tell you that the left ventricle in your heart is thickened which normally happens due to aortic stenosis.

  3. Chest X-ray This allows the doctor to see the shape and size of your heart directly. If the left ventricle is thickened, it points to aortic stenosis. It also helps doctor check the lungs. Aortic stenosis leads to fluid and blood in the lungs, causing congestion.

  4. Exercise Tests – Exercise is used to increase your heart rate and make your heart work harder. This test is done to see how your heart reacts to exertion. Exercise test may be contraindicated in severe AS. MRI and X ray not much helpful to diagnose AS. 

  5. Computerised Tomography (CT) Scan –  This means a series of X-rays to create images of your heart and observes the heart valves. CT is helpful in planning for nonsurgical valve replacement. Cardiac Catheterisation is usually needed prior to surgery.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) –  This uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create images of your heart and valves.

Once aortic valve stenosis is confirmed, you may have to go in for monitoring or heart valve surgery according to your doctor’s advice. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can consult a Cardiologist.

2764 people found this helpful

Aortic Valve Stenosis - Are CT Scan & MRI Beneficial In Diagnosing It?

Multi-Speciality Clinic
Cardiologist, Hyderabad
Aortic Valve Stenosis - Are CT Scan & MRI Beneficial In Diagnosing It?

Aortic valve stenosis is a heart condition in which the valve to the biggest artery- the one which provides oxygen-rich blood to our body, called aorta, is narrowed. This prevents the valve from opening fully, obstructing the blood flow from your heart into your body.

When the aortic valve doesn’t open, your heart needs to work harder to pump blood to your body making the heart muscle weak. If left undiagnosed aortic stenosis is fatal.

Symptoms

These symptoms should spur you on to seek medical care right away:

  1. Chest pain or tightness

  2. Feeling faint with exertion

  3. Shortness of breath

  4. Fatigue after increased activity

  5. Heart palpitations — rapid, fluttering heartbeat

  6. Heart murmur

The disorder doesn’t produce symptoms right away and is usually diagnosed during routine physical exams when your doctor listens to your heart with a stethoscope. He usually hears a heart murmur resulting from turbulent blood flow through the narrowed aortic valve.

Diagnostic Tests

There are other ways to diagnose aortic valve stenosis and gauge the severity of the problem, like:

  1. Echocardiogram – This produces an image of your heart using sound. It is the primary test to diagnose a heart valve problem. Sound waves are directed at your heart here and these bounce off your heart and are processed electronically to provide images of your heart. This test helps your doctor check diagnose aortic valve stenosis and its severity plus chalk out a treatment plan.

  2. Electrocardiogram (ECG) –  In this test, patches with electrodes are attached to your chest to measure electrical impulses given out by your heart. These are then recorded as waves on a monitor and printed on paper. Though this can’t diagnose aortic stenosis directly, it can tell you that the left ventricle in your heart is thickened which normally happens due to aortic stenosis.

  3. Chest X-ray This allows the doctor to see the shape and size of your heart directly. If the left ventricle is thickened, it points to aortic stenosis. It also helps doctor check the lungs. Aortic stenosis leads to fluid and blood in the lungs, causing congestion.

  4. Exercise Tests – Exercise is used to increase your heart rate and make your heart work harder. This test is done to see how your heart reacts to exertion.

  5. Computerised Tomography (CT) Scan –  This means a series of X-rays to create images of your heart and observes the heart valves. It is also used to measure the size of aorta and the aortic valve.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) –  This uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create images of your heart and valves.

In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

4118 people found this helpful

6 Ways You Can Diagnose Aortic Valve Stenosis!

Dr. Krish Vaidya 93% (3893 ratings)
MD-Physician, Fellow. Cardiology, Fellow. Diabetology
Cardiologist, Vadodara
6 Ways You Can Diagnose Aortic Valve Stenosis!

Aortic valve stenosis is a heart condition in which the valve to the biggest artery- the one which provides oxygen-rich blood to our body, called aorta, is narrowed. This prevents the valve from opening fully, obstructing the blood flow from your heart into your body.

When the aortic valve doesn’t open, your heart needs to work harder to pump blood to your body making the heart muscle weak. If left undiagnosed aortic stenosis is fatal.

Symptoms

These symptoms should spur you on to seek medical care right away:

  1. Chest pain or tightness

  2. Feeling faint with exertion

  3. Shortness of breath

  4. Fatigue after increased activity

  5. Heart palpitations — rapid, fluttering heartbeat

  6. Heart murmur

The disorder doesn’t produce symptoms right away and is usually diagnosed during routine physical exams when your doctor listens to your heart with a stethoscope. He usually hears a heart murmur resulting from turbulent blood flow through the narrowed aortic valve.

Diagnostic Tests

There are other ways to diagnose aortic valve stenosis and gauge the severity of the problem, like:

  1. Echocardiogram – This produces an image of your heart using sound. It is the primary test to diagnose a heart valve problem. Sound waves are directed at your heart here and these bounce off your heart and are processed electronically to provide images of your heart. This test helps your doctor check diagnose aortic valve stenosis and its severity plus chalk out a treatment plan.

  2. Electrocardiogram (ECG) –  In this test, patches with electrodes are attached to your chest to measure electrical impulses given out by your heart. These are then recorded as waves on a monitor and printed on paper. Though this can’t diagnose aortic stenosis directly, it can tell you that the left ventricle in your heart is thickened which normally happens due to aortic stenosis.

  3. Chest X-ray This allows the doctor to see the shape and size of your heart directly. If the left ventricle is thickened, it points to aortic stenosis. It also helps doctor check the lungs. Aortic stenosis leads to fluid and blood in the lungs, causing congestion.

  4. Exercise Tests – Exercise is used to increase your heart rate and make your heart work harder. This test is done to see how your heart reacts to exertion.

  5. Computerised Tomography (CT) Scan –  This means a series of X-rays to create images of your heart and observes the heart valves. It is also used to measure the size of aorta and the aortic valve.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) –  This uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create images of your heart and valves.

Once aortic valve stenosis is confirmed, you may have to go in for monitoring or heart valve surgery according to your doctor’s advice. In case you have a concern or query you can always consult an expert & get answers to your questions!

1858 people found this helpful

How To Diagnose Aortic Valve Stenosis?

Dr. Nishith Chandra 91% (695 ratings)
DM Cardiology
Cardiologist, Delhi
How To Diagnose Aortic Valve Stenosis?

Aortic valve stenosis is a heart condition in which the valve to the biggest artery- the one which provides oxygen-rich blood to our body, called aorta, is narrowed. This prevents the valve from opening fully, obstructing the blood flow from your heart into your body.

When the aortic valve doesn’t open, your heart needs to work harder to pump blood to your body making the heart muscle weak. If left undiagnosed aortic stenosis is fatal.

Symptoms

These symptoms should spur you on to seek medical care right away:

  1. Chest pain or tightness

  2. Feeling faint with exertion

  3. Shortness of breath

  4. Fatigue after increased activity

  5. Heart palpitations — rapid, fluttering heartbeat

  6. Heart murmur

The disorder doesn’t produce symptoms right away and is usually diagnosed during routine physical exams when your doctor listens to your heart with a stethoscope. He usually hears a heart murmur resulting from turbulent blood flow through the narrowed aortic valve.

Diagnostic Tests

There are other ways to diagnose aortic valve stenosis and gauge the severity of the problem, like:

  1. Echocardiogram – This produces an image of your heart using sound. It is the primary test to diagnose a heart valve problem. Sound waves are directed at your heart here and these bounce off your heart and are processed electronically to provide images of your heart. This test helps your doctor check diagnose aortic valve stenosis and its severity plus chalk out a treatment plan.

  2. Electrocardiogram (ECG) –  In this test, patches with electrodes are attached to your chest to measure electrical impulses given out by your heart. These are then recorded as waves on a monitor and printed on paper. Though this can’t diagnose aortic stenosis directly, it can tell you that the left ventricle in your heart is thickened which normally happens due to aortic stenosis.

  3. Chest X-ray This allows the doctor to see the shape and size of your heart directly. If the left ventricle is thickened, it points to aortic stenosis. It also helps doctor check the lungs. Aortic stenosis leads to fluid and blood in the lungs, causing congestion.

  4. Exercise Tests – Exercise is used to increase your heart rate and make your heart work harder. This test is done to see how your heart reacts to exertion.

  5. Computerised Tomography (CT) Scan –  This means a series of X-rays to create images of your heart and observes the heart valves. It is also used to measure the size of aorta and the aortic valve.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) –  This uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create images of your heart and valves.

Once aortic valve stenosis is confirmed, you may have to go in for monitoring or heart valve surgery according to your doctor’s advice.

3589 people found this helpful

Aortic Valve Stenosis - Diagnostic Tests That Can Be Of Help!

Dr. Birinder Singh Thind 89% (52 ratings)
Ph.D Cardiology, M.D, Higher secondary
Cardiologist, Noida
Aortic Valve Stenosis - Diagnostic Tests That Can Be Of Help!

Aortic valve stenosis is a heart condition in which the valve to the biggest artery- the one which provides oxygen-rich blood to our body, called aorta, is narrowed. This prevents the valve from opening fully, obstructing the blood flow from your heart into your body.

When the aortic valve doesn’t open, your heart needs to work harder to pump blood to your body making the heart muscle weak. If left undiagnosed aortic stenosis is fatal.

Symptoms

These symptoms should spur you on to seek medical care right away:

  1. Chest pain or tightness

  2. Feeling faint with exertion

  3. Shortness of breath

  4. Fatigue after increased activity

  5. Heart palpitations — rapid, fluttering heartbeat

  6. Heart murmur

The disorder doesn’t produce symptoms right away and is usually diagnosed during routine physical exams when your doctor listens to your heart with a stethoscope. He usually hears a heart murmur resulting from turbulent blood flow through the narrowed aortic valve.

Diagnostic Tests

There are other ways to diagnose aortic valve stenosis and gauge the severity of the problem, like:

  1. Echocardiogram – This produces an image of your heart using sound. It is the primary test to diagnose a heart valve problem. Sound waves are directed at your heart here and these bounce off your heart and are processed electronically to provide images of your heart. This test helps your doctor check diagnose aortic valve stenosis and its severity plus chalk out a treatment plan.

  2. Electrocardiogram (ECG) –  In this test, patches with electrodes are attached to your chest to measure electrical impulses given out by your heart. These are then recorded as waves on a monitor and printed on paper. Though this can’t diagnose aortic stenosis directly, it can tell you that the left ventricle in your heart is thickened which normally happens due to aortic stenosis.

  3. Chest X-ray This allows the doctor to see the shape and size of your heart directly. If the left ventricle is thickened, it points to aortic stenosis. It also helps doctor check the lungs. Aortic stenosis leads to fluid and blood in the lungs, causing congestion.

  4. Exercise Tests – Exercise is used to increase your heart rate and make your heart work harder. This test is done to see how your heart reacts to exertion.

  5. Computerised Tomography (CT) Scan –  This means a series of X-rays to create images of your heart and observes the heart valves. It is also used to measure the size of aorta and the aortic valve.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) –  This uses powerful magnets and radio waves to create images of your heart and valves.

Once aortic valve stenosis is confirmed, you may have to go in for monitoring or heart valve surgery according to your doctor’s advice.

3289 people found this helpful
Icon

Book appointment with top doctors for Computerised Traction treatment

View fees, clinic timings and reviews