Common Specialities
{{speciality.keyWord}}
Common Issues
{{issue.keyWord}}
Common Treatments
{{treatment.keyWord}}

Doctor For Kidney Related Problems

I am 47 year old man. I am having problem of gall bladder stone (15 mm and 19 mm. I am also having so much weakness and stomach pull. So what can I do for the treatment and I want to ask these problem I am because of stones or anything else? ✕ health check 360 how severe is your back pain? Select an option health issues vary person to person take help from the best doctors find doctors near you book appointment with top doctors ask a free question get answers from doctors with 24 hours book lab test @ 50% off free doctor consultation related questions for 2 years 6th child is it bad for her to drink 1 1/2 lit milk per. 3 hi how to cure gallbladder stone problem I have been diagnosed and. 20 hello doctor, I 'm 21 years old ,i'm suffering fatty liver grade ii. 3 gall bladder stones - during my health check up, gall bladder stone. 3 I am 22 year old. I have a stone of 18 mm in gall bladder some time. 25 sir, in my father left kidney there are two stones 3-4 mm. And 5 mm. 4 view all related questions related health tips gallstones 3970 gallstones kidney stones - how homeopathy can help you? 4773 kidney stones - how homeopathy can help you? Symptoms and treatments of gallbladder stones 3754 symptoms and treatments of gallbladder stones symptoms, causes and ayurvedic treatment of gallstones 3742 symptoms, causes and ayurvedic treatment of gallstones what causes gallstones? When should you consider undergoing surgery? 4269 what causes gallstones? When should you consider undergoing surgery? Stones in urinary tract - 4 particular reasons behind it! 3194 stones in urinary tract - 4 particular reasons behind it! view more health tips icon book appointment with top doctors for bladder stones treatment view fees, clinic timings and reviews ask a free question get free multiple opinions from doctors enter question for you or someone else. E.g. My left eye is red and swollen. Posted anonymously treatment enquiry get treatment costs, find best hospitals/clinics and know other details enter treatment/service related lab tests: bladder cancer urothelial carcinoma marker profile test mri scan - pelvis screening test x-ray kub plain test home > bladder stones > health feed > questions > I am 47 year old man. I am having problem of gall bladder. Related issues dissolution of cholesterol rich gallstones infectious diseases treatment calculus gallbladder disease hereditary folate malabsorption gallstones related specialities proctologist in gwalior podiatrist in gwalior gastroenterologist in gwalior homeopath in gwalior related topics living healthy - man living healthy - woman search doctors doctors by city doctors by city locality doctors by speciality doctors by city speciality read health articles health wiki health tips index health questions index health quizzes index health topics index medicines index ailment index lab test details index about us contact us careers mobile apps blog terms of use privacy policy editorial policy press © 2018 Lybrate, inc. All rights reserved.

I am 47 year old man. I am having problem of gall bladder stone (15 mm and 19 mm. I am also having so much weakness a...
Surgery is the gold standard for gall stone disease. Kindly get it done before it gets complicated. Stomach pull seems to be due to gall stones. Generalised weakness may be due to low food intake or feeling of unwell ness due to known disease (gall stone in your case) in the body.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

Doctor can I use himalaya gokshura. If yes and it's safe suggest me dosage and when I had take.

Doctor can I use himalaya gokshura. If yes and it's safe suggest me dosage and when I had take.
Gokshur has many uses like for urinogenital system or for male reproductive system related issues in calculus of kidney or for testosterone levels, prostate etc. May I know your purpose? I ll guide you how to take and with what vehicle (anypaana) to take. Pl consult.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

This is for my mother she is around 48 years. She facing this problem from a long time. She stays fit in day and eat whatever she like but after dinner she starts feeling suffocation, gas, indigestion, vomiting and loose motion this start happening each week we went to a doctor he does some testing including ultrasound, some blood test and one kidney test, in ultrasound there is a cyst in stomach of 43 *46 inch. He said you should went to a gynecologist and immediately treat this one, we went to a gynecologist she said everything is okay we will have some test as I don't believe on these reports it's was not from a stable hospital. So first we wait for your monthly periods meanwhile you have to take medicines then we test and hopefully, it got dissolved meanwhile. Now yesterday we again went for ultrasound now there are 5 kidney stones in gall bladder and no cyst she is saying it got dissolved by the medicines. I am not understanding the main problem of my mom is related to indigestion at night but neither csyt or kidney stones seems route cause of this. The symptoms she is having might not lead to a big disease which cause a problem. Second is cyst got dissolve of that much of size in a week? Is there any way to treat stones without surgery?

This is for my mother she is around 48 years. She facing this problem from a long time. She stays fit in day and eat ...
Its not clear stones are in gall bladder or kidney. Also, cyst is where in the kidney or stomach as you have mentioned or in uterus or ovary. Also, the size you mentioned is wrong. It can not be that big (in inches). Treatment can be suggested after the correct information. For indigestion do this 1. Don't take tea empty stomach. Eat something like a banana (if you are not diabetic) or any seasonal fruit or soaked almonds and a glass of water first thing in the morning (within 10 mins of waking up). No only biscuits or rusk will not do. 2. Don't overeat 3. Take your breakfast every day. Don't skip it. 4. Have light meals every 2 hours (in addition to your breakfast, lunch n dinner) e.g. Nariyal paani, chaach, a handful of dry fruits, a handful of peanuts, any fresh n seasonal fruit, a cup of curd/milk etc 5. Finish your dinner at least 2 hours before going to sleep. 6. Maintain active life style7. Avoid fast foods, spicy n fried foods, carbonated beverages 8. Take a lot of green vegetables n fruit. 9. Drink lot of water. 10. Everyday preferably sleep on same time exercise in the form of yoga, cycling, swimming, gym, walking etc. For more details, you can consult me.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

My uric acid level is 7.3 and creatinine is 1.02. My both feet and angel is swelling kindly suggest.

My uric acid level is 7.3 and creatinine is 1.02. My both feet and angel is swelling kindly suggest.
Most men with normal kidney function have approximately 0.6 to 1.2 milligrams/deciliters (mg/dl) of creatinine. Normal uric acid levels are 2.4-6.0 mg/dl (female) and 3.4-7.0 mg/dl (male) as you can see you have a slightly elevated uric acid level which is causing the swelling of feet and angel if you have an elevated blood uric acid level, and your healthcare provider thinks that you may be at risk for gout, kidney stones, try to eat a low purine diet. Foods that are high in purine include: all organ meats (such as liver), meat extracts and gravy yeasts, and yeast extracts (such as beer, and alcoholic beverages) asparagus, spinach, beans, peas, lentils, oatmeal, cauliflower and mushrooms foods that are low in purine include: refined cereals - breads, pasta, flour, tapioca, cakes milk and milk products, eggs lettuce, tomatoes, green vegetables cream soups without meat stock water, fruit juice, carbonated drinks peanut butter, fruits and nuts keep well hydrated, drinking 2 to 3 liters of water per day, unless you were told otherwise. Take all of your medications for hyperuricemia as directed avoid caffeine and alcohol, as these can contribute to problems with uric acid and hyperuricemia. Avoid medications, such as thiazide diuretics (hydrochlortiazide), and loop diuretics (such as furosemide or lasix®). Also, drugs such as niacin, and low doses of aspirin (less than 3 grams per day) can aggravate uric acid levels. Do not take these medications, or aspirin unless a healthcare provider who knows your condition told you. If you experience symptoms or side effects, especially if severe, be sure to discuss them with your health care team. They can prescribe medications and/or offer other suggestions that are effective in managing such problems. Drugs or treatments that may be prescribed by your doctor: your doctor or healthcare provider may prescribe medications if you have a high blood uric acid levels. These may include: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (nsaid) agents and tylenol®- such as naproxen sodium and ibuprofen may provide relief of gout-related pain. Gout may be a result of a high uric acid level. If you are to avoid nsaid drugs, because of your type of cancer or chemotherapy you are receiving, acetaminophen (tylenol () up to 4000 mg per day (two extra-strength tablets every 6 hours) may help. It is important not to exceed the recommended daily dose of tylenol, as it may cause liver damage. Discuss this with your healthcare provider. Uricosuric drugs: these drugs work by blocking the reabsorption of urate, which can prevent uric acid crystals from being deposited into your tissues. Examples of uricosuric drugs include probenecid, and sulfinpyrazone. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors - such as allopurinol, will prevent gout. However, it may cause your symptoms of gout to be worse if it is taken during an episode of painful joint inflammation. Allopurinol may also be given to you, if you have a certain form of leukemia or lymphoma, to prevent complications from chemotherapy and tumor lysis syndrome - and not necessarily to prevent gout. With high levels of uric acid in your blood, as a result of your disease, the uric acid will collect and form crystals in your kidneys. This may occur during chemotherapy, and may cause your kidneys to fail. When to contact your doctor or health care provider: localized joint pain (especially in a toe or finger joint), that is red and inflamed. Shortness of breath, chest pain or discomfort; should be evaluated immediately. Feeling your heart beat rapidly (palpitations). Bleeding that does not stop after a few minutes. Any new rashes on your skin - especially if you have started any new medications.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have been taking amtas m 50 for almost a year. Recently bp shot to 165/115 and my doctor prescribed sartel am and rouvastin to be taken at night. Is that ok?

I have been taking amtas m 50 for almost a year. Recently bp shot to 165/115 and my doctor prescribed sartel am and r...
Rosuvastatin is a medicine for dyslipidemia or in simple words a medicine for cholesterol related problems and not for increased blood pressure. Amtas m contains amlodipine and metoprolol which now has been changed to sartel am- which is amlodipine and telmisartan. There is a need for detailed evaluation of the cause of your recent increase in blood pressure. You need to be tested for kidney problems, renal arterial doppler, kidney function tests, thyroid profile. If after a detailed evaluation no correctable cause of your recent increase in blood pressure is made out, the increase is attributed to age. Take the medicines as prescribed also make lifestyle and behavioural changes like using the staircase rather than lifts, regular exercise at least a morning walk for 30 minutes, decreased intake of packaged and junk foods, decreased intake of salt and items which contain large amounts of salt like pickle etc. Stop smoking or alcohol if any. This will certainly help you to keep your blood pressures under control.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am 67 years old with BP readings 145/95. With good physics & not any apparent problem, with every day regular exercise. does it need medication? Which Bp (systolic/dailestic) is more harmful. Can ayurveda medicines cure BP completely?

I am 67 years old with BP readings 145/95. With good physics & not any apparent problem, with every day regular exerc...
if anything can help with your BP is lifestyle changes like taking more fibres and avoiding oily greasy food. also avoiding a lot of carbohydrates help. with age our vessels become stiff because of coatings around our arteries, which is mainly because if cholesterol. keep taking medicines with good diet and exercises. if you have any kidneys or liver related issues avoid ayurvedic medicines as sometimes they can make it worse. if you're perfectly alright you can consult a good ayurvedic doctor for the treatment. they can control your problem like any other medicines but if it can cure it or not that can't be said confidently.
1 person found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I have a 14 mm gallstone and I also took homeopathic medicine for 3 months but the size only increased.

I have a 14 mm gallstone and I also took homeopathic medicine for 3 months but the size only increased.
Hello sir please go through my article What is the gallbladder? — The gallbladder is a small, pear-shaped organ that is tucked under your liver (figure 1). It stores bile, a fluid that helps the body break down fat. What are gallstones? — Gallstones are small stones that form inside the gallbladder. They can be tiny specks or get as big as the whole gallbladder, which can be up to 6 inches long. Normally, the gallbladder fills with bile in between meals. Then, when you eat fatty foods, the gallbladder empties the bile into the intestine. Sometimes, though, gallstones clog the gallbladder and keep it from draining. Other times, gallstones just irritate the gallbladder. If the gallstones are pushed out of the gallbladder, they can keep the liver or pancreas from draining. What are the symptoms of gallstones? — In most cases, gallstones do not cause any symptoms. When they do cause symptoms, gallstones can cause: ●Belly pain – Often on the right side just under the rib cage or in the middle top portion of the belly ●Pain in the back or right shoulder ●Nausea and vomiting If you know that you have gallstones but have no symptoms, you probably will not need treatment. But if you start having symptoms, you should get treated. The symptoms can come and go, but they often get worse over time. Are gallstones serious? — Not usually. In rare cases they can lead to serious problems, including: ●Jaundice, a condition that turns your skin and eyes yellow ●Infection of the gallbladder ●Tears in the gallbladder, which can lead to death ●Inflammation of the pancreas (the pancreas is an organ that makes hormones and juices involved in food breakdown) Is there a test for gallstones? — Yes, doctors can find out if you have gallstones by doing an imaging test, such as an ultrasound. An ultrasound is a painless test that uses sound waves to create a picture of your gallbladder. Even if tests show that you have gallstones, that does not mean they are causing symptoms. Your doctor might need to do other tests to make sure your stones and your symptoms are related. How are gallstones treated? — People with gallstones generally have 3 treatment options. They can have: ●No treatment – This option is best for people with no symptoms. If they start having symptoms, they can think about treatment then. ●Surgery to remove the gallbladder and the stones – Gallbladder surgery is routine in the United States. But it involves using anesthesia, so it has some risks. The surgery does not affect digestion very much. But about half the people who have surgery have mild symptoms afterward, including watery bowel movements, gas, or bloating. These symptoms usually get better. People who have their gallbladder removed do not need to worry about gallstones coming back. ●Treatment to get rid of the stones but keep the gallbladder – People who choose this approach can take medicines to break up gallstones or be treated with a device that breaks up stones (or both). Medicines only work with some stones, and even then they take time – months to years. The stones can also come back after these treatments. How do I know which treatment to have? — The right treatment for you will depend on: ●How large your stones are ●Whether you have symptoms, and how bad the symptoms are ●How you feel about the treatment options Ask your doctor or nurse how each treatment might affect you. Then work with him or her to find the treatment that makes the most sense for you. Can I do anything to keep from getting (more) gallstones? — Yes. You can try to keep yourself at a healthy weight. People who are overweight are more likely to get gallstones. If you plan to lose weight quickly – even if you have never had gallstones – ask your doctor or nurse what you can do to keep from getting gallstones. Losing weight quickly – for example, through weight loss surgery – can lead to gallstones. But your doctor or nurse can give you medicines to keep that from happening FOR FURTHER QUERIES PLEASE BOOK AUDIO CONSULT TO HELP ME GUIDE YOU MORE IT'S JUST 250 RUPEES TAKE CARE.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

I am suffering from continuous hair fall and I am going bald day by day .Please suggest me remedy. I would be very grateful.

I am suffering from continuous hair fall and I am going bald day by day .Please suggest me remedy. I would be very gr...
Losing 20-100 hair daily is normal. Any more than that and you should start treatment. There can be several factors behind hair loss such as environmental effects, aging, too much stress, excessive smoking, nutritional deficiencies, hormonal imbalance, genetic factors, scalp infections, use of wrong or chemically enriched hair products, certain medicines and medical conditions like thyroid disorder, autoimmune diseases and chronic illnesses to name a few. Do not use shampoo and apply coconut oil and only dry excess oil if any without soap or shampoo Most people who are losing their hair are losing it simply because they have inherited a genetic design that pre-disposes them for baldness. Hair loss can also be caused by underlying medical problems, drugs, infections and a variety of other factors. Medical problems that can cause diffuse hair loss include: anemia, thyroid disease, connective tissue diseases (such as Lupus), severe nutritional deficiencies, surgical procedures, general anesthesia, and severe emotional problems. In women, obstetric and gynecologic conditions, such as post-partum and post-menopausal states, and ovarian tumors can cause hair loss. A relatively large number of drugs can cause a temporary form of hair loss called “telogen effluvium,” a condition where hair is shifted from its growth phase into a resting stage and then, after several months, is shed. Fortunately, this shedding is reversible when the medication is stopped. Drugs that can cause diffuse hair loss include; blood thinners (anti-coagulants), medication for seizures, gout, high blood pressure, and thyroid disease, anti-inflammatory drugs such as prednisone, medications that lower cholesterol and other lipids, mood altering drugs, chemotherapy, oral contraceptive agents (particularly those high in progestins), diet pills, high doses of Vitamin A, and certain street drugs (such as anabolic steroids and cocaine). Although there are a number of dermatologic conditions that cause hair loss, they produce a pattern that is different from that of common baldness (androgenetic alopecia) or the diffuse forms of hair loss mentioned above. Localized hair loss may be sub-divided into scarring and non-scarring types. Alopecia Areata is a genetic, auto-immune disease that typifies the non-scarring type. It manifests with the sudden onset of discrete round patches of hair loss (although the condition can become generalized). In its mild form, it can be treated with local injections of steroids. Traction Alopecia, the hair loss that occurs with constant tugging on the follicles (as seen with tightly braided hair or “corn rows”) is often reversible, but can become permanent if the habit persists for a long period of time. Treatment is only possible if the hair loss from traction is not extensive and if the habit of pulling is stopped. Scarring alopecia can be caused by conditions such as Lupus, Lichen Planus, or radiation therapy. Hair loss can occur as a result of scalp trauma or cosmetic facial surgery and is often amenable to hair transplantation. Radiotherapy can cause both scarring and non-scarring hair loss and it also can be treated with surgical hair restoration if the area is localized. Basic Facts on Common Baldness All humans are born with a finite number of hair follicles. The diameters of the individual hairs in our follicles increase as we grow from infancy to adulthood. However, no matter what we eat, what our lifestyles may be, or what kinds of vitamins we take, we never grow any new hair follicles. At puberty, most men have a low, broad hairline that usually recedes to its mature position by the age of 20 to 22 and then stabilizes. In men with a genetic tendency to go bald, this hairline will continue to recede and new areas of thinning may occur. Severe illness, malnutrition, or vitamin deficiency can speed or exacerbate the process of genetic hair loss, but this hair loss occurs in perfectly healthy men and is generally not a sign of disease. The common hereditary form of hair loss is also referred to as androgenetic alopecia, common baldness, or male pattern hair loss. It is only in recent years, with our greater knowledge of genetics and the chemistry of sex hormones, that we have begun to understand the causes. It is important to note that common genetic baldness also occurs in women, but generally it appears differently than it does in men. In androgenetic alopecia, the hormone DHT, a byproduct of testosterone, affects the follicles that produce terminal hairs in certain parts of the scalp. Under the influence of DHT, susceptible follicles first produce thinner, shorter hairs with weaker shafts. Eventually, these follicles produce only fine, almost invisible, vellus hairs, and they may die out altogether. Androgenetic alopecia requires three conditions for its occurrence: the genes for hair loss, male hormones in adequate quantities, and time. Genes A gene is a single bit of chemically encoded hereditary instruction that is located on a chromosome and represents a tiny segment of DNA. Chromosomes occur in pairs (humans have 23 pairs), and every individual inherits one set of chromosomes from each parent. The genetics of androgenetic alopecia is complicated and hair loss is thought to involve more than one gene. When several genes govern a trait, it is called polygenic. Genes that are located on the X- or Y-chromosomes are called sex-linked. Genes on the other 22 pairs of chromosomes are called autosomal. It is currently believed that the genes governing common baldness are autosomal. This means that the baldness trait can be inherited from the mother’s or the father’s side of the family. The commonly held notion that baldness comes only from the mother’s side of the family is incorrect, although for reasons not fully understood, the predisposition inherited from the mother is of slightly greater importance than that inherited from the father. The term “dominant” means that only one gene of a pair is needed for the trait to show up in the individual. A “recessive” gene means that both genes must be present in order for the trait to be expressed. The genes involved in androgenetic alopecia are believed to be dominant. Just because a person has the genes for baldness, it does not mean the trait will manifest itself and the person will actually become bald. The ability of a gene to affect one’s characteristics, i.e. Be visible in a particular individual, is called “expressivity.” Expressivity relates to a number of factors; the major ones being hormones and age, although stress and other factors yet undetermined, may play a role. None of the genes responsible for male pattern baldness have yet been identified. This suggests that any kind of genetic engineering to prevent common baldness is still many years away. Even if the gene is identified, scientists must still figure out how to control or change them. Hormones Hormones are biochemical substances produced by various glands, such as the pituitary, adrenal and testes, that work on distant sites throughout the body, by secreting their products directly into the bloodstream. These chemicals are very powerful and minute amounts of them have profound effects upon the bodily functions. The primary male sex hormone is testosterone. Testosterone and other related hormones that have masculinizing effects are produced primarily in the testicles. This means that the hormone levels that are seen in adults do not reach significant levels until the testicles develop and enlarge during puberty. These hormones are the cause of many changes that occur in puberty: deepening of the voice, growth of facial hair, development of body odor and acne, change in the muscular development, and change in body shape. These hormones can also cause baldness. The presence of androgens, testosterone, and its related hormone DHT, cause some follicles to regress and die. In addition to the testicles, the adrenal glands located above each of our kidneys, produce androgenic hormones; this is true for both sexes. In females, ovaries, like testicles, are a source of hormones that can affect hair. The relationship between a man’s testicles and hair loss has been recognized for centuries. In societies that had harems, guards were castrated to prevent sexual activity between the guards and women of the harem. In all of those societies, it was observed that men who were castrated before puberty did not become bald. Early in the 20th century, castration was common treatment for patients with certain types of mental illness as it seemed to have a calming effect on their personality. It was also noted that these patients did not become bald. A psychiatrist discovered the specific relationship between testosterone and hormonally induced hair loss during this time. The doctor noted that a castrated, mentally ill patient had a full head of hair, while the identical twin brother of that patient was completely bald. The doctor decided to determine the effect of treating his patient with testosterone, which had recently become available as a drug. He injected his patient, the hairy twin, with testosterone to see what would happen. Within weeks, the hairy twin began to lose all but his wreath of permanent hair, just like his normal twin. The doctor stopped administrating testosterone; however, his patient never regained his full head of hair. The hormone believed to be most directly involved in androgenetic alopecia is dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT is formed by the action of the enzyme 5-a reductase on testosterone. DHT acts by binding to special receptor sites on the cells of hair follicles to cause the specific changes associated with balding. DHT decreases the length of the anagen (growing) cycle of the hair and increases the telogen (resting) phase, so that with each new cycle the hair shaft becomes progressively smaller. This process is referred to as “miniaturization”. In men, 5-a reductase activity is higher in the balding area. Women have half the amount of 5-a reductase overall as compared to men, but have higher levels of the enzyme aromatase, especially in their frontal hairlines. Aromatase decreases the formation of DHT, and its presence in women may help to explain why female hair loss is somewhat different than hair loss in men. Time The mere presence of the necessary genes and hormones is insufficient to cause baldness. Hair loss also requires exposure of susceptible hair follicles to the responsible hormones over time. The length of time required for hair loss to start due to hormone exposure varies from one individual to another, and relates to a person’s genetic expression and to the levels of testosterone and DHT in his bloodstream. Significantly, hair loss does not occur all at once, but tends to be cyclical. People who are losing their hair experience alternating periods of slow hair loss, rapid hair loss, and even long periods of relative stability. The progression of androgenetic hair loss, however, will generally continue over ones lifetime. The factors that cause the rate of loss to speed up or slow down are, for the most part, unknown. Stress When the body experiences stress caused by a traumatic experience, nutritional deficiency, or illness, the rate of hair loss can increase. Women’s hair seems to be more sensitive to the effects of stress than men’s hair. This may be because women with a genetic predisposition towards hair loss usually have a higher percentage of fragile, miniaturized hair. It is important to note that stress generally causes the type of hair loss referred to as telogen effluvium. This is very different from androgenetic alopecia. Telogen effluvium is the reversible shedding of hair in the resting phase when the body senses that it needs to divert its energies elsewhere. Therefore, stress temporarily changes the amount of hair that is shed, but the lost hair is likely to grow back. Hair Loss Fiction Lack of Blood Supply Some assert that a lack of blood supply contributes to hair loss. Bald skin gradually loses some of its blood supply and, consequently, it becomes thin and shiny. These changes, however, are secondary to the loss of hair, not the other way around. When hair follicles are transplanted into thin bald skin, or scar tissue, both of which have a relatively poor blood supply, the presence of the grafted hair causes the local blood supply to gradually increase. Clogged Pores This claim usually accompanies microscopic photographs of an empty follicle clogged with a heaped up waxy substance that prevented the hair from growing. There is no scientific evidence that clogged pores interfere with hair growth. Common sense is sufficient to refute these claims. Why would pores be clogged on the top of the scalp and not on the back and sides? And if clogged pores caused baldness, women would be as bald as men. Hats and Hair Loss Folklore says that men who constantly wear hats are more likely to become bald, as hats prevent air from circulating to the head. Like other tissues in the body, hair follicles get their oxygen through the bloodstream, rather than from ambient air. Snake Oil Remedies and other Magic Cures Many over-the-counter lotions and drugs claim to restore lost hair with new products appearing all the time. Whether sold through drug stores, salons or mass media, most are useless. A 1989 Supreme Court decision prevents these potions from being advertised or sold in the United States as medications that prevent hair loss or promote the re-growth of lost hair; however, such claims are still made. Charlatans of every age have eagerly tried to profit from a gullible public. Excepting cancer and arthritis, hair restoration has been one of the most fertile areas for medical quackery. For example, in the same year that the principle of the magnetic field was described, “magnetic” and “electric” hairbrushes for the prevention and treatment of baldness appeared on the market. Concoctions that claimed to be “snake oils” were also sold for the treatment of arthritis and baldness. In hindsight, it is understandable that an unsophisticated person, who was crippled by pain from arthritis and who lived at a time when there was no better treatment for his illness, might be desperate enough to try “snake oil” as a treatment for arthritis. However, until the Supreme Court decision banning their promotion, ads for products that claimed to be able to restore hair filled the television airwaves. Infomercials complete with real doctors, pictures, and testimonials promoted these worthless potions every day. Even today, it is difficult for the layperson to differentiate between fact and fiction when it comes to hair loss remedies. There are two FDA approved medications to treat androgenetic alopecia. Though they have limited benefit, they may be useful for many. These two drugs, minoxidil and finasteride, are discussed in detail in the chapter titled “Hair Loss Medications.” In order to have healthy volume of hair on your head, the rate of hair loss and replacement should be in tandem. With age, your hair growth cycle shows signs of slowing down and factors like age, disease, and hormonal changes among others affect the pace at which an individual hair follicle moves through the 3 phases of the hair cycle. A disruption in your hair cycle can give rise to loss of hair that’s rapid and unexpected. Hair loss or alopecia can affect both men and women. So what can cause your hair to fall at an alarming rate? The reasons behind hair loss could be many, but here are 6 major ones: 1. Lack of protein in your diet When you exclude protein from your diet, your body starts to conserve the protein that it has by altering the growth cycle of your hair. In such cases, your hair enters into the resting stage, resulting in zero hair growth. In India, 9 out of 10 people are said to suffer from low amounts of protein in their diet, with 91% vegetarians reporting protein deficiency. 2. Iron deficiency Iron plays a very important role in the transportation of oxygen to the different organs of the body. Lack of iron in your diet (which is the principle reason behind anaemia) can give rise to several health problems including hair loss. Your body attempts to direct oxygen to important organs so as to support their functioning. As a result, your scalp witnesses a low supply of oxygen, which causes hair loss. 3. Vitamin D-3 deficiency Deficiency of vitamin D-3 gives rise to a type of hair loss called Telogen Effluvium (TE). This is a temporary hair thinning phenomenon that takes place when the all the hair on your scalp enter the resting phase at the same time, subsequently causing you to shed a large amount of hair later on. 4. Smoking Smoking can also affect the health of your hair, especially the rate at which it falls and the number of strands lost in a day. A research carried out by the Harvard School of Public Health has revealed that smoking can cause a rise in a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT). An increase in DHT level prevents new hair cells from growing and causes hair follicles to reduce in size with each hair cycle. As a result, the area on your scalp that gets affected by DHT experiences a lack of hair growth. 5. Use of testosterone supplements in gym Intake of testosterone in the form of supplements and injections to build muscle mass can trigger hair loss in men. This takes place when the testosterone in these supplements gets changed into DHT, thereby affecting your hair loss rate and amount. 6. Past illnesses (dengue, TB and typhoid) Falling of hair can also be brought on by illnesses such as typhoid, TB and dengue as the hair growth cycle comes to a stop. Hormonal or metabolic stress that is experienced during the course of such diseases may cause hairfall. The treatments available to cure hair loss are many like 1. Hair transplant Hair transplant is a minimally invasive surgical technique that transfers hair follicles taken from other parts of your body to the balding area. Known by the name of Follicular Unit Transplantation, this hair loss treatment can help to bring back the natural appearance of a fuller head of hair. Hair follicles are harvested using two procedures- follicular unit extraction and strip harvesting. Procedure can vary from 4-8 hours or more depending on the case. 2.Platelet-RichPlasma (PRP) Platelet- Rich Plasma (PRP) is another treatment alternative that can reverse hair loss. It’s a simple non-surgical procedure that lasts about 60-90 minutes. In this form of hair treatment, the patient’s own blood cells, more specifically blood platelets are injected into the scalp. Usually 8 sittings are required with each sitting being 2 weeks apart for better results. 3.LowLevelLaser (Light) Therapy (LLLT) This form of hair therapy utilises light energy of a specific wavelength and threshold to stimulate cellular activity, thereby promoting hair growth. Various controlled clinical tests have revealed its effectiveness in encouraging hair growth in both the genders. Do not use shampoo and apply coconut oil and only dry excess oil if any without soap or shampoo Hair fall is a very common phenomenon that plagues millions of people around the globe. Most of you take supplements of vitamin on a regular basis as it aids the build-up of new hair and skin cells. Read on to find out how exactly do the various vitamins help your hair: 1.Vitamin A: This vitamin controls the production of retinoic acid in your hair follicle. It is not only helpful for skin care but stimulates hair growth. It is immensely fruitful in moisturizing your hair and keeping it healthy. Vitamin A is usually found in sweet potatoes, carrots, tuna, lettuce, mango, sweet red peppers, green leafy vegetables and spinach. 2.Vitamin B: Variants of this, such as B12, aid in hair growth by managing stress. Vitamin B is found in fruits such as oranges and papayas, and beans. 3.Vitamin C: This vitamin helps you absorb iron from the food you eat which is an absolute essential for hair growth. It also boosts the synthesis of collagen that is required to repair the damage and sustain the structure of your hair. Fruits such as papayas, guavas, lemons, sweet lime, orange, kiwi, vegetables such as broccoli, yellow bell peppers and leafy vegetables are replete with Vitamin C. 4.Vitamin D: This vitamin rejuvenates the hair cells in order to form new shafts of hair. Vitamin D is found in dairy products, mushrooms, soy milk, tofu, and cheese. Vitamin D is also naturally made by your body when you expose your skin to the sun, and is called the sun-shine vitamin. 5.Vitamin E: This aids in stimulating capillaries and enhancing blood circulation on the scalp. This additionally contributes to hair growth due to its high anti-inflammatory properties and antioxidant content. Certain foods loaded with Vitamin E are pumpkin, broccoli, olive oil, sunflower seeds, almonds, avocado, tofu and spinach. 6.Vitamin B5: It is also known as Panthenol, is a vital ingredient that is used in medicines to regulate hair fall. Foods enriched with Vitamin B5 are sweet potatoes, sunflower seeds, avocados, cheese and mushrooms. Other Ways to Help Hair- We have gone over the vitamins that may be important for the health of your hair. But lifestyle changes can help just as much. Try: 1.Cutting back on gels, blow-drying, and brushing hair when wet 2.Lowering your stress by exercising at least 30 minutes a day 3.Drinking enough water, 6-8 glasses a day Being mindful of the foods and drinks you consume, the products you use, and the way you manage stress, can all help improve the well-being of your hair. If you wish to discuss about any specific problem, you can ask.
Submit FeedbackFeedback

HI, I am 70 years old male. I am undergoing dialysis for past 10 years. Can I do kidney transplantation? How will be my life style after transplantation.

Hello sir please go through my article What is a kidney transplant? — A kidney transplant is a surgery to insert a new, healthy kidney into a person whose kidneys are diseased (figure 1). Why might I have a kidney transplant? — You might have a kidney transplant to treat kidney failure. Normally, the kidneys filter the blood and remove waste and excess salt and water (figure 2). When people have kidney failure, also called "end-stage renal disease, their kidneys stop working. The healthy, new kidney can do the job of the diseased kidneys. (People need only one kidney to live.) Kidney failure can be treated in other ways besides a kidney transplant. But people usually benefit most from a kidney transplant. People who get a kidney transplant usually live longer and have a better quality of life than people who get other treatments. Where can a new kidney come from? — A new kidney can come from a: ●Living donor – A living donor is usually a family member or friend. He or she can be related to you, but doesn't need to be. A living donor can also be someone you don't know, but this is not as common. ●Dead donor – If you don't have a living donor, you can get on a list to get a kidney from a dead donor. An organization called "UNOS" keeps this list. When a new kidney becomes available, UNOS decides who is next on the list to get it. What needs to happen before I can get a kidney transplant? — Before you can get a kidney transplant, your doctor will send you to a transplant center. There, you will meet with doctors, and have exams and tests to check your overall health. To get a kidney transplant, you need to meet certain conditions. If you have a living donor, he or she needs to go to a transplant center, too. He or she will meet with doctors and have exams and tests. Donors also need to meet certain conditions to donate a kidney. Plus, in most cases, your donor's blood needs to match your blood. If you don't have a living donor or if he or she isn't a good match, you can get on the UNOS list. Your doctor can also talk with you about other ways to find a living donor. More information about how to plan for a kidney transplant can be found in the following topic: (see "Patient education: Planning for a kidney transplant (The Basics)"). What happens during a kidney transplant? — If you have a living donor, a doctor will remove one of his or her kidneys. He or she will also remove the ureter, which is the tube from the kidney to the bladder that urine flows through. A doctor will make an opening in your lower belly and put the new kidney in your lower belly. He or she will attach the new ureter to your bladder. A new kidney is not put in the same place as the diseased kidneys. In fact, the diseased kidneys are often left in the body. What happens after a kidney transplant? — After a kidney transplant, you will stay in the hospital for about 3 to 5 days. Your doctor will do exams and tests to make sure your new kidney is working correctly. You will need to take medicines for the rest of your life. These medicines are called "anti-rejection medicines. They help your body's infection-fighting system accept the new kidney. Normally, the infection-fighting system helps people stay healthy by attacking objects in the body that come in from the outside ("foreign objects"). Anti-rejection medicines help keep your body from attacking the new kidney. What problems can people have after a kidney transplant? — In most cases, people do well after surgery. They can go to work and be active. But some people have problems after a kidney transplant. These problems can happen right after the surgery or years later. They include: ●Rejection of the new kidney – Even though people take anti-rejection medicines, their body might still reject and attack the new kidney. This can happen any time after a kidney transplant. It happens less often when the new kidney is from a living donor than when the new kidney is from a dead donor. ●Side effects from the anti-rejection medicines – The medicines have short-term side effects. For example, they increase a person's chance of getting serious infections. They also have long-term side effects. For example, they can increase a person's chance of getting certain types of cancer. ●High blood pressure or heart disease ●Diabetes (high blood sugar, also called "diabetes mellitus") What happens if I don't take my anti-rejection medicines? — If you don't take your anti-rejection medicines, your body will reject your new kidney and attack it. This will cause your new kidney to stop working
3 people found this helpful
Submit FeedbackFeedback